Your Questions

Q

Mr. Cornwell, Just wanted to point something out, on wikipedia.org under 'The Warlord Chronicles' it says that Enemy of God was renamed Bloody Ground in the U.S.A...? I had a look around, as I thought to myself; surely this will be confusing, having two books called the same? However on amazon.com and on your own site here, there is no mention of this. Was this just a fault by the author who wrote this on wikipedia? Also, growing up I learnt from school and children books about the Legendary King Arthur. I also always thought that Morgan (or Morgause) seduced Arthur, then gave birth to Mordred. Mordred therefor I always thought as the illegitimate illegitimate son of Arthur. In The Warlord Cronicles it is different. Mordred, Arthurs half brother died, his pregant wife gave birth to a son, also called Mordred. Therefor Mordred in your story is Arthurs nephew. Also I have always thought of Tristan of being King Marks nephew, but in your books he is Marks Son. Just wondered why did you decide to change this? I know there are many differences of the mordern adaption of the story of Arthur and these are not the only differences in the trilogy, but just out of curiosity, why did you make little changes like these two? Totally not criticism, I love these books!

The Warlord Chronicles and The Saxon Stories are my favorite of your books, as I love both periods in British History. What period in time would you like to be born in? Congratulations on the OBE and I am eagerly awaiting the next in the Saxon Stories! Charlotte, Kent, England

A

Wikipedia is wrong.

Yes! There are all sorts of variants on these stories! Morgan is also depicted as Arthur's sister (and thus we have an interesting strand of incest in Camelot!), but I decided to adopt a slightly different route . . . . ditto Tristan. There really isn't one canonical or authoritative version, though I suppose most people would settle for Malory's account. I drew on some of the earliest sources, which are vague, contradictory and, in the end, confusing, and decided to confuse it further!.

I always say I want to be born after the invention of penicillin, but if I can take a few pills with me? Eliabethan London would be fun. The Regency? Probably the Regency. Arthur's Britain would be vile! And Saxon England not a lot better!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, Just before I retired I was given as a gift your first Starbuck book. Whereby introducing me to your writings. Since then I have read (I think) everything that you have written (I might add that I am an avid reader retirement being a great help). Please, please, please when am I going to have further adventures of Starbuck, Thomas of Hookton and of course our beloved Sharpe? Although I do feel that having killed off most of his group in Waterloo, can he go anywhere without them? So I must hope for more Starbuck or Thomas. I might add that in the absence of anything new, the previous books are becoming very dog eared. Very best wishes to you may you as one man continue to put pen to paper for the enjoyment of many. P.S.A sequel to Gallows Thief wouldn't go amiss. Thank you for all the pleasure you have given to me Yours sincerely, Trish Southgate

A

A sequel to Gallows Thief is a good possibility. There will be more Sharpe, Starbuck when I can get back to him, but the Grail Quest series is done and I'm not sure there will be more of Thomas of Hookton.


Q

Mr. Cornwell, I wonder if you ever met a relative of mine in Ireland. James Plunkett Kelly the author is related through my mother's side of the family. He past away a few years ago before I ever had the chance to travel to Ireland. We live near Cape Cod and visit there often. thanks in advance. Jim

A

I did not, and I wish I had! The Irish, God knows, are entertainment enough, but Irish authors are usually the icing on a very rich cake!


Q

Hi Bernard Just a small question really are you going to write anymore books about Sharpe and any more on the Starbuck chronicles? I have read most of your books and enjoyed reading them but Sharpe and Starbuck are my favourite. Regards M Keane

A

Yes to both.


Q

LOVE BOTH THE GRAIL QUEST AND SHARPES SERIES. ARE YOU PLANNING ANY FURTHER TALES ON SHARPE AFTER SHARPE'S DEVIL? WOULD LOVE TO HAVE AN ENDING FOR THE SERIES. LOVE YOUR WORK, THANKS FOR THE STORIES. LYNN KRIVE

A

Possibly as a short story or two.


Q

Hi Bernard!!! I really enjoy all your books, I´ve read all of them except for the Sharpe series, I read one (sharpe´s Sword) and it was quite good though I prefer Arthur´s, the grail quest and the saxon stories jejjejeje!!! My real concern is that I´ve read nearly all the books of my favourite writters (David Eddings, Terry Brooks, Terry Pratchet, yours of course:) and I would really appreciate if you could recommend to me any other writer with more or less the same themes or at least as entertaining as yours (I know it´s difficult) Thanks for your attention, Javier, Spain, Madrid

A

Please click on the Reading Club pages of this website for some wonderful recommendations.


Q

I'm a big fan of all your books especially the Arthur books and the saxon stories. I was just wondering if you are going to bring another book out after the Lords of the North? also as a rifleman in the royal green jackets shortly to be come the rifles again may I thank you for the excellent sharpe novels. the books and the tv series showed the britsh public that it was not just the redcoated regiments that fought and won the peninsula war but also a select few chosen men wearing rifle green carrying baker rifles and trained in marksmanship that the majority of the time sealed the day and even pulled victory out of defeat for this country. WHEN KING GEORGE COMMANDS WE OBEY OTHER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY. swift an bold. Nathan Timms

Hi Bernard, Are you writing the next in the Saxon Stories? I am sure there is more to come for Uhtred. Regards Alex

I've been reading the saxon series, I would like to know when the fourth book will be coming out ? Jim Pryke

A

With any luck it will be out in October 2007.


Q

Dear Bernard, after noticing that you grew up in Essex and that you are writing about the Vikings would a novel on the battle of Maldon ever be in the works?????

And in regards to Sharpe. Will Sharpe get to Albuera it was the first geunine Allied victory of British/Spanish and Portugese all figthing side by side as well as the most vicious and at Albuera it's said the French used Napoleon's famed mixed order of both coloum and line. I wondered if there were any other peninsular battles that it was used???

btw I can recommend the new book 1715 on the Jacobite rebellion of that time as worth a read and wondered if you had ever considered the Jacobites at all??? All the best Geraint

A

A tale of Saxon idiocy! Yes, it tempts me because I know the site well. But when? Lord only knows!

I honestly don't know. If he does then it will be the next Sharpe book, and I won't begin writing that for at least a year, so I don't have to make the decision yet. It tempts me, it really does, but I've rather boxed myself in for time - not sure I can get him there, but we'll see. Not sure the French really mixed line and column except by accident (they were blinded by the rainstorm) - except that the column was always supposed to deploy into a line eventually - it was just that they rarely were given time.

Another tempting one! Don't know. I have the book, and enjoyed it, but though I really am tempted there's so much else to write first! Thank you


Q

Dear Bernard I was introduced to the Sharpe books by a friend last Christmas and I have to say I'm hooked. I listen to the audio books going to and from work. What a great way to pass the time. William Gaminara's reading adds to the enjoyment. I have a question: I thought Sharpe killed Obadiah Hakeswill in Sharpe's Fortress. However, he has just turned up again in Sharpe's Company. I realise the latter was written before the former, but I don't remember reading any details on how he survived the snake pit. Have I missed something? Kindest regards Eric McCashey

A

The snakes wouldn't touch him! He survived. He couldn't be killed (says so in the scriptures). If you were a snake, would you bite him?


Q

Mr. Cornwell, first let me say how much I enjoyed Sharpe's Fury. I was glad to see Sharpe using his rifle to good effect, something I've been hoping to see more of. I was also pleasantly surprised that you actually included the lyrics to "Hearts of Oak" in the dialogue, a nice touch. Plus, the description of the Battle of Barrosa was exciting and breathless, making for a memorable read. Second, I've been meaning to ask you about an aspect of your research. Considering how realistically you write about what swords, bullets, etc. can do to the human body, what are your sources for this area of military history? You must be doing something right, because back in high school, I asked my history teacher (who also has a degree in psychology) about the head wound Will Skeat receives at Crecy. He explained scientifically how Skeat could have suffered the effects from the blow as you described them. Keep up the good work.
Jonathan Steplyk

A

I'm fairly sure I copied poor Will Skeat's wound from some other book from another era - almost certainly a non-fiction book of military history, but what it was I can't remember! Thanks anyway.


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