Your Questions

Q

hello. I have been a avid fan of your work for many years, and you have given me many, many hours of reading pleasure. I have a question about your main characters in your books. They all seem to share a common characteristic, in that they are all people who stick out like a sore thumb in their surrounding, for want of a better expression. Sharpe is a officer who has jumped up from the ranks, and doesn't belong in that sense, Derfel is a Saxon but is brought up to be a Briton, Uhtred is similarly a Saxon who is more at ease with the Danes, and Starbuck is a northerner, fightin for the south. Do you purposely put your characters in this situation to add to the story, or is it a sub-conscious detail that has crept into your work? I know some authors draw on their own experiences, when writing characters, and with some just for the purpose of making a more interesting character.thanks. Richard Jones

A

I'm sure it's sub-conscious, though I do have a conviction that heroes as outsiders make for more interesting characters (though I can't say I've invested a huge amount of thought in that). Rider Sandman of Gallows Thief is fairly normal? But you're right, most of them are square pegs in round holes. There's probably a psychological explanation involving my childhood, but as I try very hard not to remember that period of my life, I'm not going to look for that explanation!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, Although I would very much like to see your sure-to-be critically-acclaimed performance in Macbeth, I am unable to make the trip. Are there any plans to make a trip to Washington, D.C., in the near future? I checked the Diary page and saw nothing, but I am holding out hope there is something in the works. I saw by searching the archives that there seems to be a fair amount of interest in the area. My wife and I have a guest room and would be happy to give you a lift to Politics and Prose! Seriously, though, it would be a treat to have you come to the D.C. area for an appearance. Regards, Beau Ellis Takoma Park, MD

A

No plans at the moment, but thank you for your kind invitation!


Q

Hi, what can I say.... mainly how much reading your novels has given such enjoyment to both myself and many of my friends. The Sharpe series, will always be your bread and butter but I truly believe that the likes of your new Saxon stories and in particular the Warlord Chronicles, will be your true epitaph. They reek of class and drive home better than any other contemporary book or film, the brutal life that our ancestors must have lived. Speaking of which, the main point that drove me to contact you was (and probably something that has been asked of you many times), can you forsee a Lord Of The Rings style epic film trilogy of the Warlord Chronicles? I imagine many of your readers would simply drool at the prospect of such. Also, please can you authorise CD versions of all your books (unabridged) can't find Warlord at all or a few others, just on tape. And more Tim Piggot-Smith too. Argh, just finished Lords Of The North......I want more and soon please!! Anyway, my thanks to you once more.... Take good care Waeffe

A

I'd love to see it happen, but I fear the Warlord Chronicles may prove too expensive to film. I'll see what I can do about the unabridged CDs!


Q

Ages ago I wrote to you (snail mail) and enquired on the subject of the Jacobite rebellion, and also enquired if you considered a series on the 1745 rising, with of course a hero named Mclean! any thoughts? very little has been written (novels) on this piece of Scottish (mainly) history, your style of writing would be ideal! I have every hardback of yours and would love one (or more) in a Jacobite series. Come on, you did the Starbuck books, how about nearer home now? thanks, Paul

A

It's a lovely thought, and I've done some research, and who knows? It might happen.


Q

Hi You mentioned on your web site, a few days ago, that you are planning a new book on the American Revolution. Do you have any approximate timescales and will it be linked with Redcoat? Of all your books, I think I enjoyed Redcoat the most. Thank you for all your work, Simon

A

It won't be linked with Redcoat, sorry about that! I'm not sure, either, when it will be written because there's a vast amount of very detailed research still to do - but I hope to get to it in the next couple of years.


Q

Was Lady Grace Sharpe's all time true love? What are all of the BBC productions of Sharpe ? I'm sure they are listed, but I can't seem to find them. I thoroughly enjoy your books. They are fabulous. I agree with you...the Warlord Chronicles are my favorites also. Rusty Rabb

A

Um, one of them. Lucky man. Up there, certainly, probably in the top three. Lucille gets it by a nose, though.

Go to the Frequently Asked Questions page of this website and scroll down to the 7th posting for a list of the Sharpe films.


Q

Dear Bernard, Recently just watched Waterloo (with Christopher Plummer as Wellington) again for the first time, in a long while and have a question about it, I hope you can help with. It's the bit where the British or allied troops are lined up just before the battle starts ,drinking their gin (and no doubt crapping themselves!) and start singing a couple of songs that go a bit like this:- One goes, "Who's the fella with the hooky nose...our (something) ... who's the fella who etc etc. and the other one goes, "Boney fought the prooshians aye, aye, aye." It's a great bit of the film that puts you in soldiers boots so to speak, but the question is do you know if these are authentic songs (that were sung at this or other battles), and if so how they go exactly? Hope you can help. Thanks, Paul.

A

I'm sorry I don't know. I have a book of soldiers' songs from the period, but it includes neither, and I wouldn't know where to go to find out. I have an idea that the second is authentic, but I couldn't swear to it. I know nothing about the first. You might try asking some Napoleonic re-enactors - they have an encyclopaedic knowledge of such things.


Q

Hi, sorry about all the questions I've been asking you lately. I was wondering if you have read the book, The Da Vinci Code. and if you have, did you find the writing just as bad as I did. Don't get me wrong, the story is interesting, but Dan Brown's writing style is that of a highschool student's. When I was in 6th grade I read the book, and even then I could not stand it, about chirstmas time I started reading your books and then reread the Da Vinci Code and found it even more, whats the word, Amateurish, Thanks, and I'm sorry for asking a question that doesn't have anything to do with your books, Thanks, Calder (14)

A

I don't think Dan Brown is renowned for the quality of his prose (that's putting it kindly), but I imagine he doesn't care much, because he is renowned for the size of his bank account. So he was doing something right! But I'm delighted you're enjoying my books and hope you have a glowing career ahead as a judicious and perceptive critic.


Q

A few years ago you were set to come and visit Truro in Cornwall in the UK. I turned up to see you but unfortunately the event was cancelled. Do you have any plans to return to my part of the UK at any time in the foreseeable future ?? Many Thanks PS Keep up the wonderful books. I can't wait to read the further adventures of Richard Sharpe in "Sharpe's Fury". Shaun Hosking

A

Don't know yet, but keep your eye on the Diary page.


Q

Any chance of celtic britain against roman, stories in the near future? or anything around the pre roman celtic period? (not stonehenge era) many thanks Mike

A

It's not on the long-range plan, but never say never. I'm a bit wary of the Romans, mainly because it would mean doing so much research, but who knows? Maybe it will happen.


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