Search Results for Matthew Dodd

Q

Hi Bernard, It's the first time I've visited anyone's web page. what a delight! I'm a big fan and buy everything you publish. I was delighted to confirm my feelings about Matthew Dodd, Uhtred is terrific! can,t wait to read the next one. After reading your Sharpe series I took my son on a motorcycle tour around the peninsular battlefields. What an eyeopener, The tourist official at Almeida says you have a lot to answer for, did you see the sign by the remains of the castle? Booam! I wish you and your family every success and thanks for the pleasure you've brought to millions. Take heed of the speech my father always gave at family events. 'Live long and die happy!' regards Roy Manton. P.S. Come visit us in Bulgaria and I'll show you how the goat herding business works.

A

It's probably been ten years since I was at Almeida . . . . lovely place though, and I don't remember a sign by the castle. 'Sharpe Did This' ??


Q

I have recently reread Sharpe's Escape. During the early battle a rifleman by the name of Matthew Dodd goes missing. In the book Death to the French by C.S.Forester a rifleman by the same name is cut off from his regiment and spends time harassing the French with the aid of Spanish partisans. Is the inclusion of this character in your book a homage to Forester's character ?
Roy Wright

A

I loved the Hornblower books as a kid and so yes, it's a tribute to C.S. Forester.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell Since a young teenager I have been a great fan of C. S. Forester. I read and re-read many of his books, including Death To The French. Later I began reading, and re-reading, Sharpe. I have continued to do so with a great deal of pleasure, but I have often wondered whether some of your inspiration for Sharpe may have come from C. S. Forester's novel. Two days ago I finished Sharpe's Escape for the second time and I noticed newly promoted Rifleman Dodd disappearing down the hill to escape from the French and not returning. I have spent today wondering about that. It has been many years since I read Death To The French but I felt sure that the hero's name was also Matthew Dodd - it's been frustrating waiting for the day to end so that I could check. I am immensely pleased to find this is so, also that they both disappeared on the retreat to the lines of Torres Vedras. I hope this is not just a coincidence. With many thanks for hours of pleasure and entertainment. Yours sincerely, Titus Hackman

A

I loved the Hornblower books as a kid and so yes, it's not just a coiincidence but more of a tribute to C.S. Forester.


Q

Mr. Cornwell, I have enjoyed your historical novels immensely. I recently read the Brigadier Gerard stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and was struck by the similar situation in one of the stories to the band of deserters in Sharpe's Enemy. I was wondering whether Doyle's Brigadier Gerard inspired any of your French characters? It would be interesting if he made a cameo appearance in one of your Sharpe novels. JNR

Sir, At the tender age of 13, in 1970, I discovered the Napoleonic wars through the adventures of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Brigadier Gerard. Churchill was right to say that these stories and not those of the Holmes and Watson may be Doyle's finest. Since that time I have enjoyed the many wonderful books about this period. From Doyle i moved to Forester, Kent, O'Brien and many others as well as enjoying the source works of Napier, Marbot and those who were actually part of that epic time. My degree in and life-long love of history no doubt owes much to the under-recognized historical novels of Doyle and so many others that have followed his trail. When i first discovered your books in the late 1980's (during a trip to Canada), Richard Sharp was immediatly added to the ranks of Etienne Gerard, Horatio Hornblower and all the great characters that bring the Napoleonic warrior to life. I am pleased to say that the complete works of Cornwall (even your early sailing stories), sit as equals in my library with my collections of Doyle, Forester and O'Brien. Please forgive this long-winded preamble but it seemed necessary in order to set the stage for my question. I just finished 'Sharp's Escape' and was delighted to see the name of Matthew Dodd appear. Is this the first time you have included a character from another author in the Sharp series? I cannot recall another example. Can we expect Sharp to encounter any other such characters in future? i can only imagine how Sharp and Gerard might see each other were they to cross paths. I am also curious as to when you first encountered Brigadier Gerard and what influence these stories and Doyle's other historical works have had on your writing. Thank you for the many hours of pleasure you have provided this reader and my very best to you in all your future efforts. Douglas Breithaupt Port Townsend, Washington

A

I have to confess I never read the Brigadier Gerard novels - which is bad of me - but no doubt we came across the same stories in our research. There is nothing new under the sun!

I think it's the only time (Dodd). It's really a tribute to C.S. Forester - and, of course, Dodd vanished in the Busaco campaign . . .


Q

I just re-read C.S. Foresters "Rifleman Dodd" and I was wondering just how much this book influenced you to write the Sharpe books and will Dodd return in other Sharpe books. I know he made it back to his company. (Captain Forthingham's Company). Jim Bundstein

I've read and enjoyed many of your books, especially the Sharpe series. A question: In "Sharpe's Escape", what happened to Corporal Matthew Dodd at Bussaco? On page 112, "Sharpe reckoned Dodd would rejoin later", but I must have missed his reappearance. Any clarification would be appreciated. My wife and I really enjoyed your visit a couple of years ago to the Vancouver library. I love historical fiction, so thanks for all the great writing! John

A

I think Dodd has probably vanished from Sharpe's life - but I'm glad you made the connection.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I've just started reading your "Sharpe" series and am finding them most enjoyable and informative. Since I never studied any history at school, I've found it extremely enjoyable ever since and the Napoleonic Wars occupied me as a reader and occasional wargamer in my twenties. I enjoy your mixture of education and entertainment. After so many books, details may escape you, but is rifleman Matthew Dodds (Sharpe's Havoc) the same who did so well when separated from his company in C.S.Forester's novel? I hope so, it would be a pretty compliment to Hornblower's creator. Thanks again for your work. John Clark, Dunedin, New Zealand.

A

Yes - well-spotted!