The Books

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Sharpe’s Sword (1983)

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In which Sharpe carries his sword (a 1796 pattern Heavy Cavalry sword, an ill-balanced butcher’s blade) to the extraordinary battle outside Salamanca where, to quote an enemy General, Wellington ‘destroyed forty thousand Frenchmen in forty minutes’. Sharpe also has to contend with the Marquesa de Casares el Grande y Melida Sadaba (a bit of all right), a British spymaster and, at the very end, some unbroken French squares.

Sharpe’s Company (1982)

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This is one of my favourite books and it tells the story of the horrifying assault on Badajoz in 1812. The British were in a foul mood, they had been given a hard time by the garrison and suspected that the city’s Spanish inhabitants were French sympathisers, so when they got inside they went berserk. Not a pretty story, but a compelling one, and made better by the baleful reappearance of Sergeant Obadiah Hakeswill. This is also, to my mind, the best of the TV programmes.

Sharpe’s Gold (1981)

Regional Editions:
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It’s always said that the second book is the most difficult to write, and I can remember finding it very hard, which is a reason why I’ve never re-read Sharpe’s Gold either. I do remember a splendid scene with Sergeant Patrick Harper and a dungheap and that Sharpe meets the first of his wives while trying to rescue a great pile of Spanish gold. Watching the video is no help in reminding me what’s in the plot because the story on the TV programme bears absolutely no resemblance to the story in the book – weird.

Sharpe’s Eagle (1981)

Regional Editions:
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The very first Sharpe book – and if you own an original hardback (of any of the first four or five books) with its dust jacket then take care of it – it’s valuable. I’ve never dared to re-read the book, but so far as I remember it tells the tale of the battle of Talavera and, of course, the plot concerns the need to capture a French ‘eagle’; the battle standard given by Napoleon to each of his fighting regiments.

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