Bulletin Board

Q

Mr. Cornwell,
Once again,  thank you for your books. My older brother who enjoys genealogy  found that one of our ancestors was William Laferte Massey who was with William  at the battle of Hastings. I just think that it is interesting that one of my ancestors saw a real Shield Wall in the past. Thanks again.
David Steele


Q

Hello Bernard,

my name's Conner I am an 18 boy  and I love history and your books and writing style. I have enjoyed your Saxon chronicle books ever since i discovered them in my local library. I wanted to take some time out of my day to just thank you for writing these series of books. They have inspired me in my college course (games development) I'm trying to create a book semi based on your books. I have convinced three of my friend "who hate reading" to start your books. You could say i have made you a bit of money ;). But your books have helped me escape this world from time to time. I would like to thank you again and to tell you never to stop writing books like the Saxon chronicles cause they are amazing. Thank you
Conner Byrne

A

Thank you Connor!


Q

Thank you for the hours of entertainment you have provided over the years with your unique
writing talents.  Your historic novels are truly outstanding.  Hope to see a sequel to the "Pagan Lord" and follow  Lord Uhtred along the miles to Bebbanburg when he reacquires his ancestral home.  Please hurry as my time on earth may preclude reading the final book.
C'Ya,
Check your cinches occasionally.
Rex


Q

Your books cause sadness in me simply because they end. On the other hand that fact does allow me time to enjoy other authors and activities as well as complete everyday chores. Thank you for such wonderful characters and engrossing tales. Please do not stop.
Bruce Darwin


Q

Morning Bernard!

Having read Louise's comment a couple of days ago I feel I must respond to her thoughts.  Surely by definition the unstable nature of the 7 kingdoms during the 9th and early 10th centuries is the very essence of The Pagan Lord?  To me the growing power of Wessex countered by the establishment of what will become the Danelaw, with the diminishing powers of Mercia and East Anglia sandwiched between the two, means that Uhtred must constantly backtrack to hold onto what he considers 'his' lands.  It is people like Uhtred who are the strength of what will become Engaland...that power behind the throne that keeps things on track almost in spite of the perceived weaknesses of Alfred and indeed Edward of Wessex.

I loved The Pagan Lord.  I loved the sense of world-weariness Uhtred exudes as if to say 'here we go again'...and I loved the sense of mellowing that you give him where Aethelflaed is concerned...my God she is going to be (and obviously was) a powerful woman!  I love the sense that Uhtred recognises his impending 'redundancy' as the throne moves towards the potential stability and unity under the later Aethelstan.

Personaly, keep 'em coming Bernard...loving every page.

Andrew Wicks, Norwich, England


Q

hi it's me once again i told you before how  greatly enjoy the character of father prylig  and i like how his nature  and his place as uhtred ,s dear friend and staunch  ally on the battlefield  are the complete opposite of bishop asser his sworn enemy and bitter rival on the political court as both men are welsh and from the same welsh kingdom and both are devout christians and how both men show the extreme opposites of the church that are present throughout its history.. I also love how both are commited to alfreds dream of a unified  christian saxon britain despite the effect it could have on their native people .. and despite their vast personal difference.. which brings me to my questions  I wonder if uthred would ever become aware that there is still  a roman empire in the east (of sorts ), and someone from that empire maybe a warrior priest like prylig would make a diplomatic visit to britain and somehow get entangled with uhtreds group . i imagined it
would be quite funny for uhtred to discover  that there are other christian groups that dont completely follow the doctrines  of the one he knows and considering his fascination of Britain s roman past he might learn a great deal of the great roman  civililization from that priest considering  the learning in the east as well as the military at that time  was currently more advanced  than anything they had  in the west . come to think of it i kinda always hoped for uhtred to come across  foreign priests  from faraway places that were  once warriors like father prylig  i guess that wishful thinking goes back to the character of sagramor in the arthur trilogy and how he was the most intelligent learned and baddass and above all most loyal of arthurs followers  aside from Derfel despite the fact that he was from africa and britaiin was nothing to him yet he came  stayed and fought and finnaly  died for its people out of love for his master arthur who was a briton.in any case i look
forward the pagan lord soon as i can and will look forward to seeing how uhtreds tale will conclude thanks .
Michael Powers

A

Hope you will keep reading...


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

In a January 28th posting, Tony D'Amico asked if there were any novels about William the Conqueror available.  There are a number of novels available on the Norman Conquest, but most of them are from the Saxon perspective, with Hereward being a particularly popular character.  The one exception I know of that Tony might want to check out are the Conquest series by James Aitcheson.  There are three so far; "Sworn Sword," "The Splintered KIngdom" and "Knights of the Hawk."  They deal with the Norman effort to subdue the Saxons after the battle of Hastings.  The central character is Tancred a Dinant, a Norman knight in William's service.  The Duke figures prominently in the novels.

Alan Kempner

 

I noticed in the "questions" page that somebody had asked whether there was any novels that dealt with 1066 etc. I have read one which is called "The Last English King" by Basil Rathbone. It's a good novel and is told from the viewpoint of one of Harold's surviving Housecarls. I think I would be fair to say that a reader of the Warrior series such as me possibly might not find it quite as engaging but at least it is a good story that deals with that incredible year in English history.
P.S Absolutely love your work...my band actually did a folk rock song that deals with the Ethandun part of Uhtred's story, though it was difficult fitting much into 3 verses!
Best Wishes
Pete (Essex, Eng)


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I'm so excited about your books that I can never expect, it seems to last the latest volume. Now I have to wait until June 2014 to finally "The Pagan Lord" (in german = Der Heidenfuerst) appears.
This is unfair, you need months to create these masterpieces and read my friends and I are within a few hours by reading done.
For me you are the best author of our time and I think the additional SIR you have earned.
I love your style and as a bygone era with the heroes to have in your books back to life and to give the reader the feeling of being in the midst of the turmoil. I feel like every time a witness and a silent observer in your stories.
Please excuse that I can only write by translator
but I promise you that I shall preserve all their books as a great treasure and hope yet many come to this.

With very best regards from Germany

Kai

ORIGINAL TEXT:
Lieber Herr Cornwell,

ich bin so begeistert von ihren Büchern dass ich es nie erwarten kann bis endlich der neueste Band erscheint. Jetzt muss ich noch bis Juni 2014 warten bis endlich "Der Heidenfürst" (The Pagan Lord) erscheint.
Das ist unfair, Sie brauchen Monate um diese Meisterwerke zu schaffen und meine Lesefreunde und ich sind innerhalb weniger Stunden mit dem lesen fertig.
Für mich sind sie der beste Autor unserer Zeit und ich denke den Zusatz SIR haben sie verdient
Ich liebe ihre Art und weise längst vergangene Zeiten mit den Helden in Ihren Büchern wieder auferstehen zu lassen und dem Leser das Gefühl zu geben mitten drin im Getümmel zu sein. Ich fühle mich jedesmal wie ein Zeitzeuge und stiller Betrachter in Ihren Geschichten.
Bitte entschuldigen Sie das ich nur mittels Übersetzer schreiben kann
aber ich verspreche Ihnen das ich alle ihre Bucher behüte wie einen großen Schatz und hoffe das noch ganz viele dazu kommen.

Mit allerbesten Grüßen aus Deutschland

Kai

A

 

Vielen Dank!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,
I am a tremendous fan of your Saxon novels, and have enjoyed much of your other work as well - but Uhtred is always my favorite.  I just finished The Pagan Lord about an hour ago, and find myself worried about Uhtred for the first time. Obviously, he's terribly wounded, and unable to communicate, but Gisela's image has faded away, and I assume he will return to the land of the living. I am relieved about that; somehow it is very important to me that Uhtred have the closure of regaining Bebbanburg, which perhaps you will allow him to do.
You say at the end of your historical note that the final "victory will be won by Aethalstan....and Uhtred will be there to witness it." I'm torn by your ambiguity here, which I assume is deliberate.  Edward and Aithelflaed will both be dead, and  I find myself worried that it is our Uhtred's son who will be there.  Perhaps he will be fighting, and Uhtred the Elder will witness the final victory. I realize my worry is pointless, and that I must trust you to take good care of our boy (I think of the boy kidnapped by Ragnar when he was 10).
I really like your female characters.  In so many historical novels centering around war, the female characters are two dimensional and uninteresting, they tend to scream a lot, or get kidnapped frequently. Your female characters hold their own with the men in all ways except rowing or fighting with a sword.  I particularly enjoy Aethelflaed, and have looked her up and read about her.  I'm so glad that her dreadful husband is finally going to exit the picture.  I always feel as though I can just watch the clever wheels go round and round in her head, just as they did in her father's.
I've read in your comments and questions sections that you are at work on the sequel, and am happy to hear that. I am happy to know that, as you said at the end of The Last Kingdom, "Uhtred will campaign again."
One note of little importance, except to me. I love your physical descriptions of the characters, including those of Uhtred himself, this huge, strong, blond man, a "man of metal," I think you described him once.  I didn't have a good mental image of him for quite a long time, until (don't laugh please, Mr. Cornwell) I watched the Marvel movies with Chris Hemsworth, all 6'3' of him, playing Thor. When I first saw him, I laughed in recognition, and thought, "there's my Uhtred!" I think Uhtred would enjoy being compared physically with Thor, don't you?
Thank you so much for all the pleasure you've brought me in reading your books. Keep up the great work, and please take care of our Uhtred for me.
Sincerely,
Susan Bennett Brady
Grasonville, MD  USA


Q

Mr. Cornwell:
As always, I LOVED your latest installment of the 'Saxon Series,' or THE PAGAN LORD. Your battle descriptions as always are fantastic; it's as if the reader is fighting IN THE SHIELD WALL itself!!! I've got one of my three sons also hooked on your books. I've written to you before and particularly enjoy and own all your Medieval related works, a subject I've taught for many years, as a Senior Lecturer in History at a number of colleges.
I was a little disappointed in 'The Pagan Lord,' not from any story or historical standpoint, but I thought the use frequently of a certain four-letter word was a little too much. I hadn't seen that before. I'm no prude nor a Puritan, and realize the Vikings or Danes probably were pretty rough in their speech, but since you are such a great writer, I did not see the need for you to use the 'S' bomb to the degree you did in the present volume.
I also noticed how you had two characters, RULF and ROLLA this time.  I mentioned previously how HROLF or ROLF was a very famous Viking chieftain name (as you know historically, from Denmark with HROLF KRAKI, to HROLF GANGER, the Norwegian Viking and ancestor of William the Conqueror to name at least two individuals). The recent T.V., VIKING series on 'National Geographic' made the mistake in having the main character's brother, be ROLLO, then he gets baptized with the "Christian name of ROLF." Actually, it's the other way around, ROLLO being the Latinized rendition of ROLF, a pagan name originally. I've mentioned this of course before. Yes, I'm a little partial to the name of ROLFE/ROLF/ROLPH!!!  (By the way, the 'coat of arms' of the Rolfe/Rolph family of England IS THE RAVEN, as well, which has been in the family as its symbol, at least since the 1440's.
Anyway, thanks again for writing such great books, which make 'history come alive.' I've referred you and your works to many of my students, and I've been teaching Medieval, Ancient, and Early American history through the Civil  War, for some 26 years now.  Looking forward to the next volume of Uhtred who hopefully will defeat his cousin with the aid of a 'Viking NAMED ROLF!'  Ha!
Dr. Dan Rolph