Your Questions

Q

Hello There, It's horrible, I'm trying to put it out of my mind but there it remains like some blue-mould on a sandwich you're halfway through...page 161 Sharpe's Devil: "Sharpe, seeing his very first sea fight,". Would you forgive me for defacing my copy just so that Sharpe's Trafalgar doesn't seem like a dream or an ad-lib! Also, I was wondering if the spelling of my name (pronounced Alan..despite years of childish "Olwyn" taunting) stood out when you signed my copy of Heretic (thank you muchly for that)? I am born and raised in Northern Ireland but it seems the name is Welsh. Any chance of naming a character for me, go on, I'll be your best friend and promise not to claim any likeness rights! Thank you for taking the time to read this, I have spent years enjoying your work (have read everything except the thrillers and Redcoat and my collection holds 22 first editions of your works) Your grateful fan Allyn Mills

A

The problem about Devil and Trafalgar, of course, is that I wrote the books out of order. It's a lousy way to write a series - but think of it this way, if I took Devil as gospel then there wouldn't have been Sharpe's Trafalgar, so I think the discrepancy is worth it! I'll think about a character called Allyn!


Q

Mr Cornwell Let's suppose Richard Sharpe's triumphant return to England after Waterloo is rewarded with the full rank of Colonel and command of the South Essex. What happens next...... does the scoundrel Sir Henry Simmerson get his just deserts and does the Lady Jane finally get her wonderful and final come-uppance? Does Sharpe, prior to retiring to an idyllic lifestyle in Normandy, put down an Irish rebellion (with the help of Harper) that was masterminded by Simmerson thus saving the Prince Regents life?&&. No? Ok&.can I please know what happened to Simmerson and the Lady Jane after Sharpes Waterloo (loose ends you know&.) Cheers Paul Dixon

A

One day I might - might - get round to all that, but I honestly haven't thought much about it (and won't till I get to write any such book). I'm sure Siimmerson gets his just deserts, but probably in hell.


Q

first I have enjoyed many of your books the Arthur trilogy being my favorites. I was wondering if you know of any novels about the scottish jacobites? Mike

A

None that I can think of . . . . anyone else know any?


Q

I read that somewhere Mr. Cornwell bought a Baker rifle and was wondering where he bought it and if he ever shoots it. I love your books, I have read the grail quest series and have just started to read Sharpe's Battle after reading all the other Sharpe books leading up to it. I will be sad when they are over but I will start a different series. Keep it up, Will Mitchell

A

I wish I did have one! I do have one of the replicas made for the filming, but it's not proofed so can't be shot.


Q

Mr. Cornwell, it is a pleasure to write to you. I'm from Brazil and I'm reading the Vagabond and I have a question. David the Bruce is son of the Robert the 17 Bruce right? And Who is the son of Eduard the longshanks of england? And there is any king of England that is son of William Wallace of Scotland like is told in the movie braveheart? The Wiliam Wallace story is trust? Sorry for my bad English and congratulation for your books are the best. thanks Netto.

A

David the Bruce was the son of the great Robert the Bruce. Edward I ('Longshanks') was succeeded by his son, Edward II, whose mother was Eleanor of Castile. No king of England was the son of William Wallace. Eleanor was long dead before he was around and Edward's next wife, Margaret, did not come to England till long after Wallace had been defeated. The film Braveheart is very bad history, and utterly untrustworthy.


Q

hello Mr Cornwell, I have read all of your Sharpe books as well as some others of yours. I was wondering what the role was of the RSM in a Regiment, and who had more influence with the men, the RSM or the officers? Thankyou for taking time to answer my question. Josh

A

He's the most senior enlisted man - and he's very much a link between the battalion commander and the men in the ranks. He has FAR more influence than any junior officer!


Q

Just a fan letter I'm afraid, nothing world shattering except...I remember reading a novel years ago set in the Peninsular war and I remember really enjoying it. The thing is it featured an episode in which a character used pages from (I think ) a bible as cigarette papers. Something similar happens in a Sharpe book I think...did you read that same novel yourself ? Was the use of such papers a common thing in the army? did I imagine the whole thing? Just keep up the excellent books!
Mark Tomlinson

A

I don't remember reading a novel like that. I'm sure using book pages to make cigars was fairly common, but few other than Sharpe would use a bible.


Q

I enjoy your books very much, especially the Sharpe series. How would you describe the type of sword that Sharpe is given by the wounded officer in Sharpe's Rifles? I recently started watching the video series and I haven't seen another weapon like that one. Thanks again for the great stories. Leon Schnabel

A

It's the 1796 pattern Heavy Cavalry Sword, the sword carried by British heavy-cavalry troopers.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, I have read many of your novels and you were kind enough to autograph one for me. Is there a possibility of writing something about the Crimean War? michael calkins

A

It's crossed my mind, but I have no plans for it at the moment.


Q

I'm just starting "Sharpe's Siege." I've thoroughly enjoyed all the preceding volumes and although I look forward to finishing the series I'm sure there will be a sense of loss. There's just one thing. In every volume, it seems like there's one word, or one reference, that's a little jarring -- a word that's not quite right, or a reference that's anachronistic, etc. It's occurred to me that perhaps you do it on purpose just to see if we're paying attention. I'd have to go back through the books to find most of the examples. One example is the reference to "siamese twins" in "Sharpe's Regiment." It was my understanding that the term was coined to describe Chang and Eng Bunker. Although they were born in 1811 (in Siam), and the novel is set in late 1813, it seems doubtful to me that the term "siamese twins" would have been in use in England that early. Any thoughts? Bill Nourse

A

Siamese twins in Regiment? I'm an idiot, that's why. The term isn't recorded in English till 1830, so I was wrong.


Page 856 of 988« First200855856857Last »