Search Results for Uhtred

Q

Hello!

Big fan of the saxon stories and reading previous questions submitted you mention that Uhtred will take part in the Battle of Brunanburh. How many stories do you predict will follow War of the Wolf up until that final battle?

Thank you!

Hussein

 

Hi Bernard

I have read every single one of your books and loved them all...will you writing  another one after WAR OF THE WOLF????

LYNDA

 

Dear Mr.Cornwell

I have just finished reading The Last Kingdom series back to back over the last two weeks  (yes I read fast, sorry).  I am wondering if you have started the next instalment yet and if so when it will be out.   I also enjoyed the Grail Quest books, The Arthur series and Stonehenge. Thank you for making history so easy to read.  I love history and love your books sir.

Lucy Neame

A

I suspect there will be three more books – one underway, two to come, the last being about Brunanburh.


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

I just finished War of the Wolf and loved it.  I have two questions.  First, this is a minor comment, but I missed hearing Uhtred say, "fate is inexorable" this volume.  I would suggest think about bringing that back in future volumes if the fits the story, as to me that is one of the "glue" items that describes Uhtred's views on life.  Secondly, will your be doing any book tours to California over the next year?

Best Regards,

Mark Jensen

A

He says it twice in the book . . . which is not enough!  I’ll do better next time!

 No plans for a trip to California right now - but my thoughts are with those affected by the devastating fires there.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I have read most of your books, enjoyed them all, and at last I have started on the Starbucks Chronicles. About two-thirds through "Rebel" I found this wonderful sentence: "Fools usually need repetition to understand even the simplest of ideas." The speaker was Major Thaddeus Bird, and of all the characters in all your books,  Major Bird comes closest to be of like mind with myself (I am no Uhtred or Sharpe). Would you reveal your inspiration for this character? I'd really like to know.

Keith Biesiada

A

I wish I knew!  Characters like Thaddeus Bird tend to come out of nowhere - well, okay, from my imagination, but how that works I have no idea!  Still, I’m really delighted you like him – he’s one of my favorite characters too!

 


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Q

Hi. My son and I are both huge fans of The Last Kingdom series and we thank you for bringing them to us.

 

I do however have a really really cheeky request. Would it be possible to integrate the word (name) Cyningesburh into an Uhtred story? I'm sure you know what it means. As you can see from our surname there's a ancestoral of connection for us. Although such a connection is lost to me the name lives on.

 

Why would you do this for us?  Because it would make us so happy to know that our family name would be associated with Uhtred. It would become something for my family to pass on, connecting the past with the present and with the future.

 

As my mother (a Northumbrian by the way) is so fond of saying...if you don't ask. You don't get.

 

All the best.

James Kingsbury

A

Cyningesburh? Hmm. Well, I’ve just made a note of it . . . and I promise something dark and awful will happen there if it’s at all possible. So yes, if I can (and I probably will). And mother is right!


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Q

Hi Bernard,

been a fan of your books for a long time now starting with the Sharpe series but this question regards Uhtred. As a carpenter in my 40's I'm finding tasks not as easy as the were say 20 year's ago. Uthred's getting on in years and I'm wondering have you based his capabilities on real life older Warriors?

Richard Polkey

A

I’m not sure about capabilities, though I do have in mind that Marshal Blucher was unhorsed and over-ridden by French cavalry at the battle of Ligny when he was 76. He still managed to lead the Prussians to Waterloo and victory two days later! Uhtred will lose some capabilities, but I doubt you’ll notice if I write him well enough!

 


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I have a quick question which I am genuinely curious about if you don't mind. I'm reading the war of the wolf (which is brilliant and my Friday treat which I read with a beer) and have realised that for the majority of the present and future books Uhtred is classed in the dark ages as an old man. He states in the current book that his Norse nemesis was younger than he'd remembered, less than 40 and a man in his prime. It got me thinking, which of the books is Uhtred at him optimum prime? When he is at his peak as a leader and warrior? I'm guessing it's the Burning Land but might be wrong.

Thanks for your time

Ian

A

I think you might be right – though I’ve never really thought about it. He is getting old, though not impossibly so, and though the average life expectancy was probably around 40 for a healthy man, there were some who defied the odds. Uhtred has to, he doesn’t have a choice because I’m expecting him to win the Battle of Brunanburh. After that he can die in peace!

 


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Q

I know you must be asked this many times, but how far into history will you take Uhtred? Will it be death of Alfred in 899 Athelstan becomes king of the English in 927 or when England is united at Brunanburh. He would be about 60 by Brunanburh.

Andrew Earl

A

Definitely Brunanburh!

 


Q

Gidday Bernard,

you are one of my favourite authors & i especially love your Arthur & Uhtred novels.My best loved character of yours is Finan the Agile Uhtred`s best mate.As you have told a little of his early history any chance of a stand alone book of his younger years in Ireland? It would make the plastic Paddy in me happy.Thanks for entertaining me .

Wayne Mcauliffe

A

A stand alone?  That's not in my plans....but never say never!


Q

Hi Bernard,

I've just read War of the Wolf and it was a great read.

There was some great humour in the book and I wanted to know, what would you say has been the funniest moment / dialogue that you have written in the series so far?

I can't recall which book it was, but the moment when Steapa produces an important note and Uhtred suspects he might eat it! ... That damn near floored me!

Andy

PS - I'm looking forward to your cameo in the show.

A

My favourite joke?  I think it’s in The Flame Bearer and Uhtred is talking about a bishop – talking to a meeting of the Witan – and describing what the bishop would say while visiting a whorehouse.

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

Loved War of the Wolf, but your hints as to another book in the series was very vague. Is this the end of the line for Uhtred?

John Clark

 

Hi Bernard,

I have just finished war of the wolf and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Will it be another Uhtred novel next or will we finally get another Sharpe? Either way I'm happy!

James.

 

Just finished War of the Wolf and would like to know your plans for Book #12 to follow.  Have read books 1-10 twice already.

Peter Beveridge

A

Good lord no!  I’m writing the next Uhtred now!  And there will be a couple more (I hope) after this one.

I’m vaguely thinking to write a last Sharpe after that, then back to Uhtred, but that’s not carved in stone.

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

Firstly, Thank you for signing my copy of your new book  in Newcastle, I've just finished it and am now totally depressed that I have another year to wait for the next one.

During your chat you mentioned thinking about a "one off" novel about the battle of Towton. Obviously we want to get to the end of Uhtred's story and our mouths are watering at the thought of another Sharpe, but what a battle Towton was.

Over 50, 000 people were involved, just to put that into perspective that is roughly 2% of the entire population on one battlefield.

I have read several accounts of the battle but would love to read your take, here's the question... Who's side would you be on and why?

Thank you again for the hundreds of hours of pure pleasure and I look forward to whatever you put your pen to next.

Mike

A

That’s a good question!!  I haven’t really thought about it, though off the top of my head my preference would probably be for the side which had the smaller army . . . which means the Yorkists, and as my family settled in Yorkshire after losing Bebbanburg there’s a link. But I doubt I’ll decide until I do more research!


Q

Hello!

I am writing because I was very much wondering if, despite the amount of time that has elapsed since the publication of Gallows Thief, you might be considering or have considered writing another Sandman novel or a Sandman series, in which he, Sally and Berrigan investigate other dastardly deeds, either as self-employed investigators or as agents of the state.

I've thoroughly enjoyed not only your fictional corpora, but also and in particular, your Waterloo: the History of Four Days... .

While still in the enthralled process of reading Gallows Thief, I truly believe that the stage is already beautifully set for yet another great series, alongside that of Richard Sharpe; Thomas of Hookton, and Uhtred of Bebbanburg, and I would very much look forward to the next Sandman tale in a new, future series.

Anyhow, thank you very much for your time and patience.

Alein Bryan

A

Thank you!  I have considered a follow-up to Gallows Thief, but there are many other things on my list as well....


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Q

Dear Bernard,

Looking forward to picking up my copy of War of the Wolf tomorrow and to watching TLK series 3 next month, hopefully.

Unfortunately, I can't make it to the UK to catch up with you on the tour, but I've heard you have a cameo role in the new TV series and have seen you looking distinguished in a photo from the show.

May I ask you if your cameo role is as a generic warrior etc or are you playing a named character & if so, who is it?

Have a safe trip. I'm still hopefull you'll be able to visit the Isle of Man one day - or maybe Uhtred will.

Thanks.

Boakesey from the IoM

A

Oh, I’m just an unfortunate Dane who wanders into Uhtred’s path at the wrong time. Nothing distinguished!

 


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell.

Love your books, esp, Uhtred. Do you have any idea what was going on in Lancashire area during those times? All the Anglo-Saxon  and Viking focus seems to avoid that region, and I’ve been wondering why. In Australia it’s a bit hard to know who to ask.

Thanks for making history interesting,

Paul D

A

Lancashire was really part of Northumbria, but it seems that whoever was king in York really didn’t have much control over what happened west of the Pennines, so much of what is now northern Lancashire and Cumbria fell to Norsemen. A Saxon burh was established at Manchester (it’s in the new novel), but Saxon control of Lancashire wasn’t cemented until the middle of the 10th century

 


Q

Hello Sir.

Thank you very much indeed for your wonderful books.  I have read  all of them of course,  and followed the Last Kingdom series on TV, and have a question for you.

My understanding from the books is that Uhtred is/has a free Viking spirit that believes in Norrøn mythology, and despises the men of the church and the christian religion, even though he respect the believers. (because he is a free spirit) In the books he often touch his hammer and hope his fate will be good, and I think you have managed to describe the norrøn religion very well.

 

In the TV series on the other hand, this is toned down alot.  There is a lot of focus on the christian cross, and I can not remember once having seen Uhtreds Thor hammer, or any other Thor hammer on vikings. It seems to me that the series is made to appeal to american christians on behalf of the true story of the books?

 

My question is: Am I right, or have I missed something? Do you appreciate the way this subject is portrayed in the TV series??

 

Thank you for your time.

Best regards and thank you again for ALL your books!!

Arne

A

I think the TV series does downplay that theme, though I doubt they’re worried specifically about American Christians – maybe any Christian? On the other hand they have time constraints which I don’t, so they must choose their themes which inevitably means leaving some things out – despite which I’ve enjoyed every episode.  To be honest I haven’t missed the mockery which is in the books, so I think they’re doing a fine job!

 


Q

Hello....my! do people really send you manuscripts?! I couldn't imagine doing that. Anyhow, I have read the Warlord Chronicles-twice,and all of the Saxon tales to date. Two questions if I may: 1- In the Saxon Tales, Uhtred and other characters show a profound distaste for the "welsh" and for "wales" a very marked difference from the way the lands of "Wales" -even Siluria, are loved in the Warlord Chronicles. Now, granted the feelings of the characters are driven by their learned hatreds and loves for peoples and lands, but why so stark a difference? THIS is not a criticism! Please don't be offended. it is just a question based on observation.  2- I have read through your answered questions and see that any new story bridging the time of Derfel the writer monk and Derfel, survivor of Camlann may not be in "the cards". It seems there is still a good bit of story-fiction and history-to tell. Would love to see it. But it is understandable if we never do. Thank you for your time.

Ted Agens

A

Derfel and, indeed, Arthur are what we today would call the Welsh. No wonder they liked themselves!  The Saxons ‘stole’ or conquered their land which they renamed England and yes, they regarded the Welsh as enemies and the Welsh regarded the Saxons as enemies. Uhtred is a Saxon and has the prejudices of his tribe, though he likes some of the Welsh (Pyrlig, King Hywel).  Nowadays, of course, the rivalry is more or less restricted to the rugby field!


Q

Hi Bernard,  (if I may call you that).

I have read a great many of your books including every last one of the Sharpe series.

I have just finished reading "The last Kingdom" and was struck by Uhtred's description (during his marriage period), of a forty year old man as being either "elderly" or "very old".

Now, although life expectancy has varied wildly throughout history, lifespan has remained relatively constant at, to quote a source much more ancient than either of us, three score years and ten (or thereabouts).

Please Sir,

I would love to hear your comment on this particular issue as it seems there are so many famous and distinguished people throughout history and way back into antiquity who have all lived, seemingly, quite happily into their eighties and beyond..

I am most grateful.

Bo Bodragon

A

For almost all human history the life expectancy has been dreadfully low – if, that is, you survived childhood.  In mediaeval Europe you were lucky to reach 30.  The world average in 1900 was just 31! Now, it is an average, and it’s worth remembering that the rich, noble and privileged had a much easier life and often lived to a very old age, but they were few so didn’t affect the average by much.  For peasants and workers life was grim and hard. They not only had continual back-breaking work, they were prey to diseases that they could not cure and to poor harvests which would make a poor diet even worse. Trust me, in modern times, we’re lucky! Your ‘three score years and ten’ was probably written by a scribe of the priestly caste, and therefore privileged!

 


Q

Once Uhtred unites England, will we see a book where Richard Sharpe gets to trade in his redcoat for the green jacket of the 95th?

Much Thanks

William Schlotthauer

A

Probably not . . . I do plan at least one more Sharpe book, but doubt I’ll go that far back. Sorry!


Q

Hello, Mr. Bernard.

I'm Brazilian and a huge fan.

Sorry first, my bad English..

Secondly, I would like to record that I have adoration for the Saxon Chronicles and I sincerely hope it continues for a long time.

Do you intend to continue by giving us the history of England's creation? Can we expect Uhtred's son in the footsteps of his father? Are you thinking of telling us about a Danish king on the English throne?

Please fulfill this dream.

Fraternal hugs.

Olana

A

I intend to take the story as far as the Battle of Brunanburh (in 937 AD) which, to my mind, is the event which creates England . . . beyond that? No!  Uhtred will be far too ancient.

 


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Q

So I am a huge fan of alternate history and historic fiction, and as such, absolutely devour your works with great relish, particularly the Uhtred sage.  Thus my big question - is there a foreseen end to the series?  I live in dread that some terrible circumstance might remove you from this mortal coil and leave us dangling in cliffhanger hell.  I realize this is entirely selfish, but after all, this series has been absolutely delightful in its quality, intrigue, pretty much everything.  While it may not define my life, whilst reading the series, I am consumed by it.  Good thing I only buy the hardcover copies, or I would be needing a new set of each by now...

 

Many thanks for enriching my literary life.

 

Chris Peskett

 

A

Trust me I live in dread that some terrible circumstance might remove me from this mortal coil!  So far (knock on wood) so good, and as we’re getting closer and closer to the Battle of Brunanburh it looks as if we both might live to see the end of the series. I’m working on it!


Q

Hello Bernard

 

I thought you might find this video mildly interesting...

https://youtu.be/TpYbZK_gEbc

I think i heard this guy right, that he  refers to Dragoons as, "Artillery"! That can't be right?

I wanted to ask about your "Sharpe Heavy Cavalry sword. Where did you get it? It was quite a find! And do you have any other cool Napoleonic Memorabilia?

 

Looking forward to reading Uhtred 11 this Christmas

 

Kind regards, as ever

 

Matt Copley

Wiltshire

A

Dragoons were not artillery, you’re right, but I suspect the phrase he uses is only slightly muddled. Dragoons, technically, were mounted infantry.  They rarely dismounted in battle, but certainly did so when they were on vedette duty – which was outpost work. I think the point being made was that the Imperial Guard was virtually a self-contained army corps in its own right, and thus contained infantry, cavalry and artillery.

 

I bought it years ago – too many to remember – in London.  I try not to clutter my wife’s life with too much memorabilia, but in my ‘office’ I have a (reproduction) Baker rifle, a tulwar from the early 19th Century, a Baker rifle sword bayonet and an East India Company bayonet. That’s enough!


Q

First, love the books and I’m biting my nails waiting for the new book coming. My question is, will you be pushing to offer the Last Kingdom series in leather bound versions? Or are they available as leather through someone? As good as they are it would be nice to have leather bound books to have on a coffee table to read. Or possibly a limited edition perhaps different than the hardcover possibly autographed. Just a thought. I would love them in a nice leather edition, thanks. Keep Uhtred coming!

Wayne Cottrill

A

I am not aware of plans for a leather bound edition....but who knows?  Maybe once the series is finished?


Q

Hi Bernard,

I  just finished reading the Nathaniel Starbuck series (btw had a serious laugh out loud gaffaw when I realized who Patrick Lassan was...) Anyhow I  just want to thank you for being the prolific author that you are. I started about a year ago with the Warlord series, and have seemed to move forward  (and sometimes backward) in time from that point.

So... I can see its been awhile since you have visited our friend Starbuck and was wondering if there are any plans to pick up on that series again. I realize you have been busy with Uhtred - looking forward to the War of the Wolf. Also, I am nearing the end of the Sharpe series...do you have any more plans for Richard and Patrick? I'm afraid I am going to be jonesing. ..

Sincerely,

Lori Richardson

A

There are many things still on my list....hopefully Sharpe (and maybe Starbuck)....


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell...

We absolutely love love your Saxon Chronicles and the tale of Uhtred of Bebbanburg- Thank you so much for this wonderful gift. We love to turn off the TV and awful news of the day and lose ourselves in this story.  We also were enthralled with your re-telling of Arthur through the eyes of Derfel. (I should note here that we have the audiobook versions so that we can 'read' as we drive). I don't know if you have any say in who reads your books for Audible, but the reader for many of the books has been Jonathan Keeble- and he is wonderful.  He has a wonderful sense of your words and your vision, and makes the stories and characters  come alive as the reader. We would love to have him as a reader for all of your books! Thank you again for the joy you bring in your story telling!

Eric Erwin and Beth Brookes

A

I do not have any input into choosing narrators of the audio books - but I am happy to pass along your message!


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Q

Hi Mr Cornwell,

I love all of your books but somewhat disappointed we'll see no more of Thomas of Hookton. Nevertheless, I can't wait until 2 Oct to find out what mischief Uhtred will be getting into.

My question; can you list out your best selling series in order of sales? I think it maybe the Sharpe series although with the program, I can see the Last Kingdom doing quite well.

Reg McAuley

A

I can't!  I don't keep track.  Maybe my publisher could?


Q

Dear Bernard

I love your books. I have devoured several series and your work has rekindled an interest in history that I had long forgotten I had. Next weekend I am going to an  Anglo Saxon exhibition and it is all thanks to Uhtred.

However, I am conscious that across your wide range of books, the central character is always male. This saddens me, because there have been some great, influential and interesting women in history (and that's just in the non-fiction section!) Admittedly feisty women in history weren't the norm, but then the likes of Sharpe, Uhtred and Derfel weren't run-of-the mill personalities either.

I would therefore like to know if you would ever consider putting a female character at the centre of one of your stories in the future?

Yours sincerely,

Clare

A

I have considered it, and even done a lot of research into that particular woman and her world, but will I write it and her?  I don’t know. A long life and a blissfully happy marriage has convinced me that women see the world differently to mere men.  I’m confident writing about the latter, but the former sometimes baffle me.  We write best (I think) when we write what we know about and women, much as I love them, are something of a mystery. In my defence I do try to make my female characters strong!  I’m always annoyed when, in films or TV, a couple are fleeing danger and the girl or woman always has to trip over and be rescued – why can’t the man or boy trip sometimes? In my books the women don’t fall over. A brownie point, please?

 


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I just had a few questions about Sigtryggr. If we mix the historical figure of Sithric Caech and the fictional Sigtryggr that you've created, is it safe to assume that Sigtryggr and Ragnall in the books are either the sons of the young Ivar who attempts to attack Uhtred at the end of "Lords of the North"? thus the grandsons of the Ivar that Uhtred kills at the end of the book, thus the great grandsons of Ivar the Boneless?

 

What year are we currently in at the end of "Flamebearer"? I'm currently reading the book for a second time in preperation for the release of "War of the Wolf" and upon my first reading took Uhtred's final interaction with Aethelflaed to mean that the book is set in 918, as the real Aethelflaed died in that year. Upon my second reading, I realized that Uhtred simply states that he never sees her again and there is no real indication that she dies soon after thier meeting.

 

Secondly, Is Einar the White Eiglaf the Red's son? Eiglaf had two young sons who would be in their early thirtys at this point in the storyline, or is the fact that he is named Einar Eiglafson and both are named after a color just a coincidence? If not, do you think we'll see the decendants of long dead charachters make a return, such as Eiglaf of Svien of the White Horse?

 

 

Also, on a totally unrelated topic, do you think Sharpe would have gotten along with Sgt Scammell?

 

Thank you for your time,

 

Luke Devine

A

I never intended Einar to be identified as Eiglaf’s son . . . he’s a convenient character, but I didn’t want to be trapped in historical reality, so kept him fictional. I don’t mind reality!  But the history of the north is so complicated and, to tell a story, needs to be ‘streamlined’. As you probably have foreseen I’m going to have a ton of trouble with Sigtryggr over the next couple of books – so the fictional pruning hook will be busy.

 

Most of the action is in 918 – but the end point? I deliberately left that vague.

 

I think he’d have ripped him a new one.

 


Q

Is Sharpe's father  Sir Henry Simmerson?

Chris Horsley

 

OK, I will have a go: For irony, Henry Simmerson.

Thank you for writing such fabulous and engaging novels - ranging from the Sharpe series, to the Arthur series, to Uhtred (and I also enjoyed the Rebel series and Azincourt, as well as the Fort).

PLEASE write another Sharpe novel soon.

All the best,

RJC

A

No!


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Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell!

My father and I are very devoted fans of much of your writing, so much so that it has very easily become something we bond over, as we can spend hours talking about the little details and history surrounding Uhtred of Bebbanburg, though he has definitely dwelled deeper into your content than I have.

 

I understand it is essentially pointless to send you book ideas or ideas about characters, though it’s important to note that I am not asking you to use my ideas in your writing. What I am asking is for you to consider writing a short book or story surrounding Cnut (Longsword) Ranulfson’s rise to fame as the greatest swordsman in all of Britain.

 

Of all the warriors Uhtred has fought, I feel that Cnut has become the most important of the series, as he is the only character who has nearly killed Uhtred, and he was the only character Uhtred fully expected to lose to in a fight, with the exception of Steapa. It’s my whole-hearted belief that Uhtred only succeeded because the gods were on his side, as he claimed Cnut was faster than Finan, a claim that I felt subtlety hinted that Finan would have fell to Cnut if he had stepped in for Uhtred (which he tried to do).

 

I know it’s a lot to ask you to write a whole book about one specific character, but I had just felt there was so much potential surrounding his uprising and his possession of Ice Spite, that it couldn’t hurt to ask.

 

Thank you so much for your work, I very much look forward to War of the Wolf.

Ollie

A

You’re right – it doesn’t hurt to ask, but I don’t see it happening soon, sorry.  If anything it would probably be a short story – but I need to finish Uhtred’s story first and there are a couple of other projects in the pipeline . . .


Q

dear Mr. Cornwell,

i'm a huge fan. if you don't mind my asking, will you write a book from Kublai Kahn/Marco Polo or Hannibal barca? themes of historical interest. My English is really bad, Sorry. I'm curious about it, how it goes on with Uhtred. Thor bless you!

Best regards from Germany

RT

A

Sorry, probably not . . . I have a slew of books I still want to write and, like Uhtred, I’m getting old!  Still, who knows?  Maybe one day I’ll get fascinated by Hannibal (more likely than Kublai Khan).

 


Q

Greetings Bernard.

I know so many people initiate their first messages with you by offering thanks for your work. I would like to do the same. I truly do love what you've written.

I have a few questions about reoccurring themes in your stories and where they came from.

First: "Fate is inexorable". This is mentioned in a lot of your writing. Where did you get the inspiration for it? What meaning does it have to You?

 

My other question: I've noticed as well that in the cases of Breeda for Uhtred and Nimue for Derfel, the narrator has a lover who he is not truly inlove with, but cares for deeply through childhood and into early  adult life, but this charecter then distances from him eventually to becoming an enemy, and a very degraded form of what he once loved.

Is this based on any real life expirience of yours? Where does that chain of events come from?

Thank you so much. I can't wait for your new release in October.

Kindest regards

Kjartan (not the cruel) Kelly

A

I’m afraid it doesn’t have any meaning for me . . . to believe in fate is to acknowledge a mysterious and, presumably, superior power, and I’m far too prosaic for such a belief. However, our medieval ancestors thoroughly believed in fate and the phrase comes from an Anglo Saxon poem, The Wanderer, which sums up that belief very neatly.

 

Again, no life experience!  Fiction!


Q

Hi Bernard

Fantastic news that the next Uhtred book is coming out later this year. Just in time for my 50th birthday a few days later. Apologies if I've missed it in the previous books, have you any plans to include the Weymouth Vikings in the tales? Sounds like the sort of incident our hero may have been involved with, or maybe he would have tried to prevent it?

Finally,  PLEASE continue the Starbuck chronicles, there's so much more to tell.

Keep up the good work.

Martin

A

Right now it’s not on the horizon – poor Uhtred has enough to sort out in the new book (and the next), but who knows?


Q

It has been interesting to read fan comments in various chat rooms regarding TV Uhtred. Of course, there are many book fans participating in these debates who have never been happy with the casting of Dreymon as Uhtred because he doesn't at all fit your description of him in the books. Another vein of recent debate is Uhtred's season 3 look. A number of official photos of cast in costume have been released, but none of them include Uhtred. Some folks have discovered photos during down time on the set of Uhtred with his hair sheered off, and that has upset an entire fan base. Some are clinging to the hope that extensions will be profusely used. Of course, no one really knows yet what Uhtred will look like in season 3, but you might be able to settle the "hair debate." Did they really cut off Uhtred's long hair and shave his head? If so, it's going to create a lot of flack from fans.

Jason Marcus

A

I was on the set a month ago and have pictures of Alexander looking enviably handsome, but I’m not going to share them!  Sorry!  I think he’s a superb Uhtred and if he’s slightly redefining the character, so what? Two for the price of one.  My only complaint is that in Episode 7 of the new series (coming in the autumn) he kills a character called Beornheard – does the man have no gratitude?


Q

I've often pondered on the similarities between Uhtred and Derfel Cadarn, and the similarites between Alfred of Wessex and Arthur of Dumnonia, as well as their differences. In your opinion, if Derfel was transported to 9th century Britain, would he have liked Alfred? Would he have been as successful as Uhtred in fighting the Danes? Similarly, if Uhtred was in 5th century Britain, would he like Arthur? Would he have been more antagonistic towards Mordred? And if Arthur had to defend against invading Danes, would he have been as successful in protecting Britain as Alfred was?

Chris Jarvina

A

Would Arthur have succeeded against the Danes?  In essence he was facing the same problem as Alfred – resisting a migratory invasion, in Arthur’s case it was Anglo-Saxons and, according to the very scant evidence (and adding a deal of imagination) it appears he was very successful, but only for a time. He held up the loss of Britain, but couldn’t prevent it. Alfred did the same, only the outcome was different – and his successors established an English state. Beyond that the comparisons are really impossible. . . would Derfel have liked Alfred?  Probably more than Uhtred did!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell.

I would like to thank you for giving me the pleasure of reading back. I devoured the 10 books of the Uthred Saga in about 4 months and can hardly wait for band 11.

I want you, unlike others, do not ask when it's finally going on, but ask if you're still planning to write stories that tell Uhtred's life in between?

With thanks again and best regards from Germany

Casten

 

I am one of your legion of fans,  in my opinion you are the best historical fiction writer ever.  I cannot wait for the next book in a series but devastated when that series ends.   I have been seriously ill over the winter and fear I will not get to read the finale of Uhtred's wonderful adventures.   No publication last year, dare we hope for one this year?    If so I will try and keep going.

Yours in admiration

Norman Allen

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

can we expect another sequence after the flame bearer? Life is boring without Uthred 😪

Helmut Augener

A

The next book of the series is written!  It will be called War of the Wolf and will be published in October.


Q

When will we hear from Starbuck again?

Bill Horner

 

Mr Cornwell,

I find all your books wonderful and am very pleased to hear that Uhtred's adventures will continue.  I appreciate you are a very busy man but will Starbuck be seeing the war through to a conclusion?

Many thanks

Gavin Johnson

A

I just don't know when (or if??) I'll get back to Starbuck....


Q

Hi Bernard,

Have always been a fan of yours and having just finished the grail quest It was the death of a Robbie Douglas a death I did not expect that I found myself wondering what is your process for killing a character off? I remember reading you regretted killing Hakeswell off. Do you decide before writing, do you let the story decide or do you feel you can’t go any further with that character?

Keep up the good work can’t wait for the next Uhtred book.  Any chance of you letting the title slip so we can all have I guess at what’s going to happen?

Jim

 

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

Isn't it about time for you to reveal the proposed title of Uhtred #11?

Alan Kempner

A

I never decide anything before writing . . . the story unfolds as you write it, and usually those deaths help the plot which is why they’re there. I often regret them, but leave them in!

 

It is. Almost there . . . . .

 

 


Q

Hello Bernard

First I’d like to thank you for The Saxon stories, I’ve read them again and again, luckily I live inNewcastle upon Tyne so I often visit Bamburgh Castle, somewhere down the line I’m related to 10th century Uhtred, so we are perhaps very distant cousins. My question is regarding Simmerson, when you wrote the character did you every think or base him on the character or the style of TT , Terry Thomas?

Thanks Mathew

Ps will you be doing anything in Newcastle this year?

A

Oh lord no!  I liked Terry Thomas!

I don't think so....


Q

Hi there,

I suspect I'm one of your younger readers, considering I started reading the books earlier than would be regarded normal (19 and I first read 'The Last Kingdom' at 12), so I suppose you could say that I've grown up with Uhtred. The series, along with many of your other works, has inspired a lot of my own interest in writing and by proxy acting, two of the paths I'm now trying to pursue. So for that I'd just like to say I'm grateful. I have a couple of quick questions and would love to hear from you.Now my first question is a bit of an odd one, but I've always been curious about Eadith: why does Uhtred speak so little of her when he refers to himself as an old man? He talks about Gisela and Ætheflaed and even Iseult, but I don't think he's ever mentioned Eadith, unless (and I think not?) she is the pious Christian wife that he refers to with contempt. At this point (post 'The Flame Bearer'), he's been with her for as many books and almost as much time seemingly as anyone else, and yet she's still seldom mentioned. I understand that in earlier books she may not have been a fully-fledged character in your plans, but by now she is a close companion of Uhtred's and yet seemingly remains relegated to second tier in his affections. I suppose I'm just curious as to why?

Secondly, (more brief this one) Uhtred and Cnut fighting each other in their prime in a fair fight: who wins? I would assume Uhtred based on his victory as an old man (by relative standards), but he used his ingenuity rather than ability to defeat Cnut on that occasion.

Finally, as a writer myself (don't worry I'm not going to send you a screenplay!), I'd be curious to know, with a long form series of books like yours (for which I think 'The Saxon Stories' is the correct term but I'm still uncertain), how many books in advance do you plan? Did you know the general shape for the whole arc before you began, or does each story build mostly off what has come before?

I know that I've asked more than my fair share, but as I say, I've had so many questions and only just discovered (whilst sat re-watching season 2 on Netflix) that the option to contact you was available. I hope to hear from you soon, and in the meantime: keep them coming! I hope Uhtred and co have many more adventures ahead!

Will

A

I think it’s simply because he doesn’t spend much time with her!  There’s nothing sinister in it – they’re happy!  For now.

Uhtred. Of course!

Well,  there's no master-plan. I do have inklings of what might be ahead but beyond that I leave it to the imagination as a book gets written.  Probably the wrong way to do it, but there you go!

 

 


Q

I have read all 10 books in the series. Now that he is home, how soon can we read about Uhtred’s last unfulfilled goal- to unite all of Britain? Also just read Fools and Mortals. As someone who taught Shakespeare for 32 years, I loved your take on his personality and your insight into the living theatre of the day (a concept hard for students to imagine). Thanks

Kevan Exstrum

 

Do you plan to release Book # 11?  If so when can we expect it?

Tootsie North

 

When is the next (11th) Utred book coming out?

Al Lenzi

 

Mr Cornwell

Will you be writing another novel in The Last Kingdom series?

Paul McInnis

A

I am working on the 11th book of The Last Kingdom series now.  It should be available - in both the UK and the US - on 9 October 2018.


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Q

Hi Bernard,

long-time fan here. I'm working my way through Uhtred's story, trying to catch up with the TV series before it comes back, and puzzling over Sharpe's father in the meantime. I believe I have it: Major Patrick Ferguson, inventor of the breech-loading rifle. 8 letters, aged 33 in 1777, and it's got a U in it for good measure... am I anywhere near?

Howard Train

A

Miles away! Nice thought, but oh so wrong!


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell.

Now that we know season 3 of TLK is really happening, and you'll be making a cameo appearance, can you give us a hint as to in which episode you will be appearing? With makeup artists being as good as they are, I surely wouldn't want to miss your appearance as using eyeglasses to help identify you will obviously not be of much assistance!

If you've already been filmed, I imagine the experience was quite a hoot for you and I'm hoping Uhtred's (desired) insult was a doozy! If so, were you allowed a pithy retort?

Jason Marcus

A

I appear (unless I end on the cutting room floor) in episode 7. It was, indeed, a hoot. I won’t say what Uhtred does to me on camera, but off camera we had a terrific time.

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

After having read the Warlord and Saxon series, I'm interested in your thoughts of the relative efficiency of the Roman legionary infantry (at the height of their prowess) compared to the British / Saxon / Danish infantry.  I have always been interested in the Roman period, and based on what I've read, it seems like the Roman heavy infantry were the pinnacle of close combat warfare.  With large shields, short stabbing swords, heavy armor, organization, and discipline, they would set the standard for all that came after.  Granted, that the Romans lost plenty of battles, but I'm sure they won abundantly more, so that it was something of a shock when they lost.

Compared to Uhtred, leading a couple thousand men into battle, and with only a few hundred of those well armed, armored, and trained, the commander of a couple of Roman cohorts would be at an almost insurmountable advantage. Mated with the quality of troops, to have a logistical system in place so they are capable of operating year round far from home, it must seem like a race of giants to Alfred's Wessex.

I know you don't want any ideas for books, but I personally would love to read a few books of your that covered this topic.

Love your books.  Thanks.

Andrew Mileur

A

I won’t disagree with you – but again, it’s one of those hypothetical situations – we just don’t know!

 


Q

I have all 10 of the Saxon Chronicles...are there any more books in this series? Or will there be?

Sheila Hall

 

Hi, I can't believe that Flame Bearer is the end of Uhtred! When can I look for the next step? I love this series and have seen the 2 available seasons on Netflix and read all the Saxon Tales at least twice! Thanks for this!

Max Hoyle

 

 

I loved the Sharpe books, reading all of them after completing Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin from the same historical period.  I have now read all 10 Saxon novels.  Uhtred has retaken Bebbanberg, is this now the end of his story??

Paul Olsen

A

The 11th book of The Last Kingdom series will be released in the UK and the US later this year.  And Season 3 of the tv series is currently being filmed.


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have a specific question about one of your Uhtred books. I think Uhtred said that they call the morning star “Aerendil.” I don’t remember which book because I listened to them last year but I would guess 7 or 8. Is this a nod to JRR Tolkien? I have searched online and as far as I can tell, the morning Star is only called Aerendil in Tolkien’s Middle Earth. I know he based his creations largely on his studies of the Dark Age Saxons so maybe it was really called that. Thank you for your time.

Dan

A

I believe the Germanic peoples called the morning start Aerendil – and I suspect that’s where Tolkien found the name.


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell

My son and I were fortunate enough to attend your talk in 2017 in Ely. I think the rumour mill was already in full swing when we did and even though we were there to listen to you speak on Fools and Mortals, the prospect of an eleventh Uhtred book was great news. You have already said that you are currently working on book 11, will you be visiting the UK this year to promote it? If yes, do you have any dates in mind and venues?

Thanks

Terry

A

I believe the book will be published on October 4th so I suspect it will be around that time.  Don't know the venues yet, but once we know it will be posted to the homepage of this website.


Q

Bernard,

Firstly can I thank you for all of your wonderful books and characters? I read my first (Sharpe's Regiment) in 1993 when I was 11 and I visited Salamanca accompanied by Sharpe's Sword last week. Having read at least once every book you have written.

I do have a question though, will Nate Starbuck ever march again? The historical note in the last book said he would but he hasn't so far. And I view them as an extension of the Sharpe books (particularly with his son in them - a wonderful touch)

This isn't to say that I don't love the Saxon books, merely that I'm keen to read more Starbuck.

My girlfriend by the way laughs at me because she thinks much of my morality and my attitude to religion and authority may be led by Sharpe, Uhtred and others.

Anyway, all the best and thank you so much for all the hours and hours of pleasure your books have given me over the last 25 years.

Anthony

 

Hi Bernard

Love your books and have reading them as they are released ever since the Sharp novels, however the Starbuck Chronicles finishes in the middle of nowhere and I wanted to ask if you were going to write any more as there is still quite a bit of Civil War left.

Trevor Bracken

 

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

is there a possibility that the 5th part of Starbuck appears? That would be great! :)

Sincerely

Tim Skotara

A

There is a possibility....


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell.

I'm going to make a prediction but it isn't one I like. I think season 3 of the TV series of TLK will be the last. Here is why I think so.

First, they have asked you to make a cameo appearance. Why would they do that when they are only just over half-way through this series of books?

Second, I think Stephen Butchard has done an excellent job writing the scripts for TLK, but I also think he wrote himself into a bit of a corner. The relationship between Uhtred and Alfred has been presented so powerfully, who is going to fill that void after Alfred dies? There isn't another character they can pull from that had such an important impact on Uhtred's life. Readers, of course, are still very interested in what goes on with Uhtred after Alfred, but how does the TV show replace that dynamic relationship?

Third, because I like the way the show has been written, I did a little research on Stephen Butchard to find out what other projects he has been involved with. On his CV it is listed that season 3 will have 10 episodes instead of the usual 8. Hmmm. In conjunction with the two thoughts above, I think the extra two episodes are going to finish Uhtred's story as far as the TV series is concerned by pulling out a few events from successive books and placing them after book 6. It would neatly wrap up the TV version of Uhtred's life by giving the viewers what they would want: Uhtred offs his uncle and finally reclaims Bebbanburg.

I will be greatly disappointed if season 3 is the last of TLK, but things are just a bit too coincidental for my liking. In the world of TV entertainment, viewers have often been greatly disappointed when a great series ends before its time. Uhtred is a very interesting character to read about, and certainly one interesting enough to watch since his character has been written so well by Mr. Butchard and excellently portrayed by Alexander Dreymon.

Thoughts on my prediction?

Jason Marcus

A

I don’t have any thoughts on it!  You might be right, you might not be!  I doubt that the ‘cameo’ has anything to do with it – that was really Alexander’s idea. I suspect the fate of the series is entirely dependent on viewing figures – and we don’t have a clue what those might be, of course.

 


Q

Dear Bernard Cornwell

I am a big fan of your books, especially the Sharpe series. I read through the collection in record time and fell in love with the way you develop your characters, the way you create lovable rogues is truly impressive. Having finished Sharpe I read most of your other books before discovering Starbucks Chronicles and I was hooked, I understand that you are currently writing the Saxon series and that clashing with writing Sharpe and Starbuck at the same time meant Starbuck had to be put on hold, but I am just curious that once you have finished with Uhtreds story, will it be possible for us to see Starbuck march again? Thank you for all your work and your time.

Kind Regards

Ashton Perry

A

I don't know what will be next....


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I'm an avid  reader of your books and especially the Last Kingdom series.  I love the characters in the books and especially Uhtred, the main character.  I was wondering if there would be a book following the Flame Bearer?  If that is the case, when will it be available?  I know Uhtred is now an old man but his son would also make a wonderful character for a follow up.

Thank you sir,

Claude Gauthier

 

When will the 11th book in the Saxon Chronicles be release?  Have all ten books and looking forward to the next one.

Tootsie North

A

It is the book I am writing now, so - with any luck - you should have it later this year.


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Q

Firstly, thank you for all the hours of pleasure your books have given me.

I was wondering, reading a response to a previous question, whether the wife Uhtred speaks of when he is old, frail and retelling his story, is in fact Mildrith.  They would still be married as you never mention them as being divorced. She was/is pious and would probably surround herself with priests.  Is this a guess too far?

Really looking forward to book 11.

Thank you again

Ann

A

For Uhtred? Yes, a guess too far! We’ll get there in the end.


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell.

Thank you for answering the question regarding Uhtred's age when he finally takes back Bebbanburg. He is old. That could cover a lot of years since in the books anyone over 40 is considered old. I suppose readers get wound up with characters, especially ones that have had more than their share of hard knocks. All Uhtred really wanted was to go home, eh? How long did it take him to achieve his dream? 40, 50, 60 years? I guess we'll never know.

Is there a chance the BBC will get in gear and renew TLK? Having such long stretches between seasons, as well as leaving viewers hanging, is really not the way to gain and retain viewers. While the TV series alters your story quite a bit, it is still a gem of a TV series and has prompted many people to read all of the books in the series for a more in-depth look at the myriad of interesting characters and events.

Kind regards. Looking forward to both book 11 and, hopefully, season 3 of the TV series.

Jason Marcus

I forgot to mention that I have really enjoyed the humor in the books. Some situations are not very PC in today's world so I suppose I shouldn't have been laughing out loud, but I did anyway. One of my favorite interactions between Uhtred and Finan (I forget which book) and the five things that keep a man happy. Absolutely hilarious. Love the interaction between those two characters.

A

Thank you!  And yes, the show will return for season 3 – on Netflix – probably this autumn.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

Your Saxon chronicle books are so good, I have read them multiple times.  The Flamebearer was even better - you are getting more skillful.  When is the next one going to be available?  Your book 1356 was good, but your Saxon books are by far your greatest gold mine for sheer reading entertainment.

Kevin

 

I have not yet read the tenth book in the Last Kingdom series...before I do will there be an eleventh? Otherwise I will save #10 for a special occasion.

Peter Hand

 

When will the next release of the last kingdom be released? Uhtred' s story is far from complete....it's been too long now I need to know will he ever regain his promise land home and how he finally sits on the Northumbrian northern throne

Michael Wood

 

When will you release a new book in the Saxon Chronicles?  I really have enjoyed reading this series.

Ed North

A

I am writing book #11 now.  Hope to have it ready for publication later this year.


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

 

I am a huge fan of your writing and especially the Last Kingdom Series. Uhtred is one of my favourite characters, however I have also become a big fan of his Irish companion and friend Finan, and I was wondering whether you would be writing anything from his point of view, why he was exiled in more detail. Or more about his life before his exile?

Thank you very much for providing such good reading!

George

A

Not sure....maybe??


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Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell.

I have really enjoyed reading The Last Kingdom series and look forward to reading book 11. I do, however, have a question. I saw a post by another reader about Uhtred's age during various time periods and it starts to get muddy around book 7/8 because the age of other characters and the timeline of events, etc. occasionally don't match up. Although that isn't a big issue for me, I would like to know, how old Uhtred is, in your mind, when he finally takes back Bebbanburg in book 10. When I read books 7-10 and try to keep track, it appears they only cover about seven years of Uhtred's life (902-909), which would put him in his early 50s, but I have no real idea. Could you clarify? Thanks much.

Jason Marcus

A

Not really. He’s old. I’m deliberately keeping it vague. I can’t remember how old I am either.


Q

My Question is short one will we ever get to read  about Mildrith in your books  (last kingdom books) again?  She was my favourite of Uhtred's ladies

John Gray

A

I’m afraid she’s probably the least favourite of Uhtred! I won’t say we’ll never see her again, so maybe??

 


Q

I'm sure you get this kind of message all the time but will we be reading more of Uhtred anytime soon? Also you put a line in the book when Uhtred finds Berg and said that he doesn't know but he's just completed Alfred's dream of England. What did you mean by Berg is the completion of England?

Andrew Eades

A

I am writing the next book of Uhtred's tale now, so......wait and see!


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell!

 

I just finished The Flamebearer today and absolutely love the Uhtred series. One thing that I’ve wondered is where you get your information on 10th Century Christianity. Since everything is narrated through Uhtred’s pagan voice I’m not surprised by the negative picture painted of the church, but was curious how much you believe to be accurate how much is invention.

 

Thanks for taking the time!

-Lee

A

The church has always suffered from corruption, and that isn’t a sneer or condemnation. The church attracted wealth and wealth begets greed, and it also attracted ambitious and clever men who could not rise in the civil hierarchy (which was dominated by an aristocracy) but could rise within the ranks of the church. That went on for centuries and, for all I know, still goes on. But the church also attracted men and women of humility, piety and charity, and I try to offer you some of those as well as the more colourful rogues.

 


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell:

First, I want to thank you for your wonderful books. Uhtred (my favorite) is such a wonderfully flawed, noble character!

Speaking of wonderfully flawed, noble characters - have you considered writing anything about Boudicca? My daughter and I both deeply admire her. I’ve read historical fiction featuring Boudicca, as well as biographies and other non-fiction books and articles. As is typical of the period, we have only the brief accounts by Tacitus and Cassius Dio as (somewhat) contemporaneous sources.

It would be wonderful to have you write a series of books set during the period of the Roman conquest of Britain, which would include (of necessity, I think) Boudicca’s story. Your dedication to research and historical accuracy in your writing is unparalleled. If you haven’t already considered writing about this time period, I hope you will.

Alice Greene

 

A

I probably won't write a book about Boudicca. I'm sure it could be an interesting story, but I've too many other things on my list at the moment!


Q

Hi,

I just wanted to write a quick thank you for all the amazing books you have produced. The first book I read of yours was Agincourt, I was loaned the book by my Grandmother who recently passed. Since then, I came to love the Uhtred series, reading them all back-to-back. I then proceeded to read the Arthur books. I have recently been  churning through the Sharpe series, having just finished Sharpe's sword. I was also thrilled to see Uhtred make it onto our TV screens, but alas I can not explain to my brother how much better the books are- not that it hasn't brought me immense pleasure to see Uhtred in the flesh, and also to watch the series. I saw on a recent reply of yours that you have no objection to games, I wonder if you have ever played Crusader Kings 2 by Paradox Interactive? They have an Old Gods DLC which focuses heavily on the Viking invasions of Britain during the same period as the books. I greatly look forward to finishing the Sharpe series, but more importantly- reading the new Uhtred book which I hope comes out this year above all things else. It is my last desire to place any sense of pressure on you as you write the novel, but I beg you to end my misery by announcing a release date soon :)

 

Kind Regards

George

 

P.S. Your books have inspired my love of Saxon and Napoleonic history!

A

Sorry for the loss of your Grandmother.

I haven’t played it.  And I do hope the release date of my next book will be later this year!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

For the last thirty years or so, being more precise would be far too alarming, you have provided me great pleasure  by writing novels that I have read over many times. I believe I have a copy of every one published, mostly in paperback, I have watched and enjoyed the productions of Sharpe and of the last Kingdom. I am a fan. And I also was born in Essex.

Enough of the flattery, sincere though it is. My reason for contacting you is concerning the Oriflamme and its fate. I appreciate that there were many produced, that some were destroyed, but also surely some were captured, What happened to them? I have tried to find out bit apart from some reference to one being destroyed in the French Revolution can find no reference to any still in existence.

So I write to you, on whom I place the responsibility for my curiosity, in the hope that you will be able to spare the time to satisfy it.

In any event let me pass on my sincere thanks for conjuring up Sharpe, Harper, Thomas and Uhtred as well as all the other memorable characters you have created.

Regards,

Bryan Mansfield

A

I know of at least two that were captured – I assume they vanished into the English court? Who knows? Made into cushions?

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell

 

Since I first read "The last Kingdom", I am a big fan of your work, especially of the Saxon stories and the Sharpe books.

I am working on maps and chronologies of anglo-saxon history and therefore I was very glad, how historical well researched your books are. This is also the reason, why I wanted to locate your novels in my timeline of anglo-saxon history. But, especially in the last novels, I had some trouble locating the novels exactly.

Here is my actual chronology of your books:

The Last Kingdom 866-876 AD

The Pale Horseman 876-878 AD

The Lords of the North 878-881 AD

Sword Song 886 AD

The Burning Land 892-? AD

Death of Kings 899-902 (?) AD

The Pagan Lord ?911? AD

The Empty Throne 911-? AD

Warriors of Storm ?-? AD

The Flame Bearer ?-917? AD

Would it be possible to help me locate your novels exactly and complete this list? Especially with the last three books I had some trouble in locating them exactly, because they have also fictional events in them.

What are the exact birth years of the three children of Uhtred?

Thank you very much for answering my questions. I hope my English wasn't to bad, as I am from Switzerland.

I would also like to thank you for writing this wonderful books and enriching my Bookshelf with great works. I am looking forward for the 11th book of the Saxon stories in October.

 

Yours sincerly

Michael H.

A

I wish you hadn’t asked those questions, because I don’t have a clue what dates Uhtred’s children were born, and I deliberately keep the dates of some of the books a little misty (like the one I’m writing now, which is probably set in 922, but certainly before 924 AD). Your dates look right to me, but I’d need to reread all of them to find whatever clues I dropped and, forgive me, I’d rather write the new book!


Q

Hi again Mr. Cornwell.

Is it at all likely that we'll get another Sharpe novel before you've finished the last of Uhtred's saga?

Alan Kempner

A

I think it’s likely you’ll get another Sharpe novel, but before the end of Uhtred? I can’t promise that. Maybe just after?

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I am an avid reader of your books and absolutely love the character Uhtred of Bebbanburg but I am also a big lover of the total war games, with the incoming release of Total War Saga: Kings of Britannia I wonder if Uhtred might have either a game of his own at some point or have a cameo in this new game that takes place during the rule of Alfred?

Sincerely

John Clapp

A

I don't object to video games - but I know nothing of developing them so it's up to someone else to do it!


Q

I love The Saxon Chronicles/The Last Kingdom series. I’ve read each of the ten books at least four times, and have watched the television series on Netflix multiple times as well. I’m looking forward to seeing Uhtred’s story continued in your next book this fall, and I’m keeping my fingers crossed that a third season of The Last Kingdom is coming soon. Thank you so much for sharing your extraordinary gifts with the world!

 

In Uhtred’s narration, he speaks of his advanced age, ailments, etc., before recalling the story he wishes to tell. He also mentions his “newest” wife at his advanced age, describing her as overly pious, overly fond of priests, and idiotic. Why would Uhtred marry such a woman?! I hope you will explain it soon because it seems so out of character. Thank you.

Alice Greene

A

I’ll explain it when the books reach that point – not till then, sorry!

 


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Q

Sir, good day! I'd like to say that I greatly admire, among other characters, Cnut Ranulfson. He is Uhtred's most dangerous, competent and sort of noble opponent, who is basically sort of Uhtred on the other side. I'd like to know, whether you based him on any particular historical figure and whether there is a chance that we will get to meet his son.

 

Thanks for your time.

Artem

A

I think he sprang from my imagination . . .


Q

Hi Bernard,

 

Love your books; they have stolen hours and hours away from many nights sleep and they were well worth it!

 

I was having a conversation with family the other day and we were discussing the English classes from school which alleged that the colour of curtains or other things of that nature set a particular tone. I wondered whether you ever deliberately write things of that nature into your books and when young people learn about Bernard Cornwell's books what will be the frequent methods you use to build mood into your stories?

 

Also, if the answer above would be yes, what colour curtains would Uhtred, Sharpe or Derfel have (assuming they had a sudden urge to have them!)?

 

Thanks,

Tom

A

Good Lord, I have no idea!  I’m pretty sure I never use furnishings to indicate mood. That would be a bit limiting. If Sharpe’s mood changed then he’d have to call in the furniture removal people, then an interior decorator and really, he wouldn’t be bothered. I suspect I’m much more straightforward and just tell you what their mood is and the curtains can look after themselves. I did once start a chapter ‘Sharpe was in a good mood’ and, though I don’t believe in writer’s block, that phrase stopped me dead. It never appeared in print.

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

Just finished The Flame Bearer and have to say thank you for such an enjoyable series of books. Any idea when the 11th will be published and have you heard anything about The Last Kingdom Series 3? Is it happening?

Martin Doherty

 

Hi! I recently discovered the tv series and then the book series. Watched/bought them all and loved every single one.

After reading the 10th novel, I'm wondering if there will be any more books or was that the last we will see of Uhtred ??

Thank you so much for writing historical novels.

Kevin Caillouet

A

I am writing the 11th book now.  Hope to have it ready for publication in September or October.

Haven't heard any news about Season 3.....but hope to soon!


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Hello B.C.

 

Greetings from Brazil.

 

Will Uhtreds (Son and Father) be part of the  Battle of Brunanburh?

 

My best regards

 

Bruno Martins

A

They will!


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Hi, I'm a big fan from Brazil and I would like to know how many books will have the saga of Uhtred?

Thank you for all you have done.

Lorran

A

I don't know....at least a few more!


Q

I have been enthralled with  History of the British Isles for most of my life (83 yrs)  i acquired the 10 books of the series just before xmas and am now on the "the Empty Throne"  Your style of  writing is very easy to follow and so I have had a difficulty in putting them down.  My question is; is there a book following number 10.  the last line implies that Uhtred will ride again.

Willie T.

 

Just wondering if you have more books in the pipeline to follow the Flame Bearer. I have found these really riveting and true to life (as I would imagine it), and really want to know if Utred finally retakes Bebbanburgh.

Cheers,

David

 

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

Please could you let me know when book 11 will be released of the Last Kingdom series?

Thanks,

Jenny

 

 

11th book?

Please.....

John M Clements

A

I am writing the 11th book now - hopefully we'll see it published in October of this year!


Q

Will Uhtred see Athelstan as King of England?

John Hough

A

He will!


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Greetings Mr. Cornwell.

I hope you had a great new year, and hope it will be a good year for you! I wanted to ask you in regards to Saxon Chronicles, I've got the word that the 11th book is indeed coming, but I am wondering if it will be the last. Hopefully not, as according to my calculations, Uhtred is 60 and, since he was born in 857 AD, the 10th book was set in 917 AD. Until the Battle of Brunanburh, there are 20 more years ahead, so still some long time to consolidate and answer a few more questions, such as the power gap of Æthelflaed after she dies, the deaths of long Edward and his son Ælfweard in 924 AD and the succession crisis which Æthelstan will have to endure, the consolidation of England in 927 AD and finally the Battle of Brunanburh itself, in 937 AD. I believe there is enough material for at least four more books. Do you plan on doing something like this in order to finish the saga?

 

Much appreciated for your attention,

Patrick

A

The 11th won’t be the last, and you’ve very cleverly anticipated two of the coming books – but not the twelfth, which is half written. So yes, more to come!

 


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

So now that Fools and Mortals is done, are you probably going to focus on Uhtred and nothing else until his story is finished?

Alan Kempner

A

‘Concentrate’? No. but I’m writing the next Uhtred story right now and have every intention of finishing his saga, but might well take another break to write something different before it’s done. I don’t know! I’ll decide what’s next when I’ve finished the book I’m writing now.

 


Q

Happy New Year Mr Cornwell.

Except for the Sharpe books, I’ve read all of you others. Many of the one-off books have left me yearning for follow up like The Gallows Thief. The Saxon Tales are my favorite and after watching season one and two of the Last Kingdom, I’ve gone back and re-read the stories.

My hope is that there will be a third series produced and Uhtred will return on screen. Can you provide hope for the New Year?

I have my order in for you newest release

Melissa Colbert

 

I love reading all your books and have enjoyed many hours of pleasure at your hand, so thank you. After reading the Last Kingdom series I got into the BBC adaption and I was intrigued by the actors chosen to play your beloved characters. Will the series be renewed for a 3rd season?

Jamie Samuels

 

Mr. Cornwell,

When will the next season of The Last Kingdom be released?

Eric Anderson

A

We haven't gotten official word yet - but we are hopeful!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I just have to take a moment to praise you for what I've read so far.  I started with the Last Kingdom series (can't wait for the next installments), moved on to the Warlord Chronicles (these are my favorite so far), and now am working my way through The Grail Quest.

I have 2 questions for you:

 

  1. Who would win in a 1v1 fight, Uhtred or Derfel?

 

  1. I think your Warlord Chronicles would make a great movie trilogy. Do you ever think this will happen?

Wish you all the best,

Mike Sheeran

 

Dear Bernard

Without doubt,your trilogy of Arthur are the finest books I have ever read and deserve to grace the big screen.

Is there a possibility this could happen?

Lord of the Rings would be sent to the otherworld!

Thank you for your fantastic work.

Kind Regards

Shaun Bennett

A

No idea!  A draw!

I guess it's possible - but not likely


Q

Have you plans for Uhtred?

Keen to know from the Flame Bearer.

And, sorry, yes I am a fan....

Good fortune in 2018 !!!

John M Clements

 

I am almost done with The Last Kingdom series, and I have enjoyed the adventures of Uhtred. So, I must know when will there be another book in the series? I need to know if he will obtain Bebbanburg! I love you work. Your Sharpe series was the first series of books I tackled reading. I was thirteen years old. Anyways, I digress...

Thanks so much ,

Olivia Linn

 

I have now completed all of the Saxon Tales, and was wondering if you planned on finishing this series, with the retaking of Bebbanburg.

George Williams

A

There will be a new Uhtred book in 2018!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I am a huge fan of both the Warlord and Saxon Stories series; for me, the best things about the books are the characters and the attention to historical detail. When I came to watch the Last Kingdom, I was very impressed with the former, with the casting being excellent across the board. Similarly, a great deal of effort had obviously been made with regard to historical details such as the use of languages similar to Old Norse on the soundtrack. This made the depiction of the Saxon shields stand out even more - shield walls play such a big part in Uhtred's story that the decision to portray the Saxons with rectangular and kite shields seemed odd. The only reason I could think for this was to provide viewers with an easy visual differentiation between Vikings and Saxons during the battle scenes. As both a writer and a military historian, where do you stand on the balance between aesthetics and accuracy when your works are transferred to the screen?

Matthew Walker


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Hello,  I've never written to you before but am a huge fan. One this that has interested me as a follower of medieval history and ancient history is the heights of people in the past. Uhtred is often mentioned as being very tall and his sidekick Finan is described as more slight and I don't remember anything about Alfred's height. I was wondering how tall you envisaged each of the three. If their heights are mentioned in the book, I apologise,

 

Merry Christmas

 

David

A

I think I should apologise because I can’t remember if I ever specified a height for Alfred. Let’s just say he was ‘medium height’. There, will that do?

 


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

My wife & I love Uhtred!  Truly.  Have all 10 novels.  Sharpe & Sir Thomas as well, but, Uhtred is our favorite character . . . we suspect Uhtred is mostly . . . well . . . You!

 

My ancestor was Breton Knight Wigot (2nd born) who became deBigot a landless knight loyal and renamed by Duke William, who fought for the Duke of Normandy even before the Battle of Hastings (Senlac Hill).  History records that as William "toured" England securing the kingdom after 1066, he "dropped" my ancestor off to guard the crossing of the River Dee in Chester.  My ancestor was de Bigot which through time became John Alford (Aldeford) . . . 15 generations later, family name came to America.

 

When researching the Battle of Hastings, I was intrigued that no one of your ilk has ever attempted to enrich this important moment in history.  Just a question is all.

 

With unfailing respect,

Timothy L. Long, MBA & Donna K. Newberg-Long, Ph.D.

A

Hastings is possible, but truthfully, it's not high on my list.


Q

Is The Flamebearer the final novel in the Saxon Tales series, or will there be more? There are still many questions to be asked and answered, I feel. I am enjoying these books very much, and would be sorry to see them end.

Thank you.

Phyllis Schmutz

 

 

When will the next book in the Last Kingdom series be released?  Looking forward to the next installment.

Rosemary Quast

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I recently saw the second season of The Last Kingdom. Thoroughly enjoyed it. After watching several episodes of the new season, I remarked to my wife something to the effect of, "This is great stuff; it's almost like a Bernard Conwell book!" And sure enough, once I stuck around long enough to read the credits... So over the last couple of months, everything I was reading got shoved to the back of the nightstand, and Uhtred and I have been marching all over Wessex, Mercia and now Northumbia. But now that we're all safely ensconced in Babbenburg, I need to know how long we'll have to wait to find out what's next! :-) Any timetable for the next book in the Saxon Tales?

I must say that after several years, it's been great jumping in to a (new to me) Cornwell series! It's been like gettin a visit from an old friend.

J D Hill

A

I am writing the next book of the series right now!


Q

I’ve just finished Fools and Mortals and I’d like to thank you for doing more for my appreciation of Shakespeare in a few days than a series of school teachers managed in the corresponding number of years, albeit a bit late for me to re-sit that O-level. I gathered from an earlier answer you gave that you see this as a one off rather than a new series, but I’d certainly read more about Richard’s progress if you happen to feel like writing more about him at some point. You make a couple of references to productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream you’ve been involved in. Can I ask which part(s) you’ve played in it? Also, did much of the characters of the actors you worked with find its way into the characters of the actors in your book? Looking forward to the next instalment of Uhtred in 2018 and whatever you decide to do after that!

Tony Mills

A

I confess that one actor in the book is a portrait of someone I’ve often worked with – Alan Rust.  Otherwise? Well, a few people (Widow Morrison, Phil the musician and Walter Harrison) will recognize themselves!  I’ve performed in the Dream twice . . . both times as Peter Quince . . .and will again on January 13th at the Dock Street Theatre in Charleston, SC.

 


Q

I love reading all about Uhtred. I have read every book plus own most of the series. I also have been watching The Last Kingdom series, I was a little disappointed when they didn't say anything about the arm rings or didn't explain the naming of his sword, minor details I know but important to his story. I would like to know if there will be an eleventh book? I have loved this story,and wait for more. Thank you for such a captivating story.

Kathy

 

Your postscript in the Flame Bearer indicates we are not done.  Will There be more?

Vince Saccardi

A

I am writing the eleventh book now!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I'm a huge fan of Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories. Uhtred's character truly fascinate me as a conflicted warrior in such a prominent time in the history of England. You mentioned that you are planning to write 2 more books, will the end of Uhtred be the end of the saga or would you consider writing it from his son Uhtred's perspective? Thank you for your wonderful books, they are such a joy to read.

Best regards from Australia.

Wendy

A

I suspect I’ll keep writing from Uhtred’s point of view. He and I are used to each other. I hope there will be more than two books!  I’m working on one right now . . . . .


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Dear Bernard Cornwell,

Reading your Last Kingdom books again.  Just brilliant and thank you.

I was very interested to read of your link with Uhtred via your family surname of Oughtred.  I think I can make a similar link with Hering son of King Hussa of Bernicia.  Surnames as we know them did not exist then, but personal names did.  Hussa ruled from 596 - 603 and then Aethelfrith of Northumbria took Bernicia and Hering was forced to flee to the Scots.  He sought help from  Aedan of Dalriata and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle tells us that "Hering  son of Hussa led a raiding army there"  Hering and Aedan fought and lost the Battle of Degsastan in 603 and "after that, no king of the Scots dared lead a raiding army into this nation".  So what happened to Hering?  There is a story here!

The personal name of Hering does occur in Icelandic sagas such as that of Grettir the Strong where he is a skilled rock climber and "Easterner".  The name is also found in place names such as Herringby in Norfolk where the earliest form is shown as  Haeringr-by.  It is also possibly the origin of Harringay in London.

I know Benfleet and Essex well and searched for your holed stone at Thundersley.  I only found a small stone shaped like a skull, but there is a large holed standing stone at nearby Hockley.  perhaps it has been moved there.

Best wishes,

Peter herring

PS another link - i was born just ten days before you in February 1944!

A

I doubt it! Who’d move such a stone?  It’s been half a (long) lifetime since I was last in Thundersley so maybe it’s a faulty memory?

 


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Hi,

Let me start by saying i have loved all your books and Uhtreds story is my faviroute so far.

I have just finished pagan lord and am halfway through "empty throne" and i am struck by a burning question.

What happens to Uhtred's cousin and mother that he captures in the failed attempt on his bebbanburg?

I have a habit of "skimming" books and I am afraid, i have missed it. Or has this not be revealed yet?

James Clarke

 

A

Keep reading!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell.

Can i look forward to reading about Uhtreds last adventure.  i have so enjoyed your story. thank you

Gerald Craigie

 

Are you gonna write another book about lord Uhtred after he and Finn took his home back I love everyone one of those ten books.

Sean Patrick Ostrom

A

I'm writing the next book now.


Q

Hello Mister Cornwell,

 

Firstly, I would like to say what a privilege and absolute joy it has been to discover your work. I first discovered you back in 2015 when the adaptation of The Last Kingdom aired. I wouldn't read the first book in the series until five or six months ago, and I regret not doing so earlier. I've not read proper in too long but now listen to audiobooks at work. In the last five months I have listened to the entire The Last Kingdom series and am currently a third of the way through Enemy of God. In my limited experience I consider Jonathan Keeble to have no equal in audiobook narration and am pleased whenever I hear him narrate one of your books.

 

Now as I have only read The Last Kingdom series and part of The Warlord Chronicles, I've only experience with your use of a singular first-person narrative. My first question is how do you decide on what perspective to write when you begin a story, and do you find it difficult to describe events the narrator wasn't a part of or perhaps find a way to include the narrator in a believable way? And does the same difficulty apply when characterizing the other characters in the story only using the narrator's knowledge of them?

 

I've also read that the only actor whose voice you picture in your head when writing a character is Sean Bean for Richard Sharpe. My last question is since The Last Kingdom programme aired, has it affected at all in subsequent books in the series? Do you now picture Alexander Dreymon when writing Uhtred? Thank you for your time.

 

Greetings from California,

 

Chris J.

A

It's a choice and I seem to have settled on first person narratives, though I’ve written plenty in the third person. The great problem of first person is you can’t change the point-of-view, which makes it hard to plot some sequences. You also find yourself writing things like ‘I later learned that . .‘ which I try to avoid, but is often unavoidable. Still, I find it more immediate to write in the first person so I suspect I’ll go on doing it unless, of course, I write that Sharpe book I keep promising.

 

I don’t, but that’s not disparaging of Alexander who I think is terrific! It’s because I’m so far ahead and Uhtred is getting old and Alexander is anything but old. But he’s a wonderful Uhtred!

 


Q

Will there be any more books in the Last Kingdom series? maybe Uhtred's  family can carry on. It would be great as I have really enjoyed reading all the books.

Andrew Saxby

A

I'm writing the next book of The Last Kingdom series now.


Q

Hello,

Having about finished Uhtred's adventures (I'm halfway through The Flame Bearer), I'd like to ask about your research into the different religions. I follow the old ways and am fascinated by how much knowledge you have of the Pagan and Christian belief systems, and admire the way your characters argue one against the other (in often hilarious exchanges!). My question is, has this knowledge been a natural accrual over the years, or did you purposely set out to research the religions/beliefs to such a depth? Were there particular parts that you enjoyed or found more interesting than others?

Cheryl Hawley

A

I think it’s been a natural accrual with some added research, though I try to keep Uhtred’s grasp of his religion fairly shaky. He’s a religious magpie, choosing the things that please him and rejecting the rest. At heart I think he’s only a pagan to annoy the Christians, a stance I thoroughly approve of!

 


Q

The premise of your new book sounds fascinating but I am really waiting to find out how Utred gets his land back.... When can we fanatics hope to see another Last Kingdom entry.

Thank you for your time and hours of great reading

George McClelland

 

Dear Mr Cornwell,

My husband and I have enjoyed reading all 10 books of your Last Kingdom series back to back and wonder if you plan another volume for Uhtred and his friends or was Flame Bearer the end?

Best regards

Catherine A.Dickinson (Nottingham)

 

Will there be any more books in this section? maybe Uhtred's  family can carry on. It would be great as I have really enjoyed reading all the books.

Andrew Saxby

 

A

I am writing the next book of The Last Kingdom series now!


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell.

Having recently discovered the delight that is The Last Kingdom series on Audible I have galloped my way through the first four in the story of Uhtred and his adventures.

 

I was absolutely devastated to find the perfectly chosen vocal chords of Jonathan Keeble had been replaced upon starting the fifth book and I am devastated to say it has completely ruined the experience for me. The new narrator lacks the character, performance and delivery of Keeble and it no longer feels like Uhtred is being brought to life.

 

Why such a drastic change in narrator, part way through the series also? And the change in how names of people and places, the lack of accents is deeply off putting after such an appropriate and colourful performance for the reading of the other novels.

 

I'm sure you have been asked this before but I'm so interested as I adore the story and the series, and I will be persevering although unfortunately it will take me longer now as I shall have to read the books myself with Mr Keeble''s portrayal of Uhtred in my head.

 

So yes, back to the point, why such a drastic change? Why did no one think for consistency about accents etc? And did the new narrator not  think at all about the character he was supposed to be reading as because it really does take away from the fantastic journey you are taking us on through the series.

 

Many thanks in advance for your response! And for the brilliant books!

Emily Bennett

A

I have no involvement in the audio books - or choice of narrator - but perhaps Mr. Keeble was not available?


Q

I know your time is valuable, so I will cut to the chase.  I am nearly through your Saxon series, and have purchased a hardcover copy of each of your Saxon titles to preserve for the future in my small library of useful books. Yet as I follow Uhtred's adventures, I cannot avoid a sharp bitter-sweetness welling up in me, more bitter than sweet.  My question is this:  Is there a future for European history in a world where the very notion of Europe as it has been known since history began is in danger of extinction.  When I refer to Europe, I am speaking of the white peoples who live there, without which there would be no Europe. I thank you for your time.

Armand William Presentati

A

I’d recommend that you read Daniel Defoe’s great poem ‘The True Born Englishman’. You’ll find it here:

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44081/the-true-born-englishman

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I first discovered your work, less than a year ago, when I stumbled across The Warlord Chronicles which was recommended on someone's blog. I wish I could remember who's blog so I can thank them but unfortunately it was the result of some random and now long forgotten night time surfing!

 

I immediately enjoyed reading the story as told by Derfel and found I could connect with the character with ease. Naturally I progressed to the Last Kingdom and I enjoyed the tales of Uhtred in a similar way. They do seem very much alike, Uhtred and Derfel and I really like the first person narrative too.

 

I live on Canvey Island or Caninga as it was known when it featured in The Pagan Lord and Sword Song. Along with our neighbours over the creek in Benfleet (Beamfloet) we are immensely proud of our local heritage and history. I actually walked around Canvey's sea wall, all 13.5 miles, while listening to one of those two books as an audio book.  Even though the landscape has changed beyond recognition, being able to see the very places as they were mentioned really brought the story to life, while taking my mind off of the aching in my feet.

 

Where did you begin your research into the battles which took place at Beamfloet?

 

Will Uhtred return to Caninga in the next book?

 

Thanking you in advance

 

Wayne

A

I suppose I began my research into Canvey when I was a child!  We lived in Thundersley, more or less on top of Bread and Cheese hill, and from the ridge there (Thundersley Glen) we could look out across Benfleet and Canvey. I have a distinct memory of the disastrous flood that struck Canvey Island . . . of course the whole area is full of Saxon/Danish remnants . . . the remains of the disastrous Danish defeat at Benfleet were discovered when they built the railway.  It all fascinated me!

 


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Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I Would know which is your favourite character( Sharpe, Uhtred, Starbuck,Thomas Hookton, Derfel) and who would you like to be.

Marc

A

I’m like a parent – I don’t have favourites!


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I think I remember you saying in a book that Uhtred was named after one of your ancestors; is that right? Isn't it so cool to have that genealogy? I found out a few years ago that my grandpa's bloodline connects him and us to English and German royalty! It's so exciting. Also I LOVE LOVE LOVE The Saxon Tales! Do you know how many more you'll write?

Barbara

 

Hi, the last Kingdom book series is my favorite of all time.  Will there be anymore them? I've read all 10. If so could you let me know when?

Thank you very much.

Keily Speed

A

I don't know how many more there will be.....but I am writing the next one now!


Q

I am in the process of reading the above book, can you advise me if this is the last of the series, from what I've read so far I hope not.

Pauline McGuinness

 

I'm just wondering if there will be an 11th book in the Last Kingdom series.  I've finished eight now and am starting Warriors of the Storm.  I hate to think that Uhtred of Bebbanburg will be riding off into the sunset.

Carl Spatazza

 

I was wondering when the next book is likely to be coming out as I feel Uhtred has a way to go thank you for taking the time to read this

Tim Cook

A

I have recently begun writing the next book of Uhtred's tale.....


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I was wondering if the series would ever "outlive" its original protagonist?  Uhtred is getting exceptionally old for this period in Britain.  You have mentioned several times that this series is about the unification of England into one nation and Uhtred is just a spectator to it.  If that is the case the series may become a bit stagnant if they are written from the perspective of so old an individual.  The first section of The Empty Throne was written from the perspective of Uhtred the Younger.  Was this foreshadowing a later, more permanent transition?  When I recently re-read the series I noticed that the series has finally progressed beyond the point where Uhtred began telling his story.  Now that he has regained Bebanburgh and a younger generation of Englishmen are ready to push towards unification, is he going to pass the torch on to his younger namesake?

Craig Edgar

A

I wish I knew . . . I do think about ‘passing the torch’, but a small inner voice (Uhtred’s) growls at me whenever I do. We’ll see!

 


Q

Is the "Flame Bearer" the final story about Uhtred?

John Blalock

 

I have just finished reading The Flame Bearer and thought it was the last in the series but have just heard there is going to be another one .Fantastic but what is the title and when is it out ? Have got all 10 in hardback and cant wait .Can you believe I am a great grandmother but I am hooke

yours sincerely

Christine Marsh

 

 

Mr. Cornwell

My wife pick up the last "Saxon Tales" FLAME BEARER and then read your other 9 books.

She keeps asking me when the next Saxon Tales book is coming out?

Happy wife happy life, help.

George

 

Hello

I am from Brazil, and a huge fan of Uhtred.

Easy question: are we going to have a 11th book?

Thanks!!!

Vitor Roma

 

A

There will be an 11th book - it will be the next book I write - hopefully ready for publication next year!


Q

Dear Sir,

 

I have read many of your books over the years and have always found them to be enjoyable - and informative, stimulating much further reading. Recently, I started the Last Kingdom series and, once again, I am thoroughly enjoying the experience. It reminds me very much of a film I once saw as a child, depicting the battles between Alfred and Guthrum; all very dramatic - and didactic, with a climactic baptism scene. Probably long forgotten now, but surely well-known 40 years ago. As a child of Dorchester, it's always lovely to read writers exploring the further reaches of Britain.

 

However, as I read the first of these novels on my kindle, I was stuck by something. The first person narrative reminded me of something. It took a while but I began to to think of the Flashman novels. There was an archness to the observations and an eye for detail that took me to GMF's finest creation. There was humour and irony among the usual action. The key difference is that Uhtred is heroic and decent, unlike the cowardly Flashman (although that changes through GMF's novels, in my opinion, generally speaking, until the last, in which he completes an awful deed).

 

I was surprised, therefore, when checking back to the list of place names (to keep track of where everyone is) when I noticed the dedication - to George MacDonald Fraser. What a delightful homage (you may know that, with the kindle, the reader is taken directly to the first page of the narrative, jumping past the earlier pages - so, one has to look for any additional content).

 

I don't know if you deliberately chose to write in this way, but I must say, it is marvellous. The style is a revelation. While your previous books have maintained a wonderful rhythm and are rich in themselves, this new, playful conceit was  wonderful.

 

I look forward to more but I am also sure you could continue Flashman's adventures, if you don't mind me saying so (your work stands alone) - we all know there are more that have yet to be revealed (should it be permitted).

 

Thank you for your work - it's been great fun since I picked up my first Sharpe novel and continues to give great enjoyment - but this is another development which I applaud heartily.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

Guy Redmill

A

That’s extraordinarily kind of you, and flattering!  I knew George well, and liked him a lot.  I certainly didn’t set out to imitate him, so any similarity is fortuitous and serendipitous! I hope you’ve read Quartered Safe Out Here, George’s memoir of his WWII experience? It’s quite brilliant.


Q

Hi Bernard

 

Your standard answer to every question you receive about writing more Starbuck novels is that you hope to return to the series one day.  Would you consider running a poll amongst contributors to this site to decide on your next book after the Uhtred book that is coming next?  I would love to think that your fans could influence your choice.

 

Peter

 

A

I suspect most people would vote for more Sharpe!  Or more Uhtred! I don’t know!  It would be interesting, but I’m a firm believer that a writer writes best what he or she wants to write! Maybe I’ll get back to poor Nathaniel one day?


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Dear Mr. Cornwell

LOVE your work!  I'm a widow, age 68, and enjoy going to battle with Uhtred.  I also love any reference to needlework in your books.  My request:  In the next Uhtred book, please tell us how the women acquired their stitching tools.  (Did Uhtred bring his wife a packet of needles, a thimble, a pair of scissors from Frankia?   Did the women stitch ornamental work other than banners, sails, and capes?)   Perhaps in your research you have discovered other bits of needlework history from that period.  If so, please share?

Thank you for your books.  I marvel at your genius!

Linda

 

A

I’ll do my best!  Can’t quite imagine Uhtred doing needlework, but you never know!!!!


Q

I have just visited HEXHAM ABBEY in Northumberland and on the list of PROVOSTS of the old Abbey is one UHTRED. He was Provost from 1056 to 1072. He was responsible for looking after the safety of the Abbey, which at the time was going through one of the usual religious to and froing between the Bishop of Durham and Archbishop of York.

I wonder if he was any relation of the mighty one from the LAST KINGDOM,?????

Brian Raine

A

I’m fairly sure he was . . . I do have the family tree, but can’t lay my hands on it right now.  They’d lost Bebbanburg by then and most of the family had moved to North Yorkshire (where some still live), but it’s most likely he was related.

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I'm not sure you'll be able to answer this yet, although maybe you do know the answer already. I've just finished reading The Flame Bearer and I am wondering approximately how long it will be before the 11th book in the Last Kingdom series is released?

Kind regards,

Matt Draper

 

I recently started reading the last kingdom series and read the first 3 books in a week. I just ordered the next 4. I was wondering how many books you're planning to write in this series. I want to make sure i read the whole series before i start watching the show.

Lenny Chieffo

 

When will the next Uhtred book appear, can't wait much longer

Barry Lazenbury

 

Hello,

Love the story of Uhtred, read every book just finished The Flame Bearer, I'm not enjoying great health and would like to know Uhtred's fate before I face my own. When will the next book be available, I'm having withdrawal symptoms. You are a gifted story teller Sir!

Will.

 

Good evening Bernard.

I was looking forward to October when I expected the 11th book in the Last Kingdom series.Sadly there won't be one this year.Will it be out next year?

Hope so.

Best wishes,and thank you for your wonderful books.I have a bookcase full of everything you have written so far.Many visitors comment on the fact that you are the only Author on there.My reply is,that you are the only Author worth keeping,and many of them are first editions.

Sue

 

A

It will be the next book I write so, with any luck, it should be published next year.  Still not sure how many books will be in this series....


Q

After reading Death of Kings which features battle of Tettenhall I was most surprised in the following title to see Wodensfield described as Wednesbury.  Surely Wednesfield would have been accurate?  Local school near here, Wednesfield High, recently had reenactment if the Battle of Tettenhall - there is debate locally as to where battle took place - Tettenhall, Wednesfield or somewhere else.  Minor grjpe from me, but please continue your excellent series about Uhtred.

 

Mike Gough

A

My source for all those names is usually the Cambridge Dictionary of English place-names, but what you say does sound very plausible, thank you.

 

 

 


Q

Hi Bernard

I have just finished Flame Bearer I have absolutely loved the whole series. Is there a book to follow this one?

Thanks

Simon Hewson

 

I am waiting for the Flame Bearer to arrive. I'm hoping this is not the last Uhtred novel. What are your plans on another?

I've read and enjoyed all you books and am also planning on reading the Arthur books Thank you for many hours of entertainment

Ellis

 

Hi Bernard

I am such a big fan of your work even though i just learned about The saxon stories in january last year, i was all ready done reading Warriors of The Storm last september waiting for The Flame Bearer in october as i read it right away.

I was wondering if there will be an eleventh book in the series and if so if it too was to be released now in october? If not, how long then are we going to have to wait?

Perhaps you could too tell me if it is the plan for the tv-show to continue for the whole story with seasons for every two books as they did with the first one?

Hope to hear back,

Alexander Strandmark

 

Please, Mr. Cornwell,

when will the 11th book in the "Last Kingdom Series" be available?  Thank you.

Michael MacIver

 

Dear Mr Cornwell

Now that Lord Uthred has returned home, will there be anymore adventures for him?

I sincerely hope so.

Kind regards

Kim Allison

 

 

A

There will be another book in The Last Kingdom series.  It will be the next book I write, so - hopefully - it will be ready for publication in 2018.  Not sure about the TV programmes yet, but we'll post that information once we learn it!


Q

Hello!

I, too, am a big fan of Uhtred and your Saxon Tales/The Last Kingdom series, and I also enjoyed Azincourt. Your next book, Fools and Mortals sounds really interesting. I'm looking forward to the release date.

 

You have written about nearly every period of British History, except the Norman invasion (unless I'm missing something?). Have you considered writing about that time period?

 

This is not meant to be a book idea (I read your note above). I'm just curious about what other historical periods you have considered for the setting of your books. I, for one, would be all over a book about the Norman conquest of the 11th century. :-D

 

But then again, I'd be all over anything you write.

 

Happy writing!

A

I don't have plans to write about the Norman invasion.


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Q

Hello.

I just finished reading The Flame Bearer, and knowing that it was the last book in the series, I am already missing Uhtred.  However, I did see your response to another question which stated that there will indeed be more Uhtred.  Thank you!

 

I also watched the BBC series The Last Kingdom seasons 1 & 2, and am hoping they will continue the series.  Are you aware if this is a possibility?  Any information on the series will be appreciated.  I thought the show and casting of characters were excellent, especially the actor portraying Uhtred.

 

Eagerly looking forward to more Uhtred,

~Susie

A

We hope so too!  We'll let you know as soon as we know!


Q

Hello.  Will there be an 11th book of Saxon Tales?

Suzanne

 

When will the next book in the last kingdom series be released?

Anand

 

Sorry couldn't access your question page. Does Uhtred return now he has got Bebbanburg back?

Donald Farmer

 

I am just about to read the flame bearer and was wondering if there are going to be any more books in this series.I have really enjoyed reading them.

Glynnis Finch

 

Hi, having just finished this series & noticing you describing the latest book as the 10th, does this mean there is another to come,

regards

Colin.

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story!  I will start the 11th book of the series once the theatre season is over!


Q

Hello, Mr. Cornwell.

I've just begun the "Last Kingdom" series and see a resemblance in the love-hate dynamic that exists between Uhtred and Alfred to that of Sharpe and Wellington. Is this a coincidence or a theme you consciously explore? There is a certain vicarious pleasure in simultaneously tweaking and earning the respect of a celebrated historic figure.

Chris Nelson

A

I suspect I explore it unconsciously! It certainly helps to have some tension between the main historical character (Alfred, Wellington) and the fictional one! Otherwise the book is likely to be hagiography.

 


Q

Hey Mr. Cornwell.

I won't go into details about how much I love your work.

 

I just finished reading the Flame Bearer, and I've been wondering about one thing. When Uhtred asks Hanna if she would like to marry his son, she responds "No, lord, he looks like you."

 

I laughed out loud when I read this sentence. Was this a reference to the TV series? I love it but you know how it is with TV/film adaptations. I always imagined Uhtred to be less pleasant looking than the actor and when I read this part, I thought to myself "we're on the same boat with Cornwell on this one".

 

And I'm not a native speaker, please forgive my French.

 

Have a nice day!

Ismail Akman

A

Oh lord no!  The story behind that is that a young girl (called Hannah) wrote to me asking for me to be nasty to her younger brother!  So that’s it!  She’s just rude to Uhtred because she’s Hannah!  And I think Alexander Dreymon is terrific!


Q

Hello,

Congratulations on your success with Uhtred (both in novels and on TV).

I sure you get this question all the time but can't find a recent answer. Will Sharpe and Harper ever go again? its been a decade since the last Sharpe release.

Steven

 

Hi Bernard,

 

I have always been a fan of Sharpe since they came out on TV, So with my new audiobook app I decided to listen to the books, it took me 30 days to listen to them all (except the short stories- which I may have to actually read). Following Devil, I felt rather dejected, observing a vacuum...so whilst surfing the net I discovered that Patrick (son) appears in the starbuck chronicles, so decided this morning to 'pick up' Rebel....finished it this evening. And will start on Copperhead tonight. With regards Sharpe....I feel Antonia ...Sharpe's daughter is a novel which is crying out to be written or perhaps it is just my feeling the loss of Sharpe....will you write more Sharpe? I, having read rebel today am also curious as to when the TV adaptation will be out...saw the teaser...but info was limited regarding release!! Keep up the good work.

Best Regards.

Danny...Soldier

 

A

Another Sharpe book is a possibility....


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Q

I would like to begin by stating my husband and I are big fans.  We just finished binge reading books 5 through 10.  We loved them!  I love the story line, the characters, and how the story line continues from one book to the next one.

 

I recently finished book 10 and noticed something that bothered me.  There appears to be a conflict between two of the books:

 

“The Empty Throne” (book 8) pages 86-87 state:  “Ingulfrid was married to a cousin of mine, another Uhtred, the son of my uncle who had usurped Bebbanburg.  She had chosen to stay with us when I failed to capture that fortress.  Her son had been with her, but Osferth had sent the boy back to his father.  I would have cut the little bastard’s throat, but I had given the gift of his life to Osferth and he had been generous.”

 

“The Flame Bearer”  (book 10) pages 40-41 state:  “We had captured my cousin’s son, a mere boy, and I had let Osferth, one of my trusted men, look after both him and his mother, who had been taken captive with her son.  Mother and son had both died of a plague the year before, but inevitably men said that I had poisoned them,.  He died of the sweating fever, I said, and so did thousands of other in Wessex.”

 

I hope Uhtred's story continues (soon) and I look forward to reading the next book in the Saxon series.  If you ever need another editor, I volunteer!

 

A fan,

Donna Bennett

Union Grove, Alabama

A

I really don’t remember and, forgive me, I’m not going to check. If it’s a mistake, mea culpa!


Q

Hi again, Mr. Cornwell.

You say that the device on Uhtred's banner and shield is a grey wolf's head.  But as far as I can find, you no where specify what is the color of the field it is on.  What color is it?

Alan Kempner

A

I think you’re right – I don’t think I ever do say! I’d like to think the field was black, but that was a difficult colour to dye and maintain. Darker grey? White? I’ll settle for blood-red!

 


Q

I have just finished book 10. Thank you so much BUT it cant end there, there has to be more. Uhtred is finally home, Athelstan becomes king, so much more. If it is continued in another series. what is it!!!

Diane Cupp

 

Hi

Love all your last kingdom books

When is the next book out in the series?

Regards

Martyn

 

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

I just finished the Saxon stories (all ten of them), I wanted to thank you for writing such enjoyable books and I learned a lot about English history that I did not know. I was wondering if there is any chance of the series continuing. Perhaps with Uhtred (his son) and continue Edwards and then Athelstan or perhaps skipping forward to Cnut the Great or William the Conqueror with a descendant  of Uhtred. I don't know just some ideas but I hope to see more titles like this in the future and more Uhtred(s)

Richard Barela

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story - probably the next book I'll write!


Q

I really love the Saxon Tales.  Uhtred has become like an old friend.  I have read the whole series, and can't wait for the next installment.  Please tell me that there's another in the works.  Also, if there is another coming, please let Jonathan Keeble narrate it.  To me he really nails down Uhtred's character, and does all of the other characters very well.  I have vision problems so I pretty much listen to audio versions of books these days.

 

Sandra McLemore

Pensacola, Florida, USA

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story!  I don't have a say in the choice of narrator for the audio books - but I'll pass along your request!


Q

Hello my name's David and I'm just writing to thank you for all the wonderful books you've written. I've been reading your books for over a decade now and Sharpe, Uhtred and Derfel are to this day my favorite literary characters and they've all helped me get through some pretty tough times. I just finished re reading Sharpe eagle for the third time and I realized I've never tried to reach out to the man who birthed characters that almost feel like family at this point. My grandmother and I had our own Cornwell book club painting a close relationship despite the distance by reading your books together and discussing our favorite parts and qualities every step of the way. Once again thank you, I hope writing these novels gave as you as much joy tenfold as they did to read.

 

P.s.

If you were to visit one battleground from Wellingtons campaign in the Peninsular where would you go? Also.... Do you think Arthur was really a part of our history or just a myth turned conspiracy theory?

 

With gratitude

David

A

 

Well, I’ve visited them all. If I could only go to one? Probably Salamanca!

 

I think he was real, but nothing like the myth. I suspect he was the British leader who won the Battle of Mount Badon, that he was a pagan (the early church in Britain detested him) and a great warlord. What he achieved, I think, was to delay the Saxon invasion of Britain for a generation and that gave rise to a myth of the golden age . . . and that myth is behind his present (and enduring) fame.


Q

I was wondering where you got your evidence that the river Tame flowed through Wednesfield and further west, through Tettenhall? I live just North, in Cannock. Obviously a lot was lost when the canals came to the Midlands. Do you have any particular references to hand, as my search has proved fruitless.

 

We (my 8-year old son and budding localist like myself) were dighted at the mention of Penkridge in "Pagan Lord" abd he pored over the pafes at the front if the novel that contained the Anglo Saxon place names and translations. We were hf expecting the Staffordshire Hoard to turn up at one point, so close Uhtred was to its place of discovery.  Rory, my son, was part outraged, part impressed at Uhtred's insults to the Dabes (though is too well mannered to use them himself) .

Many thanks for this book; I've just borrowed "The Empty Throne" from the library.

Lucy Lugg

A

Oh lord, I did find evidence! But for the life of me I can’t remember where. I have this horrible habit of not noting my sources because, being a novelist, I don’t need them for footnotes and noting them takes forever, and at my age forever is not very long. I apologise. And my best (polite) wishes to Rory!


Q

I have really enjoyed all your books, and look forward to the next adventure(s) of Uhtred. Also, do you intend to expand on the adventures of the Lazender clan? Enjoyed those also.

I am currently reading "The Picts: a history" by Tim Clarkson. Covers the years about 500 to 900 in at the area of Scotland. This sounds like something you would might enjoy. "More sayeth the deponent nought."

Many wishes for a long and illustrious career.

Clyde Stauffer

A

No more plans for the Lazender clan.  Thanks for the recommendation!


Q

Firstly a huge thank you for your time, effort, research and for choosing to write for a living.

 

Thank you for the many hours of adventures through different centuries.

 

Read/listened to almost all of your books.

 

Question:

Interested to see what you will write about next. Assuming more on Uhtred? (I hope as I've grown attached to the characters)

 

Also any possible plans in future to cover either Roman or Greek periods? (Very broad timeframes i know)

 

Thank you again, keep it up! You're awesome.

Victor Manusov

A

I don't have plans for the Romans or the Greeks - but there will be more Uhtred!


Q

Hi is there another Uhtred book coming? I miss him :)

Catherine Heaps

 

Will there be more books in the Saxon Tales? I just finished book 10.  I have absolutely devoured them and now plan to reread them more slowly.  As I read them , I stop and look up history about different subjects you have in your novels.

When my husband finished Agincourt, he ordered a book on the English Longbow to get a better understanding.  thanks so much.

Becky Peebles

 

I've enjoyed reading all of these books and am anxiously waiting for the next one. Will it be out soon?  The TV series is good and I watch every show, but I much prefer to read the books. Your writing makes the characters and the story real to me..  Thank you.

Patricia Clayton

 

Is there a date to release the 11th book of The Last Kingdom Series? Thank you for your response.

Rodrigo

A

There will be more to Uhtred's tale - probably the next book I write!


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell.

I am enjoying so much The Saxon Stories. So far, it is the best novel series I've read. For that, I would like to thank you for the great work you have been doing, and praise you for such a fascinating story.

I just wanted to mention one thing I found divergent on the story. At Lords of the North, we have seen that Ragnar took Kjartan's life. However, at The Empty Throne, chapter 6, Uhtred claims his death for himself ("I have loved Ragnar. He had been my true father, the Dane who have taught me to be a man, and he had died in those flames, and I always hoped he had seized his sword before he was killed so that he was in Valhalla to see when I took revenge for him by slaughtering Kjartan on a northern hilltop."

It is a minor item, but took my attention.

Best regards,

Ricardo Cordeiro

A

Oh, that looks like an error. I’m so sorry you spotted it!


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Q

I'm from germany and love all your books. Especially the Uhtred Saga. I have recognized you've stopped to tell the story as old Uhtred, telling his story to the young princess, trying to get pregnant? why? :)

Michael Conzelmann

A

The stories are still being told by the same Uhtred!


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Q

Mr. Cornwell,

 

I'm reading my way through the Saxon Chronicles books (and immensely enjoying them), but something struck me as odd in certain descriptions of shields. Uhtred is described a few times as strapping a shield to his arm, but as far as I am aware, Viking Era shields were held by a handle on the back of the boss, not strapped to the forearm. I don't mean to nitpick. I am just curious if you perhaps know of any artifacts or accounts of strapped shields being in use by Vikings or the inhabitants of Britain in the era.

 

Thanks

 

Ethan

A

I agree they’re not ‘strapped’, but there are two loops, or straps, or whatever . . . those things were heavy! Especially if they had an iron rim. I don’t think there’s a universal pattern, I’m quite prepared to believe that some shields were equipped with a single handle, but the weight of the shield would put an immense strain on the hand and wrist. I’ll stick with the two!

 


Q

Hello sir!  Congratulations on the success of The Last Kingdom TV show.  Alex does a terrific job portraying Uhtred, to the point that I hear his voice when reading Uhtred's tale.  I am rereading the series again...for the 3rd time to my son, Robert Jr., though he goes by Bobby not Robb.  He is the inspiration for this question:  You have indicated that Uhtred is not retiring even though he has finally captured his home.  Once he does retire, have you considered carrying on the story with Uhtred Jr.?  R.W. Peake, author of the Marching With Caesar series, did so with first the son, then the grandson, of Titus Pullus, his original protagonist, quite splendidly.  I have read every fiction book you have written and greatly enjoy the Saxon Tales specifically.  It would be quite satisfying to read the culmination of Alfred's dream when Britain is united by his grandson and, I suspect, Uhtred Jr. would have a significant hand in assisting with this triumph.  I also suspect I am not the only fan who would enjoy reading the exploits of Uhtred Jr.  Finally, thank you for providing so many hours of entertainment through the years.  I look forward to Saxon Tales book 11.

Robb Miller

A

I won't know where the story will go next until I write it.....


Q

Love this series but when is the next book due??  You can't leave Uhtred finally at  Bebbanburg with only a tear in his eye - please don't do this to us!!

 

For that reader who is worried about the swords, Uhtred's seax is Wasp Sting and Finan's sword is Soul Stealer...

 

Thank you for such a great series of books.

Judith

A

Thank you!

And - hopefully - you'll see the next book of Uhtred's story in 2018.


Q

I am from Australia and love the history of the UK. I was never much for reading growing up in fact only due to living in Germany in 2001 at the age of 37 I found one of your Sharpe's books in a local library. From that day I have read many of your books. 1356 is my favourite. Thank you for helping me find the joy in reading though the way you tell a story. When's the next instalment of Uhtred due for release?

regards

Neville

 

I have read all of these amazing books now and am left feeling that the series is yet to continue-I sincerely hope so. I read the authors note at the end of each book and at the end of Warriors of the storm the note says "He has further to go, so he will march again".Please tell me that you are currently writing another book about Uhtred and when I may be lucky enough to have a copy to read.

Congratulations on an epic and compelling work, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Kindest Regards,

Karen.

A

I am not writing it now - too busy learning lines for the summer theatre season; but it's likely to be the next book I write!


Q

Loving your Uhtred books!!!! As a Latin Americanist, I have a question about corn, mentioned in the first book. How is it possible that the Saxons were growing corn in the 9th century (a plant native to the Americas). Or is this a different thing than the maize first developed by the Maya? Thank you!

Robin Kirk

A

The English word 'corn' (remember?  you read it in the bible?  Jesus wasn't eating maize...that's a clue!) means grain - any grain; wheat, barley, rye - they're all 'corn'.  The English call corn 'maize'.  It is confusing, but don't blame the English - it IS their word, and it's a very old word, and it has a very plain meaning in their language.  It's the US that has restricted the meaning to one crop.

 

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

just finished "Waterloo" , the last book of you I hadn't swallowed so far.

After finishing it, there is a desperate desire, to read about more major battles from you.

Is there anything which could drive you, to get back to Starbuck and let him march to Gettysburg?

Best regards,

Michael

 

Hi Mr. Cornwall,

I just finished reading The Bloody Ground.  Great read.  Enjoyed all of the Starbuck Chronicles. I visited the Antietam Battlefield as well as Harpers Ferry a couple of years ago. I only whisk I had read The Bloody Ground before the visit.  It would have greatly enhanced the visit.

Are there any plans to Continue the Starbuck Chronicles?  The historical note hinted at the possibility. Starbuck will march again.

Again, thank you for a great read.

Regards,

Bob McHugh

 

Hi Bernard,

I am an avid fan of your books; in fact I have read everyone of them at least twice...😊.

I am also a history order buff and have a wide collection of historical novels and fact based books.

One particular genre I have had an interest in for over 25 years now is the USA Civil War and your Starbuck Chronicles brings to life this epic period. I have waited and waited to learn of what happens to Nate for ages now and I can wait no longer. So have your any plans to return to Nate to follow Nash his story!

Many thanks, Paul

Btw:.the BBC did you proud with their Last Kingdom series.....I have to say I had a tear in my eye as I followed Uhtred's struggle with Alfred and the Danes....'twas brilliant.

 

A

I've always hoped I'd get back to Starbuck one day....but I honestly don't know if that will happen.


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Q

Mr. Cornwell,

Does Finan's sword have a name? Does Uhtred Utredsson seax have a name?  I really like the names your given to the swords in Saxon Tales and I was just curious if you had thought of any others?

Thanks,

Jeff Cunico

 

A

God, I can’t remember! I believe they both have names, but I’d need to spend an inordinate amount of time to find them. Sorry. Perhaps an attentive reader can help?

 


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I have written here a while ago and first I want to say that your assistant(s) have been very nice, sending me the link to the recommended books for research and even replying to me when the link did not work.

 

That said, I just wanted to say that I have enjoyed all your books I've read till now, especially the tale of Uhtred (and I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Alfred). I liked that you gave a prominent role to Aethelflaed. I have to admit that I stalled a bit while reading the series because I did not want it to end.

I am glad to hear that Uhtred's tale is not finished yet. Will there be more of Aethelstan in the following books?

 

Anyway, thanks for reminding me that I want to know more about the period and your books have led me to research more about Wessex, Alfred, and his descendants.

 

Best,

Kaja

A

There will be, a lot!


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Q

Dear Bernard

 

You may be pleased to hear that The Last Kingdom series on the telly has inspired me to read the series on which it is based... I am now ahead of the series and delighted to be following Uhtred's further adventures - he is a brilliant character (and it helps that he is played by such a lovely actor!) I have never read a series of books in my life so I am thoroughly impressed.

 

I do notice a lot of enjoyable references to birds in the books. As I am married to a birdwatcher, I did wonder whether it was a hobby of yours - some of the finer details suggested that it might be. I would love to know!

 

I look forward to the next instalment of Uhtred, and I am sure that I will be reading more of your work!

 

Rosa

A

Not really!  I do like to watch the ospreys hunting in Stage Harbor, but other than that?


Q

Will you ever have Jonathan Keeble do the narration for the last 6 books for the last kingdom series? The other narrators are pathetic and a huge disappointment - they sounds like prissy saps who cant pull of Uhtred!

Thank you !

Dean K Kinred

A

The narrators are selected by the publishers of the audio books - I'm afraid I have no input!

 

 

 


Q

Have we heard the last of Uhtred or will there be a sequel to Flame bearer?

Pam Jones

 

I can't seem to find out if there will be a 3rd series. Can you put me out of my misery as I've enjoyed the show almost as much as the books? Also when is the follow up to "Flame Bearer" due? Good luck in all you do

Derek Williamson

 

I´m from Germany and i read your books now since 6 years.  I only want to know, if there will be more books about Uhtred of Bebbanburg.  I finished Book 10 and i´m happy to read that he arrived home. But will there be a book 11?  I hope so.

Sandra

 

Sir, In college I majored in History, then with luck was stationed in Wales for 3 years (RAF Caerwent), so the Saxon Tails has really brought back a lot of great memories and has just helped me visualize the books.  So thank you for your your great skill in writing.

Do you think you have an idea if you're going to do a book eleven and if so when?

Thank you,

Robert

 

Please tell me they are going to do a season 3 of The Last Kingdom.  I'm hooked!

BJ BURBRIDGE

 

Has the last kingdom series finished or can we expect more tales of uthred?

John

 

Mr.Cornwell,

I started reading The Last Kingdom in Early April, have read them all in order and have now started The Flame Bearer. Is this the last in the series, or will there be more? I don't want this story to end.

Thanks

Mark Luby

 

 

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story.  It is likely to be the book I'll write after the summer theatre season is over.  And - fingers crossed - I think there will be a third season of the tv show!


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwall,

 

As always, thank you for your continued work on the Last Warlord in the Kingdom sequence. I'm sure I'm not alone in thinking of Uhtred as an old and slightly unreliable friend I catch up with on a semi-regular basis because he's always good for a mug of ale and an outlandish story.

 

You've always been very open about the "semi-historical" nature of the books, but I have begun to wonder about the scale of Uhtred's personal achievements in battle.

 

Now, obviously he is the protagonist of a series of novels and thus gets to be a bit of a superhero, so we allow his skills and luck to extend a little into the realm of hyperbole...

 

...but in the real world, were there 9th, 10th century warlords who would have fought in dozens of shield-wall battles, and personally killed many champions, and butchered scores - if not hundreds - of other men besides? I am personally not anal enough to calculate Uhtred's "headcount" but it is the kind of thing someone on the internet will probably do, eventually... it's high though, we can agree, surely?

 

But is it outlandishly high? Impossibly high? Or merely improbably high?

 

In short: were there really men in that time, who had personally killed hundreds of people?

Anthony

A

Hundreds? The Chroniclers claim as much, though you’d need more than a pinch of salt to take them at their word! Yes, Uhtred is doomed to be heroic, poor man.

 


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

Firstly I would like to thank you for setting your books in the correct historical period, I was heartily sick of reading (and seeing) King Arthur in plate armour and stone castles for a start. It drives us history buffs mad. Secondly I would like to ask why in the warlord books you didn't point out that Pendragon was a title rather than a name, after all arthurs' name was arthur ap uther. My other question is probably one you cannot answer: why on earth didn't the makers of the last kingdom stick with Uhtred's normal " Fate is inexorable" rather than "Destiny is all" ? This may seem a bit pedantic but it annoys me so much. As another "ancient person" and avid readerof your books plus a historian it annoys me enormously, I can only assume that it was "dumbed down" for some reason or other, please don't put yourself down as an "ancient Person" your mind is quite obviously as sharp as a tack, and if your body won't co-operate with it find a way round it. I do, My mind thinks it's still 20, it's just my body that won't co-perate with it at 71 years of age. It is so wonderful to find an author who can write so well that the text comes alive ( a rarity in these days) that I can't afford not to have your books, they keep me going and give me more pleasure than most other authors.

yours Faithfully

B V Brook

A

I honestly don’t even remember using Pendragon so I assume it was my ignorance. I imagine the makers of the TV series thought, justifiably, that ‘inexorable’ was a bit obscure!


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Q

When was Uhtred born? 856 or 857?

 

Greetings from Brazil!

 

Vagner Stefanello

A

Good lord, I can’t remember, and all my notes were lost in a computer crash. I’m sure there’s a clue in the first book!

 


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Q

Mr.  Cornwell,

Is there now, or has there been any discussion of a special fine-page, fine-print edition of all 10 Saxon tales in a single volume (think Lord of the rings 50th anniversary edition)?  I revisit each Saxon novel prior to any new release.  That's ten times I've seen Uhtred expelled from Bebbanburg and several times repelled.  I'm hoping to commemorate his final return home in book ten with an Opus edition.  What are the chances of something like that being published?

 

Saving a spot on the shelf,

D.j. Amis

Atlanta, Georgia

A

I honestly have no idea! Let me finish his stories first and perhaps it’s a project for then!

 


Q

Dear Bernard,

I love almost all of your books but have struggled to get into the Starbucks series.However as much I particularly love Uhtred's story I think it's time for you to return to Starbuck to satisfy the rest of your fans. I don't know how many more books are left to be told, but maybe you could alternate between Starbuck and Uhtred? Will Richard Shakespeare be a one-off or the beginning of a new series?

Many Thanks,

Martin

 

A

I suspect it’s a one-off! I’ve enjoyed writing it, and I like the result (I would, wouldn’t I?) but can’t quite see where I might go next with Richard. But who knows? Not me!


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Hi, Mr. Cornwell,

 

I cried a lot while reading the Warlord Chronicles, but didn't cried with the Saxon Tales yet (I'm still on book 5 and loving it!). I think that's the reason I love Derfel's story so much, even more than Uhtred's, it's because it caught me by emotion. Your story made me feel very emotionally involved, in a way that I had this feeling that I was really experiencing the whole thing, and every tragedy that happened with the characters was like a knife in my own heart.

Speaking of that, is there any book that made you cry? And a movie?

 

Sorry about my english, greetings from Brazil.

Eilton Ribeiro

A

Thank you for that – the Warlord Chronicles were much deeper emotionally, I agree.  The last book that provoked tears in me was a poem by Geoffrey Hill, and I’ve lost the book now!

 


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Dear Mr Cornwell

 

I would just like to start off by saying that I am a huge fan and that you are my favourite writer, my question is in regards to the research done for "The Saxon Chronicles", especially the research done on the Norse beliefs, for example, the use of sacrifice, the stories about the gods and also the methods of sacrifice used by the pagans, my question is, was the research on the Norse hard to find and is some of it created by your imagination? I would also like to ask in the books when Uhtred is fighting he experiences what you called Battle Joy and I think Battle rage, I would just like to ask if these are real? and one final question, through your research have you found any evidence that the Norse used a type of Mushroom or herb before going into battle to make them go into a berserker rage?

 

Thank you for writing such incredible books.

Euan Clark

A

Mushrooms? No!  Ale, yes!  It’s quite possible they had hallucinatory drugs, I have no idea!  I did come across a tale that Finnish warriors fed magic mushrooms to their reindeer and then drank the reindeer’s urine. Try it! I do make quite a lot up – I’m a fiction writer!


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Hello there, Mr. Bernard,

As a guy who loves to draw bad-ass dudes with swords and other such weapons, your books have given me tons of inspiration! I would love to draw Uhtred, and other characters, to illustrate some of the awesome scenes that you write. So my question is, would you ever publish fan art on your site?  Also, have you ever thought about having illustrations in any of your books? Thanks for the great reads!

Clayton Hinkle

 

A

I don’t think we’ll ever have illustrations in the books, but who knows? As for fan art? We’ll think about it!

 


Q

Now that Uhtred is growing old and soon his stories will have to end, sadly, there will be more topics you can write about. Have you considered Charlemagne because there isn't much about him. How about Charles Martel? There is little of him also. Thanks for all the great stories, especially Uhtred!

Tom

A

I haven’t considered him, and probably won’t. I’m too ancient and have too many other books I want to write before the grim reaper gets me.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

May I add to the many thanks for providing many hours of escapist joy across many centuries. I am a fan of the Saxon Stories in particular - it's a fascinating period.

My question is: roughly how long do you spend researching compared to writing? Do you prepare up front then write, or research as you go along?

Looking forward to more Uhtred soon.

Ben Tidman

 

A

I'm continually researching - if not for the book I'm currently writing, then for the one I'll write next, or that I'll write a year or two from now.  I've been reading history since I was a child and all that reading contributes to what I do.  However - when thinking about a new book I'll spend some months (or more!) reading in a very concentrated way, though how long and how much depends on the book.  I have a very broad idea of where I might want a book to go, then just let the characters sort it out smongst themselves!

 

 

 


Q

I have thoroughly enjoyed your books over the years but my favorite fictional books of all time are the Warlord Chronicles. I have listened to them as audiobooks so many times over and I still enjoy listening to the tales of Derfel, Arthur, Galahad and the many more brothers in arms that occupy those pages. I have recommended this series many times to my own family and others.

I wonder if there have ever been thoughts to take this series to the screen? I truly believe that they would be wildly successful in the realms of Braveheart and Lord of the Rings. I could see a successful trilogy of movies here that many of us would absolutely support.

I have many times wished that I could put my ideas to paper like you and other authors do but until the time that I actually put myself out there and try (if ever) I intend to enjoy the books of my favorite authors like yourself. Take care and I wish you well.

Lee

 

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

Is there any chance one day that your Arthur trilogy could be put to film like The Last Kingdom series? I love the books on Uhtred and the TV series but your novels on Derfel and Arthur are the absolute best I have ever read!

Best Regards,

Rick Brimble

A

I guess there's always a chance....


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Hope you are in rude health. I see one fan wants you to live until 90 - I would prefer 100 - by my reckoning that's at least another 10 books !

Just a quick question, and one you may not as yet know the answer to - Is there any indication that a third series will be made to continue Uhtred's tale on the small screen? Enjoying it immensely and even more fun when Mum visits and I spoil the scenes by telling her what will happen (she hasn't read the books). I did refuse to tell her though whether Uhtred betrays Alfred

Andy Green

A

We’ll know soon . . . . . .


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

first of all let me tell you that I am fun of your work. I have not read all your books, only the last kingdom series, but hopefully, if me busy schedule allows me, I will read the others. If I am to be objective, maybe 5-6 books of the series felt to me, that the similar plots are happening just in the different places and times, but overall I think that the series are well written.

That being said I need to apologise, because I am going to ask you the question, which I think most of the writers does not like to hear. Now when the 2.season of the last kingdom is out, I feel hungry for another stories of Uhtred and Finan. When do you think we can expect the 11. book from the series ?

Thank you.

Best regards.

Pavol

 

I really enjoy your books. When can we expect the next book. My son and I are your unconditional fans.

J. A. Copa

 

Hi, I wanted to know how many books you intended to write in the Last Kingdom series?

Anne Maree

 

Hi Bernard,

I bought your latest book in 'The Last Kingdom' series - 'The Flame Bearer' and decided to reread the series from book 3 before I read 'The Flame Bearer', also in preparation for series 2 now showing on TV.

Bad mistake!  The TV series screen play really mucks about with the characters and time lines and several of your really dramatic scenes are either missed out or dumed down so miss the impact you originally intended to convey!

I really enjoyed 'The Flame Bearer' another first class read.  Can we expect another book in 2017?  I look forward to its release.

Many thanks from an avid reader - I have read all your work and enjoyed every book.

Les Stevens

A

Most likely the next book of Uhtred's tale will be written next year.  Not sure how many more there might be....


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Good Evening Mr. Cornwell,

 

I love your books. I started with the Saxon Stories and then have moved on to the Arthur Trilogy and Stonehenge. I've loved them all. Thank you very much for your stories. I also have to say I love Jonathan Keeble's narration of your audible books he really brings the characters to life.

 

Anyway onto my question. I was trying to explain to my wife that there are at least 7 but possibly 8 different people named Uhtred in the Saxon Stories but then I wasn't sure if I got the count right. Do you remember the number?

 

I love your stories and look forward to your future works.

 

Chuck

A

Five that I know of! Dad, eldest son Uhtred, our Uhtred, his eldest son, his younger son.

 


Q

I have been a reader of this series since the beginning (and its spiritual ancestor, the Warlord Chronicles) and have loved them all. But I have to say I've been rather disappointed by the TV series. It lacks the pacing and humour of the books. This is partly the loss of the internal monologue, which makes Uhtred seem like a rather tedious man, almost as "priggish" in his own way as Alfred is in the books. I can't think of any other way to describe it: each time someone (usually Alfred) offends Uhtred's dignity, he pouts and sulks. The great battles seem to have disappeared, with very little "shield wall". And the other problem is that everything has been compressed to the point that it is purely episodic. As I write this, I have just watched the programme where the Saxons attack Lundene. Admittedly I read this a long time ago, but gone is Uhtred's plan and catching the Danes between a rock and a hard place, instead we have just a Danish trap and the capture of Aethelflaed, didn't that come later?

 

I read that the BBC were looking for a Game of Thrones challenger, but I think they've tried to do it on the cheap and have lost the epic sweep. I know the TV company changed lots of things in Sharpe, but it didn't seem to affect the series so badly, perhaps this was because I came to the novels later or because Sean Bean was a better actor. I have never rated him, maybe I owe him an apology.

 

I imagine it is too soon for you to make any public comment on the adaptation, though I would be interested to hear what you think, but I have read so many favourable reports from the critics that I thought I should offer a counter.

 

And, please, whatever happens, don't start to change the later novels to fit better with the TV adaptation!

 

Regards,

Mark


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell.

After reading all of your books.. (and and I am still buzzing knowing that a 2nd series of novels have been converted into a tv series - [The Sharpe series and the Warlord Series]) I am wondering who is your all time favourite lead character?

Sharpe is a legend.. Uhtred will inevitably follow his inexorable fate .. Thomas of Hookton is a longbow god.. Starbuck is a fantastic character. Derfel Cadarn - Legend (possibly my favourite).. Rider Sandman, John Rossendale, Paul Shanhaan all great characters!  I guess It may be unfair to ask who is your favourite overall.. so I may just ask this instead - If there was no pressure from public demand, who would be your choice to bring to life to the 'Big Screen' in the way that YOU imagine him?

 

Keep up your masterclass writing skills sir!

 

Dave A

A

Well, my all time favourite character is Lady Grace from Sharpe’s Trafalgar, followed by Ceinwyn. Women are so much more interesting! I’m just happy that Uhtred is following Sharpe to the screen – though I would quite like to see Rider Sandman there too!


Q

Dear Bernard,

Like a multitude of your fans, I have to thank you for the enjoyment you have given me over the years. Your research is such that you have greatly improved my historical knowledge.

I have enjoyed, the Last Kingdom, Sharpe and the Grail quest series the most and the Arthurian novels the least but I will still give them a second reading. I have wondered why this series did not catch my imagination as much as your pot boilers. The conclusion I came to was that this series is based on myth.

This leads me to ask how you choose the periods in history you write about, which are diverse?   I read for example that you have no intention of writing about Ancient Rome? Are your choices based on your research, expertise or is there an element you perceive to be of particular interest and will you in set future novels in other historical eras?

Regards,

Jack

PS Like so many others I can't wait to learn of Uhtred's further adventures.

A

How do I decide?  Mainly by what appeals to me - simple as that!

 

 


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Hello Bernard

 

I hope you are well.

Firstly, I greatly enjoyed The Flame-Bearer, and without giving anything away for people who may not have read it, I was mildly surprised at the ending! I thought you would play that one out for a few more novels!

I also read Vagabond last Summer, NINE years after reading Harlequin! Heretic this Summer, I think!

I hope you'll be amused to hear I had a very vivid dream the other night, about thecNapoleonic Wars!  I was a Redcoat Sgt called Hobbs, and we had to get into a Fortress and scaled the walls with ropes. I can remember assuring a young Officer that we always won. Which, I'm sure around 1812/13, the Brits had started realising!

I can remember us singing as we stalked the Fortress looking for "Frogs". (possibly a bad strategy, if we were supposed to be surprising them!). I sang the Minstrel Boy. "Oh, glorious band, the chosen few, on whom the Spirit came.."

I can remember me and a young Marine bursting in on the French dining and I butchered a few with my bayonet. There was a bloody big scrap and I fought a couple of Indian Soldiers (not sure what they were doing there..), but the Officer I'd been with was killed. I'd promised nor  to leave his side, but..er...had...

Anyway, we killed the French, so HUZZAH!

I don't think dreams are covered by Copyright, so feel free to use this in any future Sharpe's!

Joking aside, do you ever dream about Sharpe or Uhtred of Thomas of Hookton? Or have you ever dreamt up a plot or character and then used it?

I wanted to read a Sharpe again, because its been a while, so after that dream there was only one I could read..Sharpe's Company! That was always one of my favourites.

Hope you don't think I've gone completely mad by telling you this!

Looking forward to Uhtred 11!

Warm Regards

Matt Copley

A

Didn’t you do well!  I am amused. I’m not sure if I ever have dreamed about my characters . . . I can’t believe I haven’t, but I don’t remember any nightmares. Maybe? Still, well done.


Q

Hello Mister Cornwell.

 

My name is Benoit, I am a french man who is 23 years old. I discovered The Saxon stories four years ago and I really love it. I really like Uhtred and the others characters, the environment... Since I am young, I love vikings stories, I love knights, I love History and when I read yours books, it s all time a pleasure. First, I wrote you to tell you thank you. Secondly, Can your translate yours books in French ? PLEASE. I continue to read them in english but it isn t the same sensation.

 

Your serie is more and more famous. More and more people know you. I really sure that you will make good sells in France ! So Translate them pleaseeee.

 

Have a good day.

A

I think my agent is seeking a French publisher, but so far no news.....


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I really enjoyed your books on The Last Kingdom series. I just finished The Flame Bearer, I was happy that Uhtred finally came home. I hope as you kind of suggest that this is not the end of the story of Uhtred. My question to you is, since the second season of the show aired this past Thursday. Will it be shown on BBC America in the near future, or will it just on Netflix?

Jim Ellis

 

We LOVE TLK, Season 1, and I have read all ten books ... Cannot wait to see Season 2 and heard it would begin March 16th. When will it be aired in the US?

Rita Coleman

A

I believe it will just be available on Netflix.  We should know the date it will be released soon!


Q

I have been an avid follower of all your books and have really enjoyed the Saxon Chronicles, so I was looking forward to the tv series. Why oh why have they changed his character so that Uhtred has become almost peripheral to the story? Secondly in 9th century Wessex apart from Alfred's daughter , women did not play any great part in the decision making nor in the management of their men. It seems that the 21st century  feminine agenda is taking over. For fans like me spoils it!

Charles Drakeford

A

I really can’t see that Uhtred is peripheral! And whether you like it or not Aethelflaed was an extremely important character in the making of England. She, more than anyone, bound Mercia to Wessex, which was the first stage of unification, and after her husband’s death she led campaigns against the Danes. You may be talking about the second series which I haven’t seen yet, but I suspect Uhtred would agree with me that the more women the merrier!


Q

I've read and re read all 10 (so far) of the last kingdom books and I'm struggling to work out where Osferth is. The Last I read he was looking after Uhtred's cousins wife and child. But nothing that I can see is mentioned in the following books other than Uhtred heard she and the boy died. I was mildly disappointed that he didn't help retake Bebbanburg in book 10. Can you shed any light on the situation?

Chris Barber

A

He did take a back seat in The Flame Bearer,but that doesn't mean he's vanished.  When I start the next book I'll know more!

 


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You do a really good job of researching your historical facts with what sources are to hand, so I was wondering how and from what source you were able to determine the ages of the brothers Lodbrok.  While their deaths seem fixed with some reasonable degree of accuracy, the only indication I have of the age of either brother is an unsourced wiki claim that Ivar was born in 794 (which seems highly dubious for a man on active and constant campaign in the 860s-70s).  Based on what you've said throughout the first three books (that Ivar's son is old enough to be Uhtred's father) and your description of Ubba as going gray where previously he was white, I'm assuming that Ivar was in his late forties to early fifties when he died, and Ubba about the same, with Ivar Ivarrson likewise in his forties.  Is that the right idea?  How did you ultimately estimate this, and what sources did you use?  I'd really love to know.

 

Steven

A

I’m fairly sure I simply guessed their ages! The records really don’t help much and were probably contradictory, and it is fiction! They call it licence, so I took it!


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Dear Bernard

 

I've just finished reading the Uhtred books again and the question I've been thinking about is would there have been an England in a similar time period without the catalyst of the Danish invasions? I've read that there seems to have been an ongoing struggle between the various kingdoms of England in the preceding centuries but no one seems to have emergent dominant for any significant time period until after the Danish invasions gradually left Wessex as the only remaining and then strongest Saxon kingdom as the Danes were pushed back. So I'm without the Danes would the four kingdoms of England have likely remained separate for much longer?

 

Though I appreciate it's only possible to speculate I would be grateful on any views you have on this matte as someone who has written extensively about that time period and events before and after?

 

I'm a big fan of the idea of alternate history but find it unfortunate that most writing on it seems to mainly focus on the 20th century when there seems to over a thousand years of fascinating history before that where things could have been vastly different.

 

regards

 

Matthew

A

That’s a very interesting question!  I suspect the answer is that the Danish threat was indeed the catalyst for the creation of a unified England. A common enemy makes unlikely alliances work. The destruction of the Anglo-Saxon dynasties of the northern kingdoms helped, leaving the Wessex dynasty as the one viable replacement. If personal ambition had got in the way (i.e. someone unwilling to surrender a throne) then it would all have been messier and probably taken longer. So yes. We can thank the Danes for England!

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

When will Uhtred's story continue? I can't wait!

I LOVE your work,

Janice Forler

 

Hello,

I just finished reading The Flame Bearer (great!) and was wondering if there will be an 11th book?

Thank you

Andrea

 

Mr Cornwell,

I am enjoying the TV series, but would love to know if/when we will get the next book in the series.

Many thanks for all your books.

Carol

A

I will most likely write a new Uhtred next year.


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I am just reading the 8th book in the Last Kingdom series. Being a woman, I find that there is a lot of blood and guts in the series. I have read other books about that time in history so I know it is true but life sure didn't mean much did it?

I was wondering though, when did the word shit come to be? I know that, originally, it meant "ship high in transit"but was that phrase common back in Uhtred"s time? I thought it came to be later on. Just Wondering.

Thank you for providing us with such a good pastime. The housework is beginning to pile up here.

Roberta from Vancouver Island (God's country)

A

‘Ship High in Transit’!!!!!! Never!  The word comes from the Old High German and morphed into the Anglo-Saxon word scitte, which was pronounced shit and means exactly the same thing. Whoever told you it came from Ship High in Transit was talking scitte!


Q

Hi Bernard,

 

Firstly, I just want to say that - along with everyone else here - I love your works. From Arthur, to Uhtred, to Thomas of Hookton, I've yet to read a book of yours I haven't loved. So thanks for your amazing stories.

 

Recently, I was doing a bit of reading around the wider Arthurian legend and saw that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle mentions a Saxon named Cerdic who (if he existed) later became one of the first kings of Wessex. I'm just wondering if this is the same Cerdic who is the enemy of Arthur and Derfel or if it is just coincidence?

 

Also, if it is intended, then am I right in saying that it means that one of your great heroes in Alfred is descended from one of your great villains in Cerdic. Perhaps there is scope to combine the two stories into one, gigantic saga, spanning all the way from Derfel, through to Uhtred and his capture of Bebbanburg. Maybe Finan could be descended from Oengus Mac Airem, and Brida descended from Nimue? Or am I just being greedy?

 

Either way, I love your work, and I check the website frequently for news of any upcoming works.

 

Many thanks for hours of entertainment,

 

Matt

A

I don’t think it is a coincidence, but I’m driven back to the old and feeble excuse that I wrote the Arthurian books so long ago that I’ve entirely forgotten them, indeed that there was even a Cerdic in those books!  But it rings a bell, however faint . . . .


Q

The Last Kingdom series:

Please, please, please tell me we can expect book 11 one day not too far away. I have all 10 previous books as audiobooks and just love them...I think I've gone through the entire series at least 5 times. I eagerly await book 11.

Thank you,

Kathryn

 

I have Spent the last 4 weeks listening via audible the entire last kingdom series and I have become hooked on them, I must have spent hours listening to them when I should have been doing other things. I have Just finished listening to the Flame Bearer. Simple question, now Uhtred has realised his dream will he become a settled man or will we hear from him again?

Tom Raworth

 

How many more books have you got planned for the last kingdom series?

James Geddes

 

When is the next book in the last Kingdom series anticipated?  I read the Flame Bearer in November and have enjoyed the series immensely.

Daniel L Kinnamon

 

Wanted to tell you how very much i have enjoyed your Grail Quest, Arthur and Last Kingdom Series of books!  I am a retired IBM statistician and own all these books.  Every few years i reread them from the beginning and enjoy savoring them once again, like a good bourbon:).  At the end of Flame Bearer you hinted that Uhtred may not be retired quite yet.  Like me i suspect he needs to keep mind and body exercised. I look forward to his next adventure!  When?

Gary Snyder

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story, but that is not the book I am writing now.  I cannot say when book 11 will be written - or how many more there might be in The Last Kingdom series....time will tell!


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Q

Hi Bernard,

 

As you are at pains to point out throughout Uhtred's saga, there has always been a very definite but exquisitely complex relationship between a lord and an oathgiver. That relationship is very much an exchange of responsibilities between the two parties, which breaches of duties towards the other party being grounds for the revocation of the binding agreement between them. One of the key elements was the expectation of the vassal to receive physical recognition of good service in the form of wealth, land and so on and again you quite rightly point this out more than once. My question is this; since we know that Uhtred was never entirely happy giving oaths to Alfred or Edward, (less so to Aethelflaed out of love), from memory of the stories, he seems to have been less than well rewarded for some fairly major acts of courage and success, or even not rewarded in any form, (I am thinking here after he was badly wounded at the end of The Pagan King and then his recovery at the start of the Empty throne - I assume because he was expected to die they didn't reward him at that point but surely afterwards?). I know there were times when Alfred had rewarded him with lands, but it does seem that for his deeds and loyalty he was treated less than generously and so, why did he not use those occasions to free himself from those unwanted oaths? I'm not trying to pick holes here, just interested  by Uhtred's decisions!

 

Best wishes

Andrew Parker

A

Remember that Uhtred does have a talent for annoying those who are in a position to help him, and usually at a most inconvenient moment.  I’m sure Alfred was extremely grateful for everything Uhtred achieved, but would never forgive him for his paganism and I suspect that influenced his purse.

 


Q

Surely you have written enough Saxon ,Viking and their ilk by now it's 21 years since the last Starbucks's chronicles book it must be time for another .

Anne Nash

 

Hello I'm a big fan of your work and followed your stories for many years through many different series but there is still one left unfinished. I'm sure you have been asked this many many times but will Starbuck fight again? I read what you have previously said about Sharpe becoming more popular and it making sense to write more Sharps and I can't fault that decision but it has been 20 years now is it not time for Starbuck to march one (or two) more time and finish his tale. I'm sure I'm not your only fan who feels this way. Thank you for taking the time to read this I know your a busy man.

Sincerely

Gareth.

(Ps. In saying this this I am also eagerly awaiting the next Uhtred book.)

A

Some day....I hope!


Q

Thanks for years of books! I have just experienced The Flame Bearer! I would love to see a diagram, a kind of architectural drawing, of Bebbanburg to go along with the pronunciation guide and map you always provide. Bebbanburg is the central "stage" of Uhtred's story. I would enjoy a drawing to help me see the Sea Gate beneath and all around the great gates and the buildings inside the castle. Again, thanks for your stories. I wait faithfully every year for a new one. (I am a 72 year old English teacher from Texas.)

Sharon Kingston

A

That’s a very good idea! I’ll try to provide a picture . . .

 


Q

Hi Bernard

I run a small Falconry Centre in the Orkney Islands Scotland. I am a keen reader of the Uhtred series. You refer to Hawks & Falcons regularly. I am trying to research information about Viking falconry, my Centre is in the groundsof an historic building. I  am keen to know if Falcons & Hawks are an interest of yours? & if you have any references to Vikings,Danes or Norsemen & Falcons?. I wish to build my historical knowledge to enhance my Falconry Displays.

I have read somewhere that Trained Falcons were once symbols of the control of Christianity & free birds a symbol of Pagan beliefs. When a Falcon is mentioned it appears that things go wrong for Uhtred. Is this a coincidence? ( I understand if this is not something you want to comment on ) Thanks for your time.

Keith

skaillhousefalconry.co .uk

A

I think it is a coincidence!  And, to be honest, I know very little about falconry other that what I’ve gleaned from reading T.H. White and Helen MacDonald’s wonderful H is for Hawk. Apologies!


Q

I just finished The Empty Throne and had a quick question about Uhtred's wound.  Perhaps I missed something, but was this wound just an infection from the cut and from the cow manure, and how was repiercing his side a cure.  I realize that 1000 years ago an infection was something very serious, but I was unsure if it was something more.  You alluded in the post-script to it being remotely possible to cure this way, but I was hoping for a little bit of clarity.  I haven't read any of your other book series, but I really enjoy the tales of Uhtred. Thanks.

Brad Capstick

A

I refer you to my medical adviser who, unlike me, is a doctor!  And yes, a bad wound could lead to infection, but not necessarily.  At the battle of Quatre Bras in 1815 Ensign Christie took (I think) 22 wounds, including a lance through the eye that emerged in his mouth, and he survived and, frankly, medical knowledge of infection was no more advanced in 1815 than in 815!  They did have some remedies that were surprisingly effective - spider-webs on a wound is one, and it works (to an extent).  But it was really a question of luck whether a wound went gangrenous or not.

 

 


Q

I have been reading you books for 35 years. I buy used British Versions on Ebay before the American version is released. I need more Books. I don't like other authors.

I believe you have unpublished Sharpe and Grail Quest Books and hopefully Uthred written awaiting beneficial contract timelines. When you die, hopefully not before 2035, will those unpublished books be printed quickly or continue annually like Mark Twain for 100 years?

Please release more Sharpe Novels, while I can still visit Spain, Portugal and France. I don't want to go the Belgium tho. If you release a couple more Uhtred novels and I'll even visit England. Thank-you

Mitchell C Johnson

A

Sorry to disappoint, but I do not have any unpublished manuscripts waiting to be published after my demise!


Q

Hi Bernard,

big fan here.  Just curious though I sadly suspect I know the answer.  Any more tales to come from the world of Derfel and co. in any way, or is the Arthurian tale done being told?

 

Also, just for fun, Uhtred v Derfel, single combat of champions, who wins? :)

 

Thanks for humoring me if you have a change to respond!

 

-Brad

A

I don't plan to add to Derfel's tale.

They're as good as each other, which is all you'll get from me!


Q

Good Morning Mr Cornwell,

 

I have as many people read the Saxon Chronicles and as many thoroughly enjoyed them. I am English (Geordie) and live not a stones throw away from Bamburgh (bebbanburg) Castle, I am so immersed in your books and the way you describe everything from battle to a quiet spring morning. Only one thing that gets me and it's not really anything to do with you in a way. I've obviously watched the first series on the "Last Kingdom" on the TV and there are one or two things that get me, 1, Uhtred's sword is in his back and not by his side 2, Father Beocca is isn't ugly or does not have a Club foot.

I know these seem silly but do you have any influence on the making of the series and if so would you be able to suggest to correct these as you are the author of these incredible books.

Uhtred is meant to be a large towering man but to be honest the actor who has taken this role does an outstanding job of brining Uhtred to life and wouldn't want him to be recast, they could use camera angles ect to make him look taller.

 

Well I hope you get time to have a look at what I have said, and I hope you manage to write many more excellent books

 

 

Regards

 

Chris Lumsdale

A

I have no influence, nor do I want it!  I like to think I know a thing or two about writing stories, but I know nothing about producing television drama, so the best thing is to stay clear and let the experts do what they do best!

 

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

Just finished reading Flame Bearer and I am left wondering if there will be another book/s to complete the series.  What happens next with Athelstan and the younger Uhtred?

Kind regards

Tony Lewis

New Zealand

 

I got the impression that, after reading The Flame Bearer, Uhtred, now in bebbanburg still has more to do. Is there another story to come? I really hope so.

regards,

David Tomlinson

 

A

There is more to come....


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Q

I recently came across an article claiming that scientists studying cat DNA have found cat remains at a Viking site dating to between the eighth and eleventh century A.D. in northern Germany. It makes sense that since Vikings were sea-faring people, they might have kept cats to control rodents. I could see cats hunting rats on Viking ships that were beached, but perhaps they accompanied their owners on their voyages, too.

 

I'm wondering, did Uhtred have any cats?

Joni Steshko

A

I’ve never thought about that!  He has dogs, of course, but cats? He might like it. Maybe in the next book?


Q

A good friend we met on a Viking River Cruise back in 2009 put me on to your writing, initially the Last Kingdom series, and I have been hooked ever since.  After retiring six years ago, I have devoted myself to tracking down copies of that series plus other stand alone novels.  I have read 12 total including six of the Last Kingdom and have three or four others calling my name. (I also watched the TV series).   Every book has held my attention from start to finish except the Fort.  For me, this book was a change from the others because I read about half over a two month period and then gave up.  Please do not take this as anything more than a comment about the Fort only because I am presently engrossed in Stonehenge.  I had learned that Paul Revere was not the hero we learned about in school after reading Paul Revere's Ride by David Fischer.  Longfellow did no favors for students of US history with his poem.

 

Anyway, the stories of Viking travels to Great Britain are fascinating.  I am half Swedish and speak the language, half Danish, find many town names in the UK with Scandinavian roots, and have traveled to Scandinavia on several occasions. A history I read several years ago claimed that original Swedes were much shorter than what one sees in films, but dark haired with fair skin.  Uhtred meets that description in the TV series and old buildings visited from the 17th and 18th centuries seem to bear out people were short. Will there be any more episodes in the TV series?

 

I have rambled on enough.  FYI, I have enjoyed several fiction and non fiction books on the Knights Templar .  Do not interpret this as anything more than sharing a reading topic.  I also like Steve Berry, Tolkien, George Martin, Frank Herbert (I met him at the University of Washington in the early 70s, but that is a different story), and other authors of historical novels.  My friend encourages me to track down Sharpe novels but that will be a project after the Last Kingdom.  Please keep those stories coming.

 

Ron

A

There will be more episodes!  We should learn when Season 2 will be available soon!


Q

Hiya. I know you're not working on the Uhtred books right now but should we expect book 11 this year? Thank you x

Zoe

A

Not this year...


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

I am writing to thank you for such a gripping series of books. I have just finished reading The Flame Bearer (I think book 10 in the series) and can honestly say that I have not enjoyed such enthralling stories for a long time. The character of Lord Uhtred is both humorous and impressive, and I have opened each book with excitement.

 

Although Uhtred has just recaptured his home of Bebbenberg, and so the series could  end here, I would love to know if you have any plans to continue his tale. It has inspired me to read non-fiction about this period in our history.

 

I am just about to begin reading the first of the Arthurian Warlord Chronicles, and am anticipating great stories!

 

With kind regards,

 

Elizabeth Ashley

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I first read "1356" and was hooked (pun intended) on Thomas of Hookton.  He is a compelling character and I am enthralled by the history of the period as a result of reading that book.  So I've gone about this backwards and had to go back to the beginning of the Grail Series to experience the origin of the character.  Now I'm two books into the Saxon books.  Uhtred is a marvelously conflicted character and I'm looking forward to the remainder of the series.  Of course I had to have a look at Agincourt in the interim and there was one thing that struck me immediately: By your naming the protagonist Nicholas HOOK I  wondered if an unstated relationship with Thomas was being hinted at; not important, really, just curious.  So I have a new hobby, namely, to read as many of your books as possible except that it seems you are writing them faster than I can read them!

Best wishes.

P.S. Are you performing Shakespeare this summer?

A

I didn't intend to hint at a relationship - I took the name from the muster roll of the archers who really were at Agzincourt and it just happened to be the name I liked best and, by coincidence, shared the Hook with Hookton.

 

Yes!  I'm hoping to be back on stage at the Monomoy Theatre this summer.

 

 

 


Q

Dear Bernard,

Firstly I would like to thank you for inspiring my love of reading, I started with the sharpe books which I still love. Obviously Sean bean was greatly cast for the tv role and this is what initially sparked my interest. However sharpe was left behind when I read the stories of Thomas of Hookton and Starbuck, and of course now especially since I'm from the north east and a regular visitor Bambrugh as a child, Uhtred I think is your greatest creation to date. I just wondered how you felt about the casting of Uhtred, no doubt a talented actor but I can't replace the image I have had in my head for years. I look forward to hearing from you.

Keep up the great work

Steven Forth

A

I think Alexander is doing a tremendous job, and I can't wait to see Season Two!


Q

Greetings, Mr. Conrwell.

I hope you are doing well!

 

I believe I have sent you a message before, but I am unsure if this is the case. At any rate, I would like to say great praises to your stories. I was introduced to your works back in Mid 2011, my senior year at school. I read the first book of the Arthur Series, The Winter King, and was overjoyed to read a very gripping tale of fiction. I wasn't an avid reader at that point (having read only J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter books until then). But thanks to you, I was able to get great inspiration as well as a good motivation to read more. My grandfather, being an avid book reader himself, recommended more of your works, and that's when I bought the remaining Arthur books, The Enemy of Good and Excalibur, and read them. I have only good things to say, and it is a great book that mixes lots of themes well, being Leadership, Compromise, Friendship, Allegiances and so much more. By 2014, I began reading The Saxon Chronicles, and dare I say, it is my favorite series of ALL time. The story is forged with blood, battles, betrayal and non-stop action, and I truly love it! I have all the 10 books so far, and I plan on getting the first 5 ones in hardcover (I am not sure, I am a great fan of hardcover books, and I consider it a sign of... "respect" to a series I like so much?). I truly love many characters in it, Uhtred, Gisela, Finan, Alfred, Aethelflaed, Ragnar, Leofric, Steapa, and so many others. I believe one of the best antagonists you have done (with the exception of the 10th book, as I have not read it so far!) is Skade, Cnut Longsword, Erik Thurglisson, and Kjartan. Skade and Kjartan for being cruel villains, who wouldn't think twice to torture their victims before death (Hell, Skade is seen flaying Edwulf, and it was a very striking scene to me. I am not sure why, but I see flaying/skinning as one of the worst tortures ever to exist, and I can't help but to love and hate the characters who do that.). As for Cnut and Erik, while not related, they seemed more like the anti-villains, two characters you can get used to and like their ideals, despite being on the "opposing team", and this is very nice for a story, as it is possible get behind the Saxons as well as the Danes, not being a "Black and White" moral fiction.

 

With all that said, I truly look forward to reading the Sharpe novels, as well as the Starbuck Chronicles, as the Napoleonic Wars and the American Civil War seem like great periods of time, and sadly, two that I don't know much of!

 

I have a few questions for you:

1 - The Arthur Series had not only a map detailing every location included on the series, but also a character list. I noticed the absence of that in The Saxon Chronicles, and wanted to know if you do plan on bringing this back on the newer releases? I say that because at times, we can't help to remember every character's name, and having a list of characters on an appendix really does help to memorize the ones present within the story. With that, see this as a personal "request" of sorts, as I believe a release of an appendix would be very much welcome to many readers!

2 - In the later books of The Saxon Chronicles, there is an "absence" of the year the story is set. It must be due to Uhtred getting old (can't blame him! haha) but I confess I am a person that particularly likes to pinpoint the years in which the story is set. With that being said, I would like to know if we could consider the dates the historical characters being on the series? For example: Ragnall Ivarson, that died on year 921 last I saw, and pinpoint that to being where the story is set in The Warriors of the Storm, or not quite?

 

Also, this is a nice little disclaimer: Your stories has motivated me into getting a new hobby: writing. I will of course, not request you to read the script, as my stories will be set in the present time, and it will be a much different focus as your stories take place, but rather, this is a way of saying "Thank you" for writing such amazing stories and motivating many youngsters to get the taste of literature, and bringing many veterans to appreciate the historical fiction.

 

Sincerely,

Patrick Gainher

A

We'll keep that under consideration.

 

That sounds about right . . . I do try to mention the year, but perhaps it didn’t make it into a couple of the books.

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

I was recently introduced to your Saxon Stories series and have very much enjoyed the numerous hours of entertainment that you have now provided me.  Thank you for that gift.

 

As I immersed myself in the many vivid battles you described, I found myself asking the question, "Where are the siege craft?" Granted, I am only halfway through the books so perhaps my question will be answered with due time and patience.

 

I understood that siegecraft (ballista, mangonels, rams and the like) were used by the Danes in the siege of Paris in 885 and certainly these were present in the Roman Empire.  As Uhtred is a clever young dux bellorum, well schooled with the 'modern' art of war for his time and well aware of the benefits of French steel and trade, I am surprised that these have not been mentioned so far.

 

Siegecraft would seem to provide an opportune solution for Bebbanburg and, if not for the well, the now fallen Dunholm.

 

Many thanks for the fantastic stories.

Michael

A

They’re not mentioned because it seems the Danish troops in Britain didn’t employ them. They never succeeded in capturing a burh, which they surely would have done if they’d employed siege engines. Such things aren’t mentioned in any of the contemporary sources, and the conclusion is that they simply did not exist. Remember that to employ those engines needed a good deal of organization and expertise, and the rather free-wheeling bands of Danes in Britain appear to have lacked both.

 


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I finished Flame Bearer and I love how Uhtred recover his ancient family hold.

I have a question: The vikings saga said that Ragnar had a lot of sons, Ivar, the boneless, Ubbe, Halfdan, who are mentioned in Saxon Stories, and two other sons, Bjorn Ironside and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye. Why do you choose don't mention them? By sagas, Sigurd was """First legendary king of modern Denmark""" and Bjorn """first legendary king of  modern Sweden""". Bjorn was mentioned to participated of Great Heathen Army who landed Nortumbria in 866. Do you preferred don't include him in story by literary issues?

 

Other thing, the real person who Uhtred was inspired was Uhtred, the bold? Because you're descendant of Uhtred who inspired the story, and I discovery that I'm descendant of Uhtred the bold by his grandson Gostaparic, by a family called Drummond, who was thane of Lennox (I think was that) in Scotland. If is that Uhtred, then we are distant relatives.

 

I'm your fan, love Saxon Stories and Sharpe books!

 

Thanks by attention Mr. Cornwell.

Lucas

A

You can’t mention everyone! I tell stories, and the more unnecessary characters there are in a story, the more confusing it is. An historian might feel the need to be comprehensive, but I don’t!


Q

I am just now watching Last Kingdom, based on your Uhtred novels and there is something really bothering me. If I recall your novel properly, and I'm sure I do, Saxons fought in a shield wall -- linking shields, and either waiting for the enemy to come to them or moving forward more or less as a unit to make contact. What then ensued was a stabbing battle, over, under, between shields in hopes of wearing the enemy down. In the Netflix version, no such thing happens! Have you seen it? They have the Danes forming a shield wall, two shields high, and a third shield over the heads of the first rank such as the Roman's Tortoise maneuver. Another history enthusiast and I had a spirited discussion over this, and because he is a Norse re-enactor, claims the Vikings (Norse, Danes, call them what you will) learned this from the Romans, and (probably) took it into battle against the Saxons. Yet in your books, your research stated the Norse didn't fight in fixed ranks such as the Saxons did, but preferred to be more fluid and fought more or less individually so as to more easily adjust to changes in the battle. Who's right?!

Al Lowe

A

In my books both sides form a shield wall and I’m at a loss to know where you got the opposite impression. My fault, probably. Personally I loved the way the film-makers treated the shield wall! It was magnificent!

 


Q

Hello!

I am obviously a great fan of Your writing ( especially Uhtred ) and currently trying to persuade myself that I can also write a historical fiction. From one of your videos available on youtube I learned that you still read tremendous amounts of history and that I assume helps in writing stories about Uhtred, Richard Sharpe etc. My question is if you have ever considered  writing a story about non-anglo heroes? Will Your knowledge about 18th/19th century world, political situation, events etc be enough to write a story that follows ( for example ) Tadeusz Kosciuszko? And how long do you think research for this sample story could take You. I am Polish myself and for that reason I would love to apologize for my terrible English. I do try and improve it ( this is where your fantastic writing comes very helpful ).

Kind Regards

Pawel Ulinski.

A

The short answer is no! And that’s not because I have some loathsome prejudice against foreigners, but simply because I’m most comfortable writing within a society I know and (I hope) understand. If I were to write about some splendid foreign hero I’d need to soak up language, customs, attitudes, all the things that I learned growing up, and the result, I believe, would be unconvincing. As for research time – too much! Research is a lifelong activity and catching up to a new culture would be immensely time-consuming. I know other writers do it, and good luck to them, but I’ll stick to what I know best.

 

 


Q

How did Uhtred end up in the monastery? Is there a book 11 that tells us?

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all 10.

Satchidananda

A

There is not a book 11.....yet....


Q

When are you going to finish the Starbuck Novels?

John L'Amie

 

I just finished your  Starbuck series. Great stuff!. Your Historical Note of The Bloody Ground ended with, "Starbuck will march again." Just one question, when?

Charlie Rupnick

 

Are we going to see any more of Nate Starbuck? I really like all of your work and would like to see Nate finish the Civil War.

Thank you,

Bob

 

 

Any Starbuck books coming?

Steve Rodriguez

 

 

Hi Bernard,

I've just finished The Flame Bearer . It is Uhtred back at his brilliant best.What's next and when ? Also, my son is a huge fan of the 'Copperhead 'series is there any chance of the series being continued ?

Regards.

Chris Page

 

A

I''m not sure when?


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Q

Hi

It might be better If Uhtred kept his estate in the midlands as it gives him a reason to travel south, as you said he did when he was older in an earlier book when he burnt the scrolls in the monastary.

 

Colin

A

I’m sure he’s kept a lot of them . . . they’d be managed by a factor who would remit the rents. I’ll try to sort it out!

 


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell

I have just finished reading the Flame Bearer. Along with the rest of the Last Kingdom Series, these are the best fiction books depicting the turbulent  story of the creation of England.

What would you think of the books being included in the National Curriculum?

I am sure they would bring alive this part of early English history for many students.

Looking forward to meeting Uhtred again.

 

kind regards

 

Mike Newell

A

I do think the English should learn about the origins of England!  Maybe they do? Of course if you make the books part of the National Curriculum you immediately condemn them as ‘necessary’ reading. Much better to let them discover them on their own (but I’ll let you disagree!)


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Q

I've just finished 'Ida', and enjoyed that read just as I've enjoyed the others in this series and others you have written too. I looked too at some of the Qs and As and noted that in one response you mention how Uhtred is getting older now so perhaps confused. That might explain the slavery point, He claims that he was sold into slavery by his Uncle. My memory of the previous books is that this isn't so - or is it my memory that fades?

 

yours,

Peter Barley

A

His uncle arranged his capture . . . and paid money. It wasn’t a direct transaction, but in effect he was sold!

 

 


Q

Happy New Year Bernard.

 

Whilst listening to Uhtred's story from start to finish again of the Christmas period, quite a few 'what if's' drifted into my mind as they tend to do from time to time. I won't bother you with most of them, but I am curious if you have any thoughts about the implications and effects on the relationship between Alfred and Uhtred if the latter had fully converted and remained a devout Christina in Alfred's service. Both men clearly respected the other and it seems to me that there had been, on Alfred's part, a desire like Uhtred and foster a friendship, which was soured over the years. I wonder if you fee that had Uhtred been a committed Christian, Alfred would have allowed his merit to raise him to higher levels of lordship. perhaps in place of his cousin, or even to become a sanctioned king under Alfred's overarching rule. If this had happened and Uhtred had been allowed freedom to run the campaign against the Danes freely and with Alfred's full backing, do you think the results would have been wildly different in terms of effectiveness and duration?

Had Uhtred been a Christian and in Alfred's good graces, do you think he might have been allowed permission to marry Aethelflaed, and had that union brought forth sons in Alfred's lifetime, would he have recognised the potential for a stronger ruling line from that branch of the family and put them ahead other potential succesors? Alfred showed he could be ruthless, having usurped the throne himself, and I wonder if he would have weighed the future of his kingdom ahead of having Edward follow him

 

Best wishes

 

Andy

 

Of course this is all just idle musings but it does intrigue me!

 

Best wishes

 

Andy

A

I’m not sure what territorial advantages a Christian Uhtred would bring Alfred . . . the immediate ambition was to engorge Mercia into Wessex (which didn’t really happen until after Alfred’s death), and Northumbria was a very distant target. Marriage to Aethelred had tangible advantages – it placed a West Saxon marker on nearby territory!  Uhtred, being an exile from his native Northumbria, and not possessing any land there (except his claim to the land) would have brought no such advantage.

 


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Q

Hi Bernard,

 

I have always been an avid reader of history, especially military history. My father introduced me to your books on Uhtred and I have devoured them until I became caught up a few years back. I also came across a computer game called "Mount & Blade - Warband" which had an additional patch titled "Viking Conquest". It seems to me that the game is inspired by your works, and does include a character named Uhtred floating about. In summary, the game pretty much let's you play out your Saxon or Viking fantasy of raiding, fighting, and conquering, enemies like Æthelhelm, etc...and/or usurp them all and create your own kingdom. Personally, I found Brycheinoig and Cornubia ripe territories on which to found my Viking kingdom, but now have the pesky Irish raiding my lands.

 

I was wondering if you have seen or heard of the game, and if not you should check it out! Although, I do fear it may hamper your writing of the next Uhtred book.

 

-Best,

David F

A

I was not aware of it - thanks!


Q

Good day Mr. Cornwell:

I just wanted you to know that I recently read "Gallows Thief" and very much enjoyed it and although this is a bit selfish on my part, I was hoping to convince you that writing a series, not too dissimilar to the Uhtred series, would be a good idea. I have read numerous books of yours and have enjoyed following the Uhtred novels.  The cast of characters in the "Gallows Thief" would seem to me to be perfect for a series of books that follow Rider Sandman, sergeant Berrigan and Sally.  This is an interesting time in Europe and the cast of characters sets forth an equally interesting spectrum of social actors.  You could mine a wide array of situations and social settings by having them work together as a team similar to what you set forth in "Gallows Thief".  The way the book ends seems as if you were already setting this up (hopefully).  Well, I just wanted to plant this seed in hopes that you would write a few more books that followed these characters -- I think many people could relate to them and would enjoy following their exploits.

Thanks for your time,

Rich Coon

A

I have considered a follow-up to Gallows Thief.....not sure if I'll get to it....


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Q

Dear Bernard:

It's been some years since I wrote.  Never could solve the Sharpe's Father riddle!  The last time I wrote I was in Afghanistan and you kindly sent several books for the troops -- they were greatly appreciated!  I hope they are still being passed around Kandahar Airbase!

I am reading The Flame Bearer and find it another great story!

I read that what you are currently is not Uhtred's next adventure.  Can you give us a hint where you are taking us to next?

 

Merry Christmas

Scott Evans

A

I’m still finding out for myself – something different. I won’t risk bad fortune by saying just what it is!


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Q

What happened to the estate Uhtred was given by Alfred? There is no mention of if it in further books. I would have expected an income from it and from Dunholm when he took over it, so I was surprised when in the latest book you said he was short of money again.

Colin Rowland

 

A

He’ll survive!  I’ll have to think about that estate . . . I have a feeling he lost it (but how and why I’m not yet sure)


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I am a (relative) neighbor of yours, living in Summerville, SC.  I have LOVED reading your Saxon series!  My ancestors came to America in the 1700's and my surname is of Scottish origin.  Following is a possible lineage.

 

The progenitor of the Irish family of Fordyce, from which descend all the Fordyce's of Washington and Greene Co.'s Pa. was one

 

  1. Hugh Fordyce b. in Drumasole Co. Antrim, Ireland, in 1527. marrying July 3, 1552, Mary Conyngham, of Kilbirnie, Co. Ayr, Scotland, daughter of Patrick Conyngham, of that ilk and this would tend to indicate that Hugh, himself, or his father, had come from Scotland, presumably from Ayrshire. What his father's name was we do not know, as yet. (Conyngham Coll. 69) Children: Mary, Sarah, Martin of whom presently, Hugh, John.

 

Hopefully, you are still reading...  because this is where I would like to make a request.  There still remains a Fordyce Castle near Aberdeen, not too far from your Bebbanburg.  Maybe you can insert a Fordyce into your chronicles (as a hero of course), just sayin', ha.  Maybe Uhtred could have run into some Fordyce's in his travels around the northern parts of Scotland, what do you think???  I don't think this would fall into the category of suggesting plotlines or some other irregularity, so think about it a bit...

 

I hope to start on the Sharpe series soon, as I really enjoy the historical novels and your storytelling is getting to be addictive!!

 

Happy New Year and best to you,

Christopher Fordyce

A

I’ll bear it in mind . . . I suspect the surname emerged long after Uhtred’s time? But I will try to work a Fordyce in somewhere, some place!


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Q

Hi

I have read and enjoyed the entire Uhtred series (but don't like the series Last Kingdom - doesn't follow the book, or make as much sense). But, in the early books Hrothweard is an enemy of Uhtred, and in Flame Bearer Uhtred has never heard of him. He seems like the same character but now is an archbishop.

 

Thanks for some terrific stories,

Les

A

They were different characters – the name wasn’t uncommon.


Q

First and foremost I have truly enjoyed this entire series....I read in a few months what took you years to create. I recently finished book 10 and can't wait for Uhtred to continue his journey. I've truly never enjoyed a series or a book as much as this from the first page until the last. Just wanted to say job well done and ask when the next one will be released?

TY Chad

 

Will there be future books of Uhtred?

Linda O'Connell

 

Hi Mr Cornwell,

Having read a lot of books from the Templars era, plus "les rois maudits", Robyn Young's Brethen and Scotland trilogy, I then got my hands on your 1356 book!  I was then hooked.  I got myself all the Last kingdom books of the series at that time (last year) (9 books - one shot).  I am now reading The flame Bearer and I am anxious to know if there will be a 11th book.  Your Uhtred story is marvelous...I had a lot of pleasure reading your work and I thank you for that.

François Beaulieu

 

Just to let you know how much enjoyment your books bring to me whenever I read one as i find them difficult to shut once opened.  I was just wondering how long we will have to wait for your next novel in the series?  Many thanks always a brilliant read.

David Allanson

 

So I finished book 10, The Flame Bearer, just before bed last night.  I was amazed I was able to immediately fall asleep despite my elevated heart rate from the excitement of the book.  One observation - for some reason I almost loathed Uhtred for slaughtering his cousin.  But that feeling didn't last long.

Clearly there will be a book 11 of this series. Any idea when?

Best wishes!

Tom Keyser

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story....stay tuned!


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

finished the "Flame Bearer" a few weeks ago. First time in english, i am not native english speaking. Fantastic was Uhtreds "inner monologue" about warriors. Must read it loud to my son. The peak part of the story, great!

 

Besides: Aethelflead calls someone the "bishop of York"? Never heard of York in that story. Where or what ist it? :-)

: Ulrich Noll

A

That should have been Eoferwic or Jorvik . . . .

 


Q

Loved your Flame Bearer and all others. Not a real fan of our civil War, however. You indicated decent from Uhtred. How was this determined? Using internet search engines like ancestry.com or inspecting UK source documents? What does "crapard"mean?

Bob Nearine

A

Crapaud? It’s the French for ‘toad’ and the nickname the British gave to their French enemies. It’s been suggested that the fleur de lys on the French flag looks like a toad, or frog, seen from above, but I have no idea if that’s the real source.

I really don't know too much about my ancestors - the Uhtred of the books is invented (though there was a man by that name in that period).  What I know was discovered by a member of my birth family.  The surname is distinctive enough to make them quite easy to trace through a tangle of records.

 

 

 


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Q

Hi Bernard,

My girlfriend and I had the immense pleasure to meet you in York a few months ago when you were interviewed and stayed to sign copies of your books to celebrate the release of The Flame Bearer. You won't remember us of course, but Zoë thanked you profusely for your creations and demanded, in the way women do, that you never let Uhtred die because she loves him. She really does, too. I made an off hand comment about my relationship being usurped by Uhtred and you laughed and also complemented her pagan hammer around her neck. Anyway, since then, it's been our running joke that the next book will have 'usurper' in the title. She'd be livid if you were influenced by me and not her; I'm just here to say, if you want to use 'usurper' in the title, it's ok by me! If not, just weaving the word alone in the book somewhere or other will put me 'one up' in our relationship for eternity. I'm sure you'll do the right thing! Keep up the brilliant work, it was great to meet you.

Ben G.

A

Usurper!  That’s good! It might well happen . . . . . maybe not the next Uhtred, but it will fit beautifully for another story I have in mind for him. Tell Zoe that Uhtred pines for her! And Happy Christmas!

 


Q

I love your Last Kingdom Series.. I see The Flame Bearer is out now and it appears it will be the last book, I will be purchasing it asap!  Will you continue with his son or with another character from the series?  Uhtred has become my absolute favorite character in literature and I am hoping you will provide a 2nd favorite. Reading the books makes me want to stand in the shield wall with Uhtred close enough to my enemies to smell their breathe and step in their shit after I kill them. It must be love if I would be willing to do that LOL.  Thank you so much for hours of entertainment!!

Shayne Bickford

 

Hello,

First of all, I absolutely love the Saxon Tales so thank you so much for all the research and everything else you did to make them as real and thought provoking as they are. I've read all of them several times and they often get me through hard times. I think everyone suffers from some form of depression or anxiety even if they don't realize it and I'm not exempt. I enjoy the audio books most of all as it seems to bring them to life and I can listen to them at work. Ok. I feel like I could go on about me and how much your books have effected me but I know you are a real person with a life and schedule and not the mythical figure I have in my head so I'll get to my question. I'll just get right to it and if you can't answer then I understand.

Is the Flame Bearer the last book in this series?

I'll buy the print copy when I can and if you answered this in an authors note at the end then I'll hopefully read it there. Thank you for the stories. May they last until Ragnarok.

Zach Reeb

 

I have just finished reading The Flame Bearer but was not sure if this was the last book in the series?  I was hoping it might cover Æthelstan's rule and the uniting of England. I think it's great that you are putting the spotlight on Æthelstan as he had nearly disappeared from history but seemed to achieve so much.

Simon White

 

Will you be writing another book on the Saxon Tale, I hope there is a another book, I will be disappointed, if it ends with this book. Your books are the best., and I enjoy them all.

Lea Croston

A

The Flame Bearer is not the last book of the series - there will be more to Uhtred's story.


Q

Dear Bernard,

I've come late to your books and especially enjoy the Saxon Tales with Uhtred of Bebbanburg which I've read three times up to the 8th book.  I'll be getting the 9th when I return to Maui.

The movement of the Saxons from Germany westward to Britain -- and then to North America is an intriguing thing to look at especially since we now seem to have an Apex Saxon as president.  There is much debate about immigration, but nothing is given, everything is taken...  In your books, the invader, first the Saxons in the Arthurian era and then the Danes in the Saxon tales have to fight for their right to party.

If you were to write a contemporary story of this latest “soft” invasion, from what position would your protagonist take?

Thanks — and I look forward to the continuation of the Saxon Tales even though I know they must end…

Best,

Malcolm

A

I wouldn’t know until I wrote it! And, I’m sorry, it’s a most unlikely subject for me!


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Hi Mr. Cornwell.

Here's a question that recently occurred to me: In the afterword to some of your Uhtred novels, you state that England stood in the balance during the Viking Invasions, and if Alfred had lost, it would have been Daneland and we in America would be speaking some form of Danish.  But a little more than a century later, William the Conqueror took over England and did away with the Saxon way of things.  Yet England remained, it did not become "Normanland" are we are not speaking some form of Norman-French today.  Why is it that the Danish/Norse conquest would have done away with England and the the Norman Conquest did not?

Alan Kempner

A

True, of course, but William’s conquest only replaced the thin upper layer of the English aristocracy, it wasn’t a folk movement of tribes and families.  The Danes came in huge numbers . . . not enough, as it turned out, but the two invasions were of quite different character.


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

You're my favorite author and I've read most of your books (several times in some cases). I am greatly looking forward to Uhtred's next adventure. My question is are you entirely through with Richard Sharpe, or is there any chance of another tale at some point?

Leslie C Guilland

A

Oh, I think there's a chance...


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Hi again, Mr. Cornwell.

Whenever anyone asks you when you'll continue the Starbuck Chronicles, your standard answer in "I hope to get back to Starbuck one of these days."  I am thinking that the day when you put the capstone on Uhtred's story and finish the last book in his saga would be a good candidate for "one of these days" to pick up Nate's story again.  Do you agree?

Alan Kempner

 

A

Won't know until I get there!


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Hello Mr. Cornwell,

I was wondering how you create the scenarios and strategies that Uhtred utilizes to defeat his enemies.  Are you drawing upon tactics documented to have been used during the actual battles, or are you creating them yourself, or a mix of both?

Thanks, from a fan,

Brett

A

Mostly I make them up!


Q

Hello,

 

I'm a big fan of the Uhtred series, especially so the different take on many well known figures of the viking era. It's especially enjoyable at a time when interest in the tales of Ragnar and his sons is increasing again in the English speaking world.

 

Due to my own family history, I'm particularly interested in Ivar The Boneless - as I believe the MacLeods may have descendants of the historical Ivar's descendants, though it's sketchy whether the Ivar who invaded England and the Ivar who held fiefdom in part of Ireland were truly the same - and this brings me to Sigtrygg. The historical Sigtrygg was not only King of Dublin, but Ivarsson. In your series we've already met Ivar's son and grandson, but I don't recall any mention of Sigtrygg and his brother being related to them. Is their father another man named Ivar in this series, or is he a distant relation/descendant of Uhtred's old acquaintances?

 

Thank you for the hours of enjoyment spent reading these tales. I look forward to many more, and I intend to start on your other books soon.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Graeme McLeod

A

I tried to keep the relationships out of the novel, it just complicates amd doesn’t add to the story . . . and anyway, I fear my Sigtryggr has drifted too far from his historical roots. Mea culpa.


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In the first Uhtred book, he says meeting the girl Alfred slept with (called Merwenna) was very significant. Are we supposed to assume he got her pregnant? It's weird that he's only fathered 3 kids in all these years....

Cathy

A

Oh, he’s fathered a lot more, but I can’t include everything!

 


Q

Dear Bernard,

Firstly, a point of information. In all the chronological lists of the Sharpe series, Sharpe's Havoc is listed as after Sharpe's Eagle, which surely cannot be right. Havoc is Spring '09 and Eagle is July '09. Plus, Rifleman Pendleton was alive in Havoc and died at Talavera, ("only seventeen and so many pockets left to pick").

I also noticed a previous correspondent wondering why Sharpe never met any Polish Lancers. I noted your reply, but if you recall, Sharpe, or rather Major Kearsey, did meet Polish Lancers in Sharpe's Gold. Admittedly Sharpe didn't face them in the open field, but he certainly met them in the dead of night in the Spanish village.

The Flame Bearer, you will be pleased to note, was the top hard back seller in the UK as of a week ago, but what I find curious is that I have not seen one newspaper review of the book in the British papers. I wonder why that should be?

Keep up your wonderful work, Sir, and I look forwarded eagerly to your next offering. Much as I've loved Uhtred, I do hope it's a Sharpe.

Regards

John Hill

A

You're right!  Sharpe's Havoc does come before Sharpe's Eagle.  I think some earlier books may have the chronological listing incorrect but, hopefully! it's been corrected in more recent books.  And the correct listing of all my books by series can be found on this page:

www.bernardcornwell.net/books-by-bernardcornwell/

 

I’d forgotten, thank you!

 

They have limited space for book reviews and, quite sensibly, use it for what they think should interest their readers. A lot of books, a lot, never get reviewed and they may take the view that a new novel in an established series doesn’t need to be drawn to their readers’ attention?


Q

Would you consider interrupting the chronology of the Saxon stories in future novels, as per the Sharpe series?  While I am eager to see our hero reclaim his birthright at Bebbanburg, it would be refreshing to read about further adventures of younger Uhtred. Certainly there must be some gaps to fill in Saxon history that involve Uhtred and his impressive companions (Alfred, Pyrlig, Staepa....to name a few) during their prime.

Jeff

A

I won’t say it will never happen . . . but on the whole it’s not something I like doing. So that’s a definite maybe?


Q

Mr Cornwell,

Sir,  What a captivating author you are.

Loved the Sharpe books

But Uhtred is awesome,  best character ever. Did a 700mile round trip to Bebbenberg just to feel a part of this tape Just finished the flame   bearer. Brilliant.  Need more books to tell his tale,  can we expect some and if so when?

Thanks for so many hours of pleasure.

Dane

A

There will be more to Uhtred's story


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Hello Bernard,

I just wanted to say a big thank you for your books. Until seeing the TV version of The Last Kingdom I had read very little fiction and certainly never any historical fiction. Well I wanted to find out more about Uhtred and have just finished the 9th book in the series and along the way have taken on board The grail quest and books on Arthur. A question just occurred to me out of the blue. I'm sending it to you with tongue in cheek - will you in a future book be revealing how Uhtred at a late age in his life found the energy, time, space, ink, parchment and facility to write so much about himself and stash the said writings away to be found so well preserved then published?!

 

Thanks again, very best wishes

Yano

A

It’s possible . . . I have thought about that!


Q

I was just wondering how familiar you are with your family connection to Bamburgh Castle? I know I had in the past read an article where you mentioned when your family's possession of the Castle ended, but I don't remember what it was. I have just today finished Marc Morris' excellent book "The Norman Conquest". At the beginning of the book he covers some of the events that lead up to the Conquest, including how Edward the Confessor came to be King of England. In this vein, he covers the story of Uhtred of House Bamburgh, also known as Uhtred the Bold, the final Anglo Saxon Earl of Northumbria and the murder of his son and usurpation of Bamburgh Castle by Siward Digri. I thought this little nugget fit perfectly in my current reading, as I am also rereading the Saxon Stories in anticipation of the American release of "Flame Bearer".  I was wondering if you knew where exactly your particular branch of the family fit into this snippet of time in history. It is highly interesting, and would make your familiy connection to the Saxon Stories, and especially to "The Last Kingdom" possibly much deeper than you might have thought as it could also make you a lineal descendant of not only the real Uhtred the Bold, but of Bjorn Ironside, son of Ragnar Lothbrok and brother of Ivar the Boneless, Halfdan, Sigrud Snake in the Eye and, of course, Ubba. I won't post the breakdown of my reasoning, as I have a few more questions and don't want to create an even larger wall of text than I had already planned on.

 

I have also began reading "The Plantagenets " by Dan Jones. I apologize if this a time period in history that you don't get to study much, as you haven't written about it, but if I understand the geneology of Henry the II correctly, is he the lineal descendant of not only Rollo of Normandy and William the Conqueror, but also a number of characters in the Saxon Stories like Alfred, and Edward, but also of Kings Duncan and Malcom of "Macbeth", thus making him an ancestor of the real Macbeth?

 

Lastly, when you orignially wrote "the Warlord Chronicles", did you already envision writing a series involving Alfred the Great? I only ask because Your description of him looking like a Preist or Clerk are almost identical to your descriptions of Cerdic. So I was wondering if the Saxon Stories were in your head when you wrote that, or if you just used your description of Cerdic as a basis for Alfred. Sorry for the wall of text, and I can't wait to read Flame Bearer.

 

Thanks,

Luke

A

I really don't know too much about my ancestors - the Uhtred of the books is invented (though there was a man by that name in that period).  What I know was discovered by a member of my birth family.  The surname is distinctive enough to make them quite easy to trance through a tangle of records.

 

I like that!  You can find much more about it in the late Richard Fletcher’s wonderful book Bloodfeud, Murder and Revenge in Anglo-Saxon England.

 

What a tangle!  I have no idea if the Plantagenets were related to Macbeth, but it’s a nice idea. I did do some research into the Scottish kings and was somewhat surprised to find that Macbeth ruled a long time and was well-regarded by the church! Not such a bad guy after all, but who knows?

 

No, I had no idea that I’d be writing about Alfred, so I suspect the similarity is either coincidence or a lack of imagination on my part.

 


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I was just wondering if you intentionally married Sigtryggr into Uhtred's family as a vein to allow him to pass freely to Bebbanburg, or if it is another hidden reference to previous characters in your books, as the real Sigtryggr would have been a Grandson of the real Ivar the Boneless?

Luke

A

No, it was just a whim!


Q

Dear Bernard (I start by calling you Bernard as we have known each other for so long)

I have just completed the latest part of Uhtred's tale and despite trying to take my time find myself bereft at completing the book in a few days, in the knowledge that I will  have to wait an eternity before taking up his story again.

I know your fans will, as children waiting for Santa to come, be asking you the same question, when will the next book be published?!!!

I the whole Last Kingdom Series on my bookshelf and will be reading them again once the series has come to its inevitable conclusion, when will this black day arrive?  Do you know how many more books there will be in the series?

Thank you very much for sharing your talent of leaving your readers unable to tell the difference between historical fact and fiction.

yours with thanks

Margaret

A

I don’t know! I’ll say at least four? But truly that’s a guess.


Q

Congratulations on a new epic installment of Uhtred! Forgive me if this is published elsewhere but are you doing any book signings or appearances in or around Charleston in the near future? I'm an elementary school teacher on Hilton Head Island and I always order your books from the UK and surprise my father when he comes down to visit with an "advance" copy. Many thanks for your time; my father and I thank you for our less than average bonding over Uhtred which never fails to confound the rest of our family.

Caroline Lane


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I'm your fan!

I want ask to you if there are some plans to write about War of the Roses? You're a genius and Uhtred's Saga is the best novel that I read. I was thinking if have you never thought to write about War of the Roses by vision of a character, like Uhtred or Derfel, who will live during this age, since Henry VI until coronation of Henry VII in the battle of  Battle of Bosworth Field.

Do you have some plans to War of the Roses?

Thanks!!

Lucas

A

I don't have plans for The War of the Roses.


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At the end if your most recent book you elude to the name Uhtred being present in modern day names- albeit derivations from the original form. What names, forename or surname, do you mean by this? I find the whole idea of historical names of people and places adapting and changing over time very interesting. I've spent time looking at how names in my own family have developed and changed over the last few generations and your comment intrigued me. Thank you

Mark Ford

A

The descendants of Uhtred now spell their name Oughtred


Q

Hi Bernard,

I have very much enjoyed reading, as they have been published, the entire Last Kingdom series. The work of researching each book must have been immense. The fun then to launch Uhtred into the gaps in knowledge has created a brilliant series. So I am very much a fan.

My question is p27 of The Flame Bearer Uhtred is reminiscing about a childhood trip to Lindisfarne and recollects being shown a valuable book written in Latin. Surely this would have been a celtic Christian manuscript and written in contemporary English. I saw a year or two ago a book from the Lindsfarne gospels, which to my surprise was written in English. I was told that pre romaninised celtic Christian church operated in English. It was only after the diet of Whitby 900 ish if my memory serves me right, that the celtic church gave way to Rome and Latinised. Northumbria at this stage would have been influenced by celtic and not Roman Christianity.

I'm I right or getting confused. I await your answer with some curiosity and will continue to be intrigued and entertained by Uhtred's progress towards retaking Babbenbergh. Thanks for hours of intriguing reading.

Regards

Phil Hanson,

A

I imagine they’d have had texts in both languages . .


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I finished Flame Bearer and I'm very happy with the end, by Uhtred. One question that can look irrelevant, but, Uhtred said that give Durham to Sihtric, he became earl of Durham?

Other thing, will be some mention to any bastard son of Ragnar the younger? It's said that he and Brida hadn't sons, but he has a lot of bastards. And Uhtred's bastard? Would you have plans to mention them in a future book?

Thanks!!

Tony Smith

A

He became King of Northumbria . . isn’t that enough?

I honestly don’t know! It’s possible!


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Dear Mr Cornwell

First off I just wanted to say I am a huge fan.  Sharpe,  Starbuck, Uhtred and Arthur feel like old friends I can pick back up time after time.

I was just re-reading Harlequin and noticed a continuity error that it throws up in 1356. At the beginning of the book you describe how Thomas makes his bow in wonderful detail and also how he makes his arrows.  In 1356, the scarcity of arrows is a constant plot point and you reference how all the archers know how to make a bow but not the arrows.

Just wondering if you had noticed?

Kind regards,

Charlie Baxter

A

Thomas can make arrows, not every archer could, and certainly not in the quantity needed for a campaign. Thomas made his own arrows for hunting, not for war.

 


Q

Hello, Bernard,

Met you at Canterbury last week, had pic taken with you and my son before the 'show', which was most entertaining! I've been looking at a phenomenal book called British Monarchs by Mike Ashley. He gives all the family trees of the English royal houses, and according to Chart 32, an Earl Uhtred of Northumbria was married to Elgiva, daughter of Ethelred the Unready - they had a daughter called Edith, but no mention of sons. Is it possible that somehow, through this union, (if the chart is accurate), that you are directly descended from Alfred the Great? Of course, you may already be aware of this 'connection'!

Regards,

Mick

A

Indirectly, I was born on the wrong side of the blanket. Alfred would disapprove.


Q

Hi Bernard,

I recently came to see you give your talk at York! I absolutely loved it, meeting you was great! You mentioned in your talk that you're currently writing another book at the minute, is this the next  Uhtred book? I adore Uhtred, I just wish he was real haha. I'm pleased that you have around another 4 Uhtred books in mind.

Zoe Edwards

A

It’s not!  I’ll probably write that next year.


Q

Dear Bernard,

Thanks for your books, which have entertained and educated me enormously. I've never been on this site and I'm very impressed - how do you possibly find time to write all the replies to questions?

I'm going to sound like a smartarse, but Uhtred could not have ridden through a wood of oaks and sycamores because sycamores were not in Britain then.

All the best,

Pete

A

You’re absolutely right about the American sycamore ( a plane tree), which makes it puzzling that the word occurs in the 14th Century. A mystery! I have no answer.

 


Q

Dear Bernard,

having read almost all your books has made me an addict and I can't wait for the next book to be published. So at first: Thank you for your books!

Before you read on: YES, I have read and understood your guidelines and I herewith give up any right in any Idea or right I could possibly have.

After reading the Uhtred series I got interested in the questions of when and why the Saxons and Angles left their home in the north of Germany (since I live near to that area) and started the settlement / conquer of Britain. While reading about this I stumbled about Horsa and Hengist as Saxon tribal Leaders and the Finnburh fragment. That time lies rather nebulous with not many historic facts to be known. That on the other hand can give freedom to an author to develop a story. I thought, this could offer a good frame for a prequel of the Uhtred series.

I will not continue in order to not further interfere with your guidelines.

To make my point clear: I do not plan to sue you. I just want some new compelling stuff to read.

I would be glad, when you give a thought to the idea.

Yours sincerely,

Markus Hudalla

A

I always think of the three Arthur books as the prequel – probably the only one I’ll write! But thank you for the suggestion.


Q

Dear Mr.  Bernard Cornwell

The trouble with your books is, they are impossible to put down!  I've just read "The Flame Bearer" .....However it appears from the Epilogue that, that is not the end of the saga.  Or am I jumping to conclusions?

But, isn't it about time the American Civil War drew to a close?  It didn't take anywhere near as long as it took Alfred and his children to unite all the Saxon speaking peoples of this island under one Christian king.

Phil White

 

well just finished reading Flame Bearer ....I think there was hints of further quests for Uhtred and his family { hopefully] .love all your books keep writing and please find time to include Thomas Hookton in your thoughts

thanks

Paul

 

I have just finished reading The Flame Bearer - magical story telling and writing, thank you!  I feel somewhat bereft now, however, I notice that in your note at the back you hint that Uhtred's story may not yet be finished. Can I hope that this is not the last we will read of Uhtred?

Ann

 

Hi,

I have devoured the Flame Bearer in a day and as always I'm left breathless with admiration, it doesn't get any better than that this whole series has been amazingly great.

Two questions

Is this the end for Uhtred?

I have read that you enjoy the Shardlake series of novels, as do I, any plans for a bit of crime in your future?

Mike Davidson

 

A

Uhtred's story is not finished....


Q

Hey Bernard!

My name is Mark Wilder. I'm 22 and was wondering something about writing:

1) How long does it take you (on average) to write one of Uhtred's adventures?

2) How many drafts do you typically go through?

Thank you!

Mark

A

Most books take around 6 months to write.  Drafts?  I usually write maybe 20% of a book, then start again, get to 40% and start again, and so on.  I am constantly revising, so there aren't really distinct drafts.


Q

Hi Bernard.

I have avidly followed the story of Uhtred from the beginning and at last finally made it to visit Bamburgh/Bebbanburg. I know the fortress of your imagination may not be exactly that of the original Saxon stronghold (underneath the current buildings of course) but I was not able to fully reconcile some of your descriptions. In short, did you imagine the "Lower Gate" was located at the north of the outcrop ( where the Saxon "St.Oswald's" gate is believed to be) or on the southern section where the current main Gate is? I know you describe characters approaching the Lower Gate from the south but in my minds eye the various descriptions given of entering the Fortress best suit a northern entry.

Oh dear! I have just read that back to myself and it does sound a bit pedantic. I hope you forgive me if it does!!

I also notice you are coming to York. In an earlier comment to your website I recommended the book on Viking Age Yorkshire  by Matthew Townend. I just wondered if you ever managed to look it up.

Paul Stein

A

A northern entry? There appears to have been one at some point, but remember that in Saxon times the northern side was bordered by an inlet of the sea and the western side (where the playing fields are now) was a harbour!  The southern entry was always the main one

 

Thank you for that . . . I will look it up!


Q

I just finished Warriors of the Storm, having read all of your other books as well.

Great reads!

Your observations of Christianity are new. I recall Uhtred thinking of how the priests talk to the dead....something like that. Also, the "nailed god".

Where did these concepts come from?

David Slagle

A

Well, the concept of talking to the dead is Uhtred’s take on praying to saints. As for the nailed God – think Crucifix!

 


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Having read your books out of sequence, I knew that at some point Uhtred and Atheflaed connected as lovers even though she was just a child when they first met.  Although their bond plays a key role in several books, you seem to have downplayed intentionally the time at which they connected. (Burning Land)  I wondered why.  I'm not asking about having some major sex scene (that's not your style) but the connection is so subtle one could almost miss it. And it's never addressed in any way, just treated as if it had always been there and nothing out of the ordinary.  Yet it was a huge change and had significant consequence, and risks, for both them.

Rosemary

A

To be honest I don’t remember writing about their getting together . . . I’m sure you’re right, mea culpa then.

 


Q

Recently had the honour and privilege of a tiny involvement in the filming of "The Last Kingdom" (second series) and its going to be awesome! My question to you is, in the same way Sean Bean actually became Richard Sharpe in your mind when you wrote(Ive heard you intimate that, I'm sure), has Alex become Uhtred in the same way?

David M

A

Not to the same extent!  The factor here being that Alexander (whose portrait of Uhtred is splendid!) is young in the TV series and I'm writing a much older Uhtred.

 

 

 


Q

I want to start by saying i am a huge fan of your work and routinely check for updates. I would tell you my favorite book of yours but it is impossible to compare them, they are all great in their own way. Be it Sharpe, Uhtred, or Nathaniel, you have always been able to make a truly inspiring main character. I've found myself wanting to be them, or mirror their lifestyles. The sheer pride, strength and stubborness you instill in them is amazing. Few authors have made me read till my head hurts as many times as your books have.

I have a few questions for you. What are you favorite books? Who are a few of your favorite Authors, and which ones inspired you to write the way you did? Lastly, can you convince sean bean to change his name to richard sharpe, it seems more fitting.

Thanks for reading my letter Mr. Cornwell. Please keep writing for as long as you can. Its bad enough that there will not be more Sharpe adventures, i cant imagine a world without new Cornwell books.

 

Sincerly,

Your biggest fan, Eric.

A

I read a vast amount of history (non-fiction).  I like good mysteries and detective novels - Ian Rankin, John Sandford, PD James, Dennis Lehane.  I could go on and on and on...I'm a HUGE fan of Stuart McBride who writes Scottish noir tales - police procedurals - but with enormous wit and a very dark imagination...there are many others I enjoy as well!

 

 

 

 


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hi Bernard,

firstly, thank you so much for writing the last kingdom series.  i saw the tv series, loved it, and immediately began reading it from the beginning.  secondly, thank you for being not only an incredible story-teller, but also an extremely prolific one!  i listen to audiobooks too and am listening to sharpe's tiger and it's great.  so my question is in regards to sword song when uhtred is retaking london from siegfred (sp) and erik, and he takes the 2 ships through the gap in london bridge.  my understanding from the map is that the portion of london east of the bridge was fortified by the enemy?  or was it the west side?  it sounds like uhtred is rowing west to east towards the estuary, which would have been in the direction of the river's flow.  but then the location of ludd's gate doesn't make sense unless they were rowing against the river at high tide going east to west.  i think it must be the latter, right?  and the water level was lower west of the bridge because of high tide?  thank you for the clarification!  also, was there ever a gap or did you make that up?

 

sincerely,

Sarah

A

I’m confused too. At slack tide the bridge was passable, does that help?


Q

I absolutely love your novels.  Uhtred must be one of my favorite characters of all time.  In Death of Kings, Uhtred thinks that while he is not fond of Christianity, he is fond of many Christians.  He mentions the most important Christians in his life; Alfred, Aethelflaed, Father Beocca, etc.  I could not help but notice he fails to mention Finan.  While Finan certainly does not rise to the status of Alfred, he is Uthred's most trusted friend, warrior, and adviser.  Was this an unintentional oversight, or does Finan not hold a special place in Uhtred's circle?

Mo Wark

A

Finan is the most important man in Uhtred’s life and I don’t think Uhtred particularly thinks of him as a Christian – I mean he is, but he’s not pious.


Q

Dear Mr. Bernard Cornwell:

When is the second installment of the television series The Last Kingdom going to be shown in the United States?  I have read all of your books about Uhtred of Bebbanburg  and enjoy them very much.

Thank you for responding.

Sincerely,

Ms. Susan M. Grady

A

We don't have a date yet, but I suspect it will be in the early Spring.  In the meantime, you can get a 'behind the scenes' peek at the filming of this tv series by going to the videos on the homepage of this website.  Enjoy!


Q

Hi,

I'm in the middle of re-reading the last Uhtred novel in preparation for the next one, i'ts released 1 day after my birthday i'm so excited.

My question is, what's next? I would love another Uhtred, another Sharpe would be amazing, could it be another Starbuck? You did hint a couple of years ago about an Elizabethan story.

Also I've recently read short stories by Patrick O'Brien and CS Forrester do you have any lying around you could release?

Mike

A

I'm thinking about the next book....haven't made up my mind yet.

I do have three short story books available - Sharpe's Skirmish, Sharpe's Christmas and Sharpe's Story.

Go here for more information about the short story books:  http://www.bernardcornwell.net/series/short-stories/


Q

Could you explain where you found the phrase  Uhtred uses, and what it translates to in English. I know it is something to do with his belief in fate, which can not be changed or foreseen. I am unable to correctly type the phrase, this is the best I can do.

Wyrd biò ful ãræd.

Lorraine Dent-Magnusson

A

It comes from an Old English poem, 'The Wanderer', which is a very beautiful and rather sad, and is the thoughts of an exile wandering the earth.  It is usually translated as 'fate is relentless' but I prefer inexorable.  If you can find a copy then you'll find the quote at line 5.

 

 


Q

Morning,

First, I'd like to thank you for the truly excellent Saxon Series.  I've read all and each is just great.  I find myself connecting with the Uhtred character.  Starting over again with the series to capture more of what I first read.  Question  - you portray Alfred as very clever but totally captured by his priests and Christian doctrine.  Also, he is portrayed as not being the warrior type (thin, no interest in violence) and much afflicted by digestive system problems.  Is there real evidence of this?

Larry Gerfen

A

The evidence is from Bishop Asser’s life of Alfred which depicts him as a sickly, pious scholar, but also a man of extraordinary intelligence. I’m just assuming that a man suffering from a chronic disease (probably Crohn’s) was not also a fearsome warrior. I might be wrong, but the guess seems reasonable to me.

 


Q

Hi again, Mr. Cornwell.

I get the impression from reading the Uhtred novels that the Vikings never really made any significant inroads into Scotland, certainly not to be compared with their successes in Northumbria, East Anglia and Mercia.  Why was this?  Did they not think that the Scottish countryside was worth the effort?  Or were the Scots so tough that they mostly focused their efforts down south?

Alan Kempner

A

They made inroads where there was good arable land, but that, of course, is a scarcity in much of Scotland. They more or less took all the outlying islands, though those were used more as bases for their ships which were used for fishing and what we’d call piracy. Their real ambition was the best agricultural land that could sustain large settlements and those, as you say, were further south. But certainly they were a huge nuisance to the Scots, but eventually, as in England, married into the indigenous population and so ‘melted’ away.

 


Q

Hi, Bernard!

I've recently had the pleasure of reading some of your books. I've most recently finished The Fort and will be running out as soon as I have my next paycheck to purchase Redcoat. I was wondering if you have any plans of paying another visit to the American Revolution? There are a number of fascinating episodes that would surely benefit from your style - the siege of Quebec or the Illinois Campaign come to mind.

I've also greatly enjoyed the Uhtred of Bebbanburg series, and I'm eagerly anticipating the next installment of that series. Thanks so much for penning such wonderful stories!

Warmest Regards,

Shane Majszak

Montana

A

I'm not sure I'll revisit the American Revolution - it's possible....we'll have to wait and see!


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I have been a fan of your books since 1987 when I first found Sharpe's Eagle in a local newsagent,and you are obviously a man who loves and studies history.I have read and heard your comments about King Alfred being acclaimed The Great by common consent of historians,and how you would include Elizabeth 1 in the same category and would like to know why? A ruling monarch has three prime expectations from their subjects,to make a marriage of state for the benefit of the kingdom at large,to beget an heir, ten if possible and to defend the realm from all aggressors.I know she never married or had any children,and from what I have read it seems we would all be speaking Spanish if Drake and Raleigh didn't take it on themselves to attack the armada,please correct me about that if I am wrong because we don't learn english history in Australia.I probably sound like a smartarse,but am not trying to be, I really want to understand why the English love ER1 so much,because I just don't get it.I have read all your books and watched all the tv productions of Sharpe and Uhtred (even have a complete first edition of Sharpes series) and really want to hear your thoughts on Elizabeth. Thanks for listening and look forward to a reply,

regards

Mark

A

Well, there is no formal list of qualifications, let alone a commission, to establish that honorific. It’s a matter of opinion, and you know mine. Certainly Elizabeth failed to provide an heir, but by the same token, she managed to avoid the dynastic squabbles the would have followed, say, a marriage to the Count of Anjou, or the domestic strife if she had chosen an English husband. Besides, there was an heir! James of Scotland. If James had been Catholic then that would have been a problem, but he was a Protestant which was probably the most important factor in Elizabeth’s eyes. And, trust me, she made sure England’s defences were ready for the various Spanish assaults (there was more than one Armada, and Drake and Raleigh did not just ‘take it on themselves’ – they were part of a rebuilt English fleet). I admire her intelligence, her diplomacy, her patience, and the fact that she held England together despite the enormous religious strains imposed by the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, something that her successors were notably unable to do. As I said, there are no rules. I just like the woman!

 


Q

I cant tell you how much I have enjoyed your novels, especially about Uhtred of Bebbenburg and Thomas of Hookton! Have read all this spring and summer and on my way to the library to start the Arthur series. I had two questions but one has been answered on your site about Uhtred. Guess I will have to wait a while. Second will there be more about Thomas? Haven't gotten to the Sharpe series. Thank you for all your good work.

Richard Brown

A

I'm not planning another book for Thomas now....


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Q

I am currently enjoying Warriors of Storm and already I am extremely pleased to hear another book is soon to come. Within the book Uhtred rides out on his new tall black horse Tintrig (sorry I am guessing at the spelling as it is an audio book).  Uhtred states it means torment. Several times in previous books translations are mentioned and I was wondering what the source is for these words and meanings. In my opinion it is these small tidbits of history which make the series such a great read.  Thank you for writing so many great reads and I would like to know a little more about the languages for the name of the horse.

Kind regards,

Jay

 

A

I use an Anglo-Saxon to modern English dictionary! There are several available!


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Q

Dear Bernard

You have mentioned that Sharpe became Sean Bean in your mind when writing the character after Sean was cast in the role, as such I was wondering if the same has happened with Uhtred. When writing future books featuring Uhtred do you now picture the actor who portrays Uhtred in the TV series when writing the books? Great books.

Thanks

Phil

A

Not to the same extent!  The factor here being that Alexander (whose portrait of Uhtred is splendid!) is young in the TV series and I’m writing a much older Uhtred.

 


Q

Not sure if my last e-mail ever made it through, but would like to say how much I enjoy your historical fiction.  Though I have always been an avid reader, in the last few years I've discovered audio books, which is how I have become familiar with your writings.  I particularly enjoy your stories of Uhtred of Bebbanburg (please forgive my spelling if incorrect).  I am curious as to why Uhtred is sometimes Uhtred of Bebbanburg, while other times he is Uhtred of Bamburgh.  What is the historical significance of the two titles, and which is the more appropriate?

I am currently listening to 1356 which obviously takes place well after Uhtred's time.  Could you explain what started the 100 Year's War, and why England felt it had the right to press the war in France?  Also, why did the Gascons side with the English?

Having some English ancestry (as well as French, Russian, and Polish), I am fascinated by the many eras in English history (albeit rather violent that they may have been).  I am also perplexed by how many monarchs reigned over England, how they came to power, and in so very many cases how tragically brief their reigns were.  Given the high propensity for being either killed in battle, deposed from head of state, and/or the potential for being beheaded, why would any of them ever want the crown?   I've searched the internet to discover that England has had at least 63 monarchs (Kings, Queens, & Regents) over roughly 1500 years starting with the Saxon King Egbert.  Yet no King Arthur.  Was Arthur purely fictional?  If there was a real Arthur, where in the timeline would he have fit?  And with that in mind, have you any plans on writing about the first king of England, and what led to his crowning.  I would find that quite fascinating.

I am also very interested in the War of the Roses, as many of your readers are, and wonder if you will tackle that era someday.  Finally, since one my favorite movies is Braveheart, could you enlighten your readers more on the real life on Longshanks?  Given his long reign, could he have been as cruel and vicious as Mel Gibson had him portrayed in the movie?

David Gilbert

A

I have no idea?  It's Bebbanburg in the books so I can only assume the reader/producer of the audiobooks prefers Bamburgh?

 

The Kings of England claimed to be the rightful kings of France! Simple as that! And Gascony owed loyalty to England (feudal obligation) and feared being overrun by the French.

 

I suspect that Arthur existed, but doubt he was ever a king . . . though that’s a topic too long to deal with here. He would have been active at the beginning of the 6th Century, after the Romans have left and while the Saxon invasion of Britain is still under way. Why would anyone want the crown? Why would anyone want to be president? Or CEO? Or any position of power? Because power is an aphrodisiac and because men crave power!

 

I’m afraid I’ve never seen the movie, so can’t comment on how accurate the portrayal is. But Edward Longshanks is an alpha male in a brutal mediaeval society so I don’t suppose he was particularly meek and mild.

 

 


Q

Iceland vs. England….. Clearly Alfred would mourn the upset. But where would Uhtred's loyalties have been?

Richard Reich

 

A

Uhtred never had a fondness for the over-pampered, arrogant, spoiled and privileged. He would have taken great satisfaction from the result.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Not since Harry Potter have I been so restless in waiting for a novel to release. I have, for a long time, wanted to visit England for its history and historical places. I am traveling to England in September and have decided to follow the trails of Uhtred instead of the well worn tourist path. While I am preparing my list from the 9 books so far, can I ask for your recommendation of places one should not miss when on Uhtred's Trails?  Also can I bother you to tell me exact location you had in mind and if they still exist from my below list?

I will go to the castle of Bamburgh, Cannington Hills,  Bratton Castle. I am not sure where, if any, of the plaques / castles / monuments related to Alfred the Great, by extension of our beloved Uhtred, are present in York, Benfleet, Durham, London and Tettenhall?

Hope you could spare a few minutes and guide me in the right direction.

Regards

Dwarakesh

 

A

Bamburgh for sure! And don’t forget Winchester (Alfred’s capital), and I’d certainly visit Edington (Ethandun) in Wiltshire. Durham (Dunholm), of course, is well worth a visit. But many of the places have changed beyond all recognition – Benfleet has its charms, but it’s almost impossible to trace the Saxon past thanks to urban sprawl. Wareham, in Dorset, has the only remaining Saxon ramparts in England - to be honest they’re not much to look at, but Wareham itself is a charming town and well worth a visit! York still has its mediaeval walls and, of course, a fine museum about the Viking occupation. Chester is also splendid, though again there’s little remaining of the Saxon town. That will take you to every corner of the kingdom!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I am new 2 your books me Dad put me on to you. But your novels r the best things iv ever read!!! I love Uthred and was wondering if when his saga is complete there's one in a similar style with Harold Godwinson in the role over Alfred about the lead up and aftermath og the 1066 invasion. You are the ONLY Man who could do that fact based fiction story and I would love to read your story of that period. I understand your legal bit but if I could id pay you to write it 4real! !!!. Anyways ur the best author on earth far as I'm concerned. Thank you for so many hours with with Uhtred ,Thomas of Hooton, Derfel Nick Hook and of course Sharpe. Keep on writing and again Thank You u should b Knighted or something.

Danny Bruce

A

Thank you!  Not sure I'll get to Godwinson....


Q

Just FYI: the July/August 2016 issue of Archaeology Magazine had an article on the ongoing excavations at Bamburgh, aka Bebbanburgh, aka Subject title above. I'm sure you've been there, so you probably know more about it than the article. It did mention a Viking sacking in 993, will that be part of the Uhtred saga?

Peter Hansen

A

Uhtred won’t live that long, sorry!


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell,

I just wanted to let you know, as I am sure many thousands have before me, that you are a terrific author and have provided me with many hours of true enjoyment and education.  Your ability to write is truly amazing and a gift and I hope and pray that you have many more books in the future.

Just for giggles, who is your favorite character of those you've invented?  I'm very partial to Sharpe with Uhtred a close second, Derfel third and your bowman, Thomas of Hookton fourth.

Thanks again for doing what you do!

Jeff

A

I have many favourites!  Sharpe, Uhted, Derfel and Ceinwyn from the Arthurian trilogy.  Aethelflaed, and Lady Grace from Sharpe's Trafalgar, and, of course, the wondrous Obadiah Hakeswill.

 

 

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell ,

I would just like to start by saying "thank you" for igniting my passion of reading again, it has been quite a while.

The tales of Uhtred & his mate Finan have truly been enjoyable...  what started as buying your book 'The Last Kingdom' with a voucher that work had given me at Yule last year has me waiting now for my order from Book Depository of Warrior Chronicles as I wait for you to add the finishing touches & a prowl to 'Flame Bearer'

I would have to say that my three favourite Uhtred moments are, on the shores of the Humber river I believe it was where Steapa freed him & Finan from slavery,  the time Finan gave Uhtred the upper hand hugely by walking out of Bebbanburg's smithy with Uhtred's Uncle, his cousins wife & their son!  and the time Stiorra killed the priest

Anyway back to Subject matter, I really liked how you weaved in Uhtred Jnr & his old man meeting in that Pub... I thought it was really clever how you did that & I was wondering if you ever thought about doing that with Stiorra & her husband, Uhtred is getting older now & I just don't see that it will be him that brushes shoulders with King Dunmail in a shield wall.

Keep up the good work & thanks again from Seaford, Australia

Kindest regards,

Scott

 

A

Thank you – I’ll do my best to surprise you again!


Q

Oh my Mr Cornwell

just what have you done? Not since i was in a school environment have i read a book but now i find myself reading one of yours per week. I am forced to admit that i am entirely hooked as i follow Uhtred around our wonderful land. I am fortunate to have visited and lived in so many of the areas mentioned and somehow this extends the enjoyment as my imagination links in to the knowledge of such places. My question to you is this, I find your index of old and new place names so helpful and have been using your maps additionally as we work around the  Country. Would it be at all possible to add a pronunciation guide in a third column? I struggle so much with not only the place names but some of the characters names also. I thank you for your time and even more i thank you for starting a blaze for reading that would rival any hall burning!

Kindest regards

Simon

A

We’ll think about it . . . .


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Q

Mr Cornwell,

In The Pale Horseman, a British priest mentions the Sillans to Uhtred. I can find no reference to these islands anywhere. Were these islands mythical or real? If they are real, what are they called now?

Thank you for taking time out to answer this question.

Darryl Mears

A

The Isles of Scilly, off the coast of Cornwall . . . worth visiting!


Q

Have you considered writing about Derfel's life after Excalibur?

Big fan love Uhtred and Derfel.

Andrew Davidson

A

No, I have no plans to add to Derfel's story.


Q

Dear Sir,

I have recently come to your Last Kingdom series after first watching it on TV. I have now finished book 7 and have just obtained the Kindle versions of books 8 and 9. I noticed a pre-order for book 10 and wondered whether this will be the last in the series? Uhtred is getting older and deserves some rest, though I have had great pleasure (and more to come) from reading of his exploits. I also love the way you tie in the novel to actual historical events which, although enhanced with fictional detail, greatly adds to the overall enjoyment. I will certainly be exploring other of your books. What a fantastic read!

Alan Wilson

A

It is NOT the last book!


Q

I was watching an online auction of coins recently when an item caught my attention:

Description: 1136-1145 AD. BMC type i. Obv: profile bust with sceptre with +STE[ ] legend. Rev: cross moline and fleurs with [+V]H[TR]ED:ON:EOF[ ] legend for the moneyer Uhtred at York mint. Found Kent, UK

So could it be that even after the Norman invasion Uhtred's descendants kept the name and had the status of being in charge of the mint at York?

Below is a link to the coin which I thought might interest you

http://www.invaluable.com/catalog/viewLot.cfm?lotRef=CC84FF9937

I am so pleased that there will be another chapter to Uhtred's story and can't wait for  the next book to be published.

Thank you

Ann

 

A

Thank you for that! I didn’t know of it, but it doesn’t surprise me . . . when the family lost Bebbanburg (through treachery) in 1016 they moved to Yorkshire, where a branch still lives. They became county gentry – one fought at Crecy, another was a royal chaplain and is buried in the Minster, so it’s altogether likely that a 12th Century Uhtred was master of the mint in York.

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

I know I run the risk of being a gushing sycophant, but I love your Last Kingdom series.

I come from the Wirral and so especially look out for Chester , the Dee and the Mersey.

Your description of the weather (good or bad) is so atmospheric do you come to England to get a refresher course in what it's really like or is it done from memory?

The same question really about the long boats; have you been out on one or is this from your imagination?

I went to Roskilde in Denmark where they make amazing replicas (and have a fabulous museum) I had a go at rowing which was back breaking; an odd technique where they suggest you almost throw yourself backwards. You clearly share Uhtred's love of the sea.

Looking forward to your next book.

Many thanks

Shelagh

PS Could I try and twist your arm  to write about the Godwinson clan, providing you change the course of history and the 'right' side wins at Hastings.

A

I do take a refresher course in  English weather a couple of times a year . . . and yes, years ago (too long to contemplate) I was handling an oar on a replica Viking longship – on the River Blackwater in Essex. And you’rte right – Roskilde is wonderful! These days I prefer something much more comfortable – a cruising yacht, with engine!

You can try, but I doubt it will ever happen, sorry!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

i have just about finished the last of the series.  will there be anymore books following Warriors of the Storm?

I have enjoyed these books very much.

Eric Anderson

 

When will the next book be out please?  Can't wait.

Sheila Weston

 

Will there be a book 10? I very much hope so I love this series.

Thank you

Colleen

 

Just completed Warriors of the Storm and Uhtred has not reclaimed Bebbanburg yet.Can I look forward to future novels that will give me the rest of Uhtred's story? Can you tell me possibly when?  I have enjoyed all nine.

Michelle Johnson

 

Sir,

First of all, and I'll keep it short, thank you so much for your work. Your writing has provided me with entertainment, inspiration and joy that I would not trade for anything. I thought nothing could beat Hornblower until I picked up Sharpe! Many years of good health to you sir!

As for my question: I see you mention "The Flame Bearer" in a previous question, and can find no reference to this phrase anywhere else. Is this the title of Book 10? In any case I can't wait for it! I am always making excuses not to read your new books; I finish them so fast, I hate not having any more to look forward to!

Neil

A

The next book will be called The Flame Bearer and will be published in the UK in October and in the US in November.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I'm a very picky reader and I've only recently discovered your books. I'm up to date on Uhtred, and just finished Sharpe's Trafalger. Needless to say, I'm hooked. You're singlehandedly responsible for hours of my reading pleasure and Wikipedia binges.

Are there any other topics you'd enjoy writing about? On this Memorial Day Weekend in Massachusetts, the courage and perseverance of the vacationer in Cape Cod traffic seems fitting, as does the resolve of the Cape Cod local preparing for the annual invasion.

Jon in Massachusetts

A

There are many topics!  I hope to live long enough to write many of them - but Cape Cod traffic is definitely NOT on the list!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

While reading the warrior chronicles I've noticed how sometimes Uhtred reminds me of Derfel, the Arthur's warrior whose best years were behind him and could do nothing but remember the times when he charged shield walls. I found this interesting, specially because (and this is merely a reader's opinion, which is worth next to nothing) I wouldn't think of you as that kind of person but also because Sharpe was much more fortunate, rather spending the rest of his life with his french lover. Was there something in their stories that made Sharpe worthy of it, or am I over thinking it?

 

A second question: the nordic polytheism is generally described as mostly tolerant and its society more open and equal. It has been referred that polytheist religious tended to be less prone to radicalism and more acceptive, but I would like to know if we know for a fact the Dane society really was much more tolerant and developed in a "social" sense than the christian, or we simply have it exaggerated in the books in order to grow fond of the character who is telling the tale (I've noticed some people like to dwell into your relation with religion in your books but I assure you that is not my intention: my question has only to do with it being a writing artifice or not).

Thank you for your time, keep up the good work!

Joao

Surrey, England

A

Uhtred hasn’t reached the end! Not yet! Sharpe’s story was curtailed by history, and Uhtred’s really isn’t. I plan to take the series as far as the Battle of Brunanburh, but in truth the wars went on long after that. Still, I suspect it won’t be all blood and slaughter for Uhtred!

 

There’s a good deal of evidence that polytheistic societies tend to be more tolerant of others’ religions than monotheistic societies, but I’m not sure that really applies to the Norse religion. Yes, they were polytheistic, but their gods all belonged in the same pantheon. It certainly seems true that in societies which hosted numerous religions that folk learned tolerance, until along came a strident sect which insisted that their one god was the only one. That’s when tempers get lost and people start stoking fires. On the whole the Norse religions were fatalistic rather than prescriptive; they don’t tell people how to behave, or define sins. They also didn’t offer eternal life to everyone, which was a clever selling point for Christianity. You might say, being kind, that Christianity was pro-active. You don’t read of missionaries spreading the gospel of Thor. In the end, as we’re learning to our cost now, a religion which claims to have a monopoly of the truth and demonizes all who disagree with it, is a dangerous, murderous and unhappy phenomenon.


Q

Hi Bernard,

Many years ago I had the pleasure of meeting you at a talk by yourself about your latest book at the time Sharpe's Prey. this was in Gloucester.

Having consumed all of the Warrior Chronicles i wonder whether this was where Gloucester first featured in your thoughts and did it create the spark for Uhtred.

I look forward to the launch of the next chapter in October.

I also cherish my Autographed copy of Prey graciously dedicated to myself.

Thank You

Mike

A

I’m afraid not! The spark for Uhtred came from meeting my natural father, something I didn’t achieve until I was in my 50’s. I then discovered that his surname was Oughtred and that the family was descended from, guess who? But I did enjoy Gloucester! Thank you

 

 


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I saw that you was a Edmund Burke admirer, and you are a specialist in middle age and anglo saxon period. Do you already had curiosity to search about ancient families, in your searches to write? Do you discovery something about Burke Family? I'm your fan since ever, Love The Last Kingdom Series, Sharpes's Series and Arthurian Novel. I asked that because my surname is Burke and I know that is a ancient Surname, but I don't know nothing about that. They had Anglo-Saxon origin?

I'm anxious to next Uhtred's Book!

Thanks by attention!

More one time, I'm your fan and love your stories

Lucas Burke

A

Edmund Burke was Irish, but it seems (my only source is Wikipedia) that the family was descended from one of the Normans who settled in Ireland – the name being de Burgh. So no, not Anglo Saxon!

 


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I'm Fan of Saxon Stories!

And I thought in a theory. In some questions you answer that Uhtred has a lot of bastards, and in other was asked if one of them would appear and you said that probably. Well, reading The Empty Throne and Warriors of Storms, I thought: There are some possibility of Berg be Uhtred's Bastard son? I know that it can look ridiculous, but I was thinking in all of these, and in Empty Throne he saying that Berg remember Uhtred (his legitimate son), and in others opportunities the own Uhtred said that wanting trick the enemies.

Well, there are some possibility about this crazy theory?

Your Fan, Lucas

A

Not Berg! His family connections (which have been very lightly sketched) will prove crucial in a future book. But yes, there is a strong possibilities with others!

 


Q

Dear Sir,

I am reading your Saxon Warrior series for the 3rd time and have noticed a discrepancy in how England is used.  The first several books it is England but subsequent books it is Englaland.  Was there a reason for the change?

Also on page 287 of the The Last Kingdom in Uhtred's fight with Ubba, it states Ubba's "left food slid sideways."

Thank you though for all the great novels.  I have enjoyed them immensely.

Good day.

Ange

A

Carelessness, probably.

That typo was caught, but unfortunately not in time!


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell,

I've decided to re-read the Saxon Tales of Uhtred, and am looking forward to the next instalment of his adventures. I am curious to know if you intend to continue the tale up to the reign of Cnut the Great? Or perhaps up to the Norman Invasion of England in 1066? Cheers,

Michael

A

Uhtred's tale will continue....how far?  We'll have to wait and see!


Q

Hi I enjoyed your series of books thank you. Is there a further book after book 9 which tells the ongoing story of his return to his home and reclaiming his birthright?

Peter James

 

Can you please let me know how soon a follow up to Warriors of the Storm may  be published? As a 90 year old English man I realise my time may be limited, and as I have a full up to date list of your 'Lord Uhtred books  I am keen to see what may be the final conclusion to this saga. (and thank you for the pleasure I have gained from your pen.

Tom Brady

 

I am just buying THE EMPTY THRONE and WARRIORS OF THE STORM, (having read the other 7 books). Does the series end here or will there be a book 10 ?

Many thanks for any info.

Thought the TV series covering the first two books was brilliant!

I hope the next books in the series will be filmed too.

Best Regards

Philip Mudd

 

When do you expect to release book 10 in the series?  I look forward to Uhtred reclaiming Bebbananburg.

I've been a fan of your for years and have enjoyed THE SHARPE SERIES,  THE STARBUCK CHRONICLES and The Fort.

Dick Davison

 

I have just seen on Amazon that this book will be published in UK on 6 Oct.  Have you any idea what title has been chosen for it?

David Coote

A

Book 10 of The Last Kingdom series will be called The Flame Bearer.  It will be published in the UK in October and in the US in November.  Hope to have an excerpt of the book on this website soon!


Q

Is there a sequel planned for Scoundrel? Enjoyed that book along with the Uhtred Series. Thank you for so many hours of reading pleasure

Tim Gunning

A

I am not planning a sequel, but I'm glad to know you enjoyed the book!


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Q

When is Lord Uhtred going to be the King of Babbanburg?  I've read the first four books already, but he's still not there yet.

Love your style of writing as evidenced in Lord Uhtred.   You can consider me one of your loyal readers as well.  You, Wilbur Smith, Jeffrey Archer, and now Ben Kane are my favorite British authors as I learned so much from the historical based novels you and your colleagues written.   Hope you keep yourself healthy and have a long life on Cape Cod.  Thank you so much, Sir.

Web Peboontom

A

Hope you'll keep reading!


Q

Hello Sir,

I'm  a big fan of The Last Kingdom.  My wife calls your books my crack cocaine as I am an addict,  currently in withdrawal waiting for book 10! So, over the course of reading the series and various shield wall encounters I wondered  whether a variation of Hannibal's Cannae tactics would work for Uhtred in one of his tight spots against a superior force given his fascination for the Romans and how such a mighty empire could fall? I am thinking that as the two walls meet if the middle block deliberately fell back to give the appearance of a break and creating a gap to draw the attackers into. Once drawn in the attackers could be surrounded on 3 flanks and decimated.  It would take some practice and coordination to execute and perhaps placement of the stronger fighters in the flanking areas instead of the front row and might only work once! Perhaps useful against the swine head when the enemy are expected to penetrate - let them over penetrate and flank them? Anyway one for Uhtred to keep up his sleeve and please for the sake of my wife, daughter and cat, keep cooking up the regular doses of Uhtred for me :-)

Thanks & best regards,

Al

A

Your battle tactics have been passed on to Uhtred. He points out that for the tactic to work his shield wall has to be longer than the enemy’s, so why not just wrap round them without the centre falling back? He faces a similar situation in The Flame Bearer, only he’s the one to be outflanked, so he chooses to do something else.


Q

Hello Bernard,

As someone who has read all your books except Stonehedge and the nautical thrillers, I want to thank you for all these hours of joy you have given me. Please please please take a small break from Uhtred (who is amazing) to complete the Starbuck Chronicles. It's been 20 years now and I think he deserves a proper ending with another book (or better let's make them two!!)

I also have a question for you: Have you thought or researched about a book/series taking place during the campaigns of Marlborough (Ramilies,Blenheim. Malplaquet,Oudenarde) or during the French and Indian Wars? I think that these are rather neglected periods and you could work miracles with them (oh come on you are not that old to start a new series!!) Thank again for all the hours your books kept me company

Nick

 

A

I’ve thought about it. Will it happen? Not in the immediate future, but one day? Maybe?


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Q

Did the vikings, and others, use chain mail in the late 800 years? I have always thought that was 100-200 years later.

Being a norwegian, i love to read about Uhtred. Have just finished Swordsong.

Arthur Antonsen

A

Oh, it was in use much earlier! The Romans fought Gauls who wore chain-mail. It was very common by the 8th Century!

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I picked up "The Last Kingdom" while I was out on a date with my wife. Within moments of opening the book I became enthralled with Uhtred's journey. I am very impressed at how quickly you have been able to turn out the Saxon Series. My wife and I are always waiting for the next book as we finish each one in 1-3 days. The Saxon Series has inspired me to delve deeper into British/Scandinavian history and myths, which I have found to be very rewarding.

I am a current college student at the University of Guam, and I am writing a paper to encourage the inclusion of the Saxon Series in our literature program. The series includes an immense amount of historical facts, and may make history more palatable for those who do not usually enjoy reading actual historical accounts. What are your thoughts about the Saxon Series possibly being included in a course on British literature? I would also like to ask, as a fan and not a student, which book/series you enjoyed working most on, and if there are other works, which you found to be intriguing and would recommend.

Thank you for your time,

Aaron Pier

A

I’m always slightly leery of the word literature. Maybe as extra-reading in a course of British history? Probably the series I enjoyed writing the most was the Arthurian . . . The Winter King, Enemy of God and Excalibur , , , but I can honestly say I’ve enjoyed working on all of them!

 


Q

I have greedily devoured all the books up to 9.  At the end of this book Amazon informs me on my Kindle that there is indeed a 10th book.   It seems to also tell me that it is untitled!?!?!?  Uhtred is going north to Bebbanburg now to settle his own affairs.  I wonder are you writing this edition or is Amazon having a laugh at my expense?  Thanks for your marvellous books, I love them and they enrich my life.

SL

A

I don't think Amazon would do that!  I'm just about finished with book 10 - still untitled but we hope to decide the title soon.


Q

I just finished Warriors of the Storm and your entire Saxon series in 2 weeks. I even had 2 of your books on a wait list at my local library - however, I couldn't wait and purchased them at Amazon. I hope the next Uhtred book is currently in the works so I can read more of his hilarious insults toward the Christian priests and see him finally take back Bebbanburg.

One question: with all of the sexual activity in which the Uhtreds partake are there any encounters with, or fear of, infectious diseases? Just askin.

Thanks for sharing these great stories!

mj

A

Life in the 9th and 10th centuries was a constant flirtation with infectious diseases! And yes, of course there was a risk of sexually transmitted disease, but would that stop you? Just sayin’.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

Thank you for all your wonderful books, I've long been a fan of Sharpe and started reading through your 'Last Kingdom' books following the television series. So far I have reached 'Death of Kings'. I mention this in case my very minor question touches upon a sub-plot that may yet be developed. But when Uhtred first goes to London he sees a Roman carving of a lion and is mystified by it. Later, in 'Death of Kings' he is perplexed by Eohric's lion banner and on a number of occasions reveals ignorance of what a lion might be. I just wonder why this should be. Uhtred is literate. He is clearly familiar with the Christian Scriptures (where lions appear not infrequently) and has no apparent trouble with other beasts either real or imaginary. Surely a reasonably well educated lord like him with wide experience would be familiar with the idea of a lion?

Not a criticism, just a query and asked with my thanks for your great books.

David Steers

A

Yes, he knows the word, but he hasn’t seen one! It’s like the dragon, the word is common in his time, but he’s still waiting to glimpse one. We know what a unicorn or a phoenix look like because we’ve seen dozens of artists’ impressions, but poor Uhtred didn’t have that advantage. He knew a lion was formidable, but how big was it? Did it have scales? A forked tail? He had no idea.

 


Q

Having found these books and for some reason as a woman find Uhtred just fascinating.

Can you say why you think so many ladies have fallen for this particular warrior?

I see that you say new book due in October. Thank you.

But will it be the last or maybe one or two more to come.?

Amazing series.

Enjoyed Waterloo as well.

Thanks for making books  and reading enjoyable again

Gwyneth Penny

A

I like to think it’s because he, in turn, likes women! He likes them strong, decisive and a few other things too! Plainly it was a period of alpha-male dominance, and there probably wasn’t a huge amount of chivalry around. I find the idea of chivalry fascinating . . . I suspect that the troubadors (who are, of course, much later than Uhtred) sang and wrote for a female audience who encouraged them because their songs (think of Chretien de Troyes and all his poems of Arthur) offered men a new role model – that of the courteous, as against the unthinking brute, warrior. Uhtred is a brute, of course, but a good woman can make him go weak at the knees!

There will be more to Uhtred's story.


Q

Recently finished Warriors of the Storm.  Enjoy the series immensely.  When will the next installment come out?  Thank you.

Gary Rigatti

 

Dear Bernard,

Are you going to write the 10th book?  When will #10 be published? I had foot surgery (a tendon graft for a torn tendon) and have read all 9 books while laid up.  Thoroughly enjoyed them and just wanted to see when and if number 10 was coming, so I could finish the story!

Best,

Howard

 

I have all of the Saxon Tales and look forward to #10, Uhtred's quest to reclaim Bebbanburgh, (Bamberg). Any hint when this will happen? I've enjoyed all of your books, but haven't got hooked on Starbuck or the Sharpe series as yet. Really anxious to acquire a copy of the new release non-fiction 'Waterloo'. My heritage is English, Scot and Welsh, so that history is very important to me. Thank you for your time and look forward to your reply!

Wm. L. Faremr

 

When will the 10th Saxon tale be published?  Just finished Warriors of the Storm (and have read all the others) and can't wait until Bebbanburg is restored to Uhtred.

James Den Boer

 

 

A

The tenth book of The Last Kingdom series will be published in the UK on 6 October 2016 and in the US on 29 November 2016.


Q

Hi,

I'm hoping you might be able to help. As a fan of your Uhtred and Arthur novels I have developed an interest in the old British and Anglo-Saxon languages. I understand that the oldest language in Britain, that we are aware of, is Common Brittonic, from which the more modern Celtic languages were developed. I am looking to translate some modern English into Common Brittonic, but I cannot find any translation services or help. Could you possibly give me some ideas about who to approach or where to look?

Stuart Anderson

A

I’m sorry, I don’t have a clue! I can struggle through Old English (Anglo-Saxon) and can just about manage Latin with the help of a dictionary and grammar, but my Welsh, and all the related languages, are Greek to me. I’m sure there must be a beginner’s guide to the Brythonic languages, but I don’t know of it. Sorry.


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Uhtred often crosses paths with old flames in later books. His path has never crossed his first wife's again. I was wondering why not. and if they ever would cross again.

John

A

I think the only first wife whose path he could cross is Mildred, and she’s immured in a convent. He doesn’t hang about much in convents.

 


Q

Nearly finished the last book - warriors of the storm- of your 9 book series, so sad that this is the finale, and I'm not looking forward to the last chapter. Just one observation. Throughout the 9 books you describe the pre Saxon people as the ancient ones, you never call them the Celts, is there a reason for that? I will miss Lord Uhtred.

Terry Irwin

A

They weren’t known as Celts in the 9th and 10th centuries, that’s why!

And I am almost finished writing the tenth book of the series so you won't have to miss him for too long!


Q

Thanks for a truly enjoyable, can't put down, series, which has kept me reading into the early hours.  Just about to begin your ninth book, Warriors of the Storm, and so glad Uhtred (senior) is still alive because I'm in love with him, even though he's much too young for me. Please tell m e you are working on the tenth book and when it should be published??

Pauline from Devon

 

Dear Mr Cornwell,

My father and I both enjoy the Uhtred books immensely and I look forward to your next book with anticipation. My question is: Do you have a title for the new book yet or do you decide that nearer the time?

Kind Regards

Stuart

 

I think you're a brilliant writer, I've only recently discovered your books and I'm now firmly addicted, consuming every one I can find. I can't wait to hear what happens to Uhtred after reading the last of the Warrior Chronicles. Do know when that will be available?

With regards and admiration

Ian.

A

I like The Flamebearer for a title but it may be a bit too early to know if that will stick!  The book will be published in the UK in early October and in the US in late November.


Q

Please can you tell me when to expect #10 in the saxon stories l.  I have just finished #9, I can't live without Uhtred and Finan! Thanks!

Lu

 

The last tantalizing bit in Warriors of the Storm says," I had business in the north". I am looking forward to what I suspect is Uhtreds' last quest as he is long in the tooth as you said. Any dates?

Jerry MIthen

 

When is book 10 due out?

Thx. Great stories

Regards

Bruno

 

Bernard

I love the way you mix history with fiction in these books and I live in Somerset and was surprised how much of the books were set in this area My question, when is the next last kingdom book planned?

Regards

Martyn James

 

I have just finished reading all of your fictional books and have very much enjoyed each of them. However, I would like to know if you plan one more and possibly final book to The Last Kingdom series in which Uhtred regains his rightful claim to Beddanburg, or perhaps meets his demise when he attempts to do so?

Bill Kran

 

Hi,

Could you tell me when the 10th book in the series will be released.

Kind regards

Iain

 

Mr. Cornwell:

First, GREAT series of books with Uhtred (whatever name the series is given). This is the first series of books I have read entirely on the Kindle. I do miss the separate solidity of a print book, and regret not being able to line them up on my shelf next to the Sharpe books. I got the print version of Waterloo, and it too was fantastic.

Second, why, why, why does your publisher release each new Uhtred book just AFTER Christmas?  That is a terrible marketing idea, especially when the release in UK BEFORE Christmas is so heavily marketed on the social media which knows no geographic boundaries.  Very frustrating.

Third, I'm a lawyer.  Don't stop reading, haha. But seriously, we are not all bad.  And, lawyers don't go looking for copyright issues.  Blame the author who thinks he's been violated, not the lawyer who guides him through the legal process.

Cheers!

Mike Roundy

A

The good news is the tenth book of The Last Kingdom series will be published in the US before Christmas this year!  Still no title yet, but the book is available for pre-order on both Amazon.co.uk (publication date is 6 October 2016) -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Books-Cornwell-Untitled-Uhtred-Book-Kingdom/dp/0007504217/ref=sr_1_13_twi_har_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1459191191&sr=1-13&keywords=bernard+cornwell

and Amazon.com (publication date 29 November 2016) -

http://www.amazon.com/Unti-Cornwell-Saxon-Tale-10/dp/0062250787


Q

Finished Warriors and understand Uhtred is continuing to recall his adventures from the perspective of old age. Is he doing so in Bebbanburg as the Lord of Bebbanburg?

Mike O'Connell

A

Keep reading....


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell,

I know that the Arthur Trilogy is complete, and the Saxon Stories will have another few books in it (my guess is 2-3? Feel free to address that if you wish); but my question for you is - how many more Grail Quest (or rather, Hookton) book will there be? I haven't read any of the Grail Quest, so I'm not sure if "1356" is the final one in that regard.

Keep up the great work - I look forward to the future (and final?) adventures of Uhtred, and reading about Thomas Hookton and the Grail Quest.

All the best,

~ Jeffrey

A

I don't plan to add to the Grail Quest series - that series is done!  And I don't have any future plans for Thomas of Hookton at this time.


Q

Dear Bernard,

LOVE your Uhtred books! In the Warriors of the Storm, the sub-story of Bishop Leofstan and his wife, Gomer, and her lifestyle, are quite analogous to the marriage relationship described in the Old Testament Book of Hosea. This was also a dark time in biblical history, Hosea’s wife was also named Gomer, she was also a whore, and Hosea also loved her nevertheless.Two queries: (1) was the parallel to Hosea’s marriage a coincidence?, and (2) can you write any faster? I LOVE your Uhtred books!

Phil Eisenhaur

A

It was deliberate and I think I say that in the Historical note!


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Q

Dear Bernard,

I very much enjoy reading Uhtred's story and your description about the adventurous way the various kingdoms will join and become "England". And I very much appreciate the historical notes at the end of each book!

Do you think it might be possible that someone - with your help - will write an "Uhtred Companion" with more historical background, maps and information about the daily life on farms and in cities? Something like the "Hornblower Companion" (Forester) or "Harbors and High Seas" (Patrick O'Brian) with a touch of "The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England" (Ian Mortimer)?

Best regards

Chris

A

I suppose it’s possible, but I’m not in any haste to suggest it. The Sharpe Companion was suggested to us, and turned out really well. Who knows? Perhaps someone would like to do it!

 


Q

Hi

I have been a keen reader of the Saxon stories since the first one. Whilst waiting for the next installment I happened to read some original stories of Conan the Barbarian. I wondered if this character influenced the creation of Uhtred in any way?

Certainly they have some similarities such as uncanny warriors instinct, battle-joy, a way with the ladies (so to speak) and a funny way of inadvertently achieving good while pursuing their own ends. They both have similar attitudes to the supernatural, though in Conan's world the supernatural is real (not that this really adds anything for me).

Of course Uhtred is a far more authentic, realistic and complex character, woven into factual and relevant history, and is much more satisfying for it.

If you haven't read any of the Conan stories, they are easy reading and perhaps you'd enjoy them.

Paul Vincent

 

A

I haven’t read them, perhaps I should. I do like Cohen the Barbarian, though, who was dreamed up by the late (and much missed) Terry Pratchett.


Q

Mr. Cornwell.

I have read your books now for many years.  "The Sharpe Tales" have accompanied me on my travels and I have spent much time in a comfortable chair appreciating the rigors that Uhtred endures.  I have even spent many wonderful miles with Arthur and Derfel -- in what I consider to be your masterpiece, "The Warlord Trilogy" -- on my long training runs (audio books).  Thank you for the pleasure that you have given to me through your art.

I have read that you do not know what your novel will contain until you write it.  Despite this, have you maintained a general outline of the story that you have developed in "The Saxon Tales"?  That is, when you first conceived of the idea for the series, did you plot out the structure of the story into the future?  If so, did you run this outline through to the end?

 

Thank you.

A

No.  I don't have an outline.  Some writers plot very carefully, and their books are great, but others, like me, leave it to instinct.


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

you receive a lot questions when /if a new Sharp/Uhtred/Hookton/Starbuck book will be written. This made me wonder if you are worried that you might not be able to tell their tales until a (satisfying) end? Or is this something which isn't bothering you at all (i.e. with Starbuck)?

Nevertheless I wish you at least another healthy 30 years to tell the story of Uhtred's Grandson!!

Best wishes

Markus

A

I wish myself the same! I do want to finish Uhtred’s tale, and I’d like to go back to Sharpe at least one more time. Poor Starbuck! Don’t know about him. And I do have another series in mind (oh no!)

 


Q

hello Mr Cornwell,

we live in the northeast of England and are familiar with Bamburgh castle, will Witnere or another warhorse feature as the "beast of Bebbanburg" in an upcoming episode of Uhtred's story?

Ron Bryden

A

I don’t know! I never know what’s in a book till I write it, but I’ll do my best!

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

About how old would Uhtred be in Warriors of the Storm? Uhtred is my hero, thanks for keeping him alive.

I am amazed at how many women love these books especially with so much blood and gore.  Yours are the only books like this that I have enjoyed.

Great entertainment.

Becky

A

He’s in his 50’s . . .which is ancient in the 10th Century! If I remember rightly he was born in 857 AD, so he’s still not an old age pensioner.

 


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Q

I recently read through all of the Uhtred books in a row, and noticed some of his sworn men drop out over the years. I know some of died in books(Clapa, Rypere) but others like Cerdic just disappear. Are these characters still alive and just not needed for plot or did they die between novels? I have one more related question, is the Rollo who serves Rangar in The Burning Land the same Rollo who serves Uhtred in later books?

Dan Anderson

A

Cerdic is back in the book I’m writing now. They do tend to fade away, my fault. And no, they’re two different Rollos


Q

I have really enjoyed reading all nine books published so far. I have two questions for you please:-

1. What is the timescale for the next book?

2. Do you know if the BBC plan to produce a further series of Uhtred's story.

Thank you

Ken Leadbetter

A

I hope the next book (no title yet!) will be ready for publication (UK) in September or October.

Yes!  There will be a season 2 of The Last Kingdom tv series.


Q

Dear Bernard,

I have just completed the Last Kingdom series and have enjoyed them a great deal.  I have been used to reading literature based on the Plantagenet period, as I always found the most interesting.  However, you have opened my eyes to our heritage in these great isles, which is sadly not mentioned, covered or remembered as much.

So thank you again for opening my eyes to this part of our history.

My question to you is, would an army led by your Uhtred, with Finan at his side, defeat William the Bastard of Normandy in 1066.

Out of curiosity, was his descendants there that fateful day?

What would his reaction to his country being finally conquered for good by descendants of Norse raiders.

Anthony Baldock

A

I honestly have no idea! I imagine his descendants (who, by then, had settled in Yorkshire) were not happy at all, but they held onto most of their land.


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I read this in one of your recent interviews...."I’m sort of writing up Athelstan in more recent books. I’m not sure whether I will change to his voice, whether I’ll use Uhtred sans voice, whether I’ll keep Uhtred’s voice."

I greatly enjoyed reading the opening of "Warriors of the Storm" , in which we get an insight to young Uhtred's point of view. I have become quite a fan of young Uhtred - he's different from his father, but a brave warrior nevertheless.

Have you ever considered continuing the story from his perspective? Thanks, looking forward to reading more of your stories.

Andreas

A

I consider it daily! Still haven’t made up my mind though . . . .

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

By chance I happened to read your first book of the Last Kingdom Series around eighteen months ago and since then I have been obsessed in accompanying Uhtred on all of his journeys up until Warriors of The Storm. In all of these novels Uhtred recaps his life from middle to old age where you hint he has returned to his child roots in Bebbanburg. Are you writing a follow up novel where Uhtred reclaims his heritage, and if so when do you expect it to be released? I, like many other of your readers are waiting with baited breath for Uhtred's next step in reclaiming his heritage.

An unashamed Uhtred admirer.

Yours Sincerely

Ron Harwood

 

Another great book.  Sadly, hard to put down, thus finished it too quick.  Any target date for another book about our friend Lord Uhtred?

Ken Stafford

 

Great book again, really love authored, type of guy for the time. Hope not long to wait for the next one?

Brian Armer

A

I am writing the next book now - hopefully we'll see it published (in the UK) in September.


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwall,

You mention you are a descendant of Uhtred of Bamburgh – albeit the time frame of the real Uhtred is not that of the character in your wonderful book series.  In my ancestry I have an Uhtred, Earl of Northumbria (?-1016), wife Ecgfrida, parents of Ealdred of Bamburgh & Bernicia; Uhtred’s father one Waltheof I, Ealdorman of Bamburgh.  Is this the same Uhtred as your ancestor?

With very best wishes

Sarah

A

It isn’t the same Uhtred, but yours is descended from mine (if that makes sense). I assume you’ve read Bloodfeud by Richard Fletcher – it’s all about your (our) ancestor!

 


Q

Hello Bernard

I just wanted to say thankyou for the joy you've given me from reading your books again and again, I'm sorry for mentioning another authors work but I thought "a song of ice and fire" was my favourite book and then I picked up 'the last kingdom' and I have been absolutely hooked.

I wanted to ask why do you think the people of our time connect with Uhtred's character?  could it be our sense of nationalism has increased numerous terrorist attacks or even always been there. I for one am proud to be Cornish Reading your books about Thomas of Hookton spurred me on to have a go at archery at an open day at the local archery club,  I'd never picked up a bow before but remarkably had "a natural ability" so the instructor said anyway and I even didn't use the sights but felt where the arrow would go. I've just bought a bow and target set to see how good I really am so thankyou for that.

Are there likely to be any more books on Thomas of Hookton? 1356 was a nice surprise and a great read. In one of your answers on your questions page you mentioned that some of the earlier Sharpe books are valuable, I was lucky enough to be given the whole series a few years ago with what I think are the older covers but I'd never sell them, another great character but is he too old now for more adventures?

And finally.... I hope I haven't waffled on and can't wait to find out what happens to Uhtred and his friends thanks for the great reading and I hope there's many more

Antony Ginnelly

 

A

Because he’s a rogue, he breaks the rules, but he’s on our side.

I don't have further plans for Thomas of Hookton....but I do hope to write another Sharpe book if I live long enough!

 


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

How do you envision Uhtred's wolf shields?  Would it be a full-on snarling front view or a side profile?  From what I've seen, most Viking shields just had alternating colored panels as their design.  Would something a bit more elaborate be unheard of?  I have a idea for a Viking shield I would like to design.  It is a black field with the Midgard Serpent in red coiled around its circumference and grasping its tail in its mouth at the top of the shield.  I am sure that there is no record of such a shield, but is it plausible that there were Viking shields with similar designs?

Alan Kempner

A

Oh, I always imagine it sideways, and yes, I think your idea sounds very plausible. I can’t believe they didn’t use badges on shields, but of course none has survived.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have read a lot of your work and have been thoroughly entertained. And I thank you. I just finished Warriors of the Storm and as always, I was not disappointed. When do you expect the next chapter in the life of Uhtred? And will you ever write a series as long and in depth as the saxon tales?

Daniel Dunlap

A

I am writing the next book of The Last Kingdom series now.

I doubt it! I’m getting old. But who knows?


Q

Hi Bernard,

33 year old that grew up reading your books and still gets as much joy from a new one as I did at getting a new Sharpe out of the library 20+ years ago.

In the Uhtred books, one of the things that often halt the seemingly unstoppable advance of a Dane army is their fear of losing valuable men- even when their superior numbers make victory a near certainty. Is this a fear that has been recorded in historic literature? Is it as acute a concern as it often appears in the book, or is it a useful plot device? I was just keen to understand more about how your writing process works.

Genuine thanks for the hours (days/weeks!) of pleasure your books have given me.

Michael

P.S for the love of all the gods, write another Starbuck!

A

I don’t recall a contemporary source, but one is hardly needed! Armies were (on the whole) fairly small and trained men were valuable . .


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Q

Thank you for writing these fascinating and very addictive books. The characters are so life-like in that they have a similar dark humour to myself, and I have laughed at his quotes and insults - having heard (and given) similar quips in police locker rooms and canteens over the years. I enjoy history as a subject but knew little of this period and I have learned so much by reading these, despite it being an incredibly complicated time. I have just today finished Warriors of the Storm and I am desperate to find out if the fabulous Uhtred gets back to Bebbanburg. If book ten is underway please let me know when I can get hold of a copy!

Diane Walsh

 

Hi Mr Cornwell,

I wanted to contact you, to say " Thank you, for giving me so much pleasure".I watched the TV Series The Last Kingdom, and had to read the complete series, of books,which my husband decided to surprise me with, for my Yule present. I haven't been able to put them down, as they are so compelling. I felt as if Uthred, was in the room with me, he seemed so real.I knew, I would enjoy the books, as I had read all The Sharpe series, which I also enjoyed  to the same extent.Just a quick question, will there be another book in The Last Kingdom Series? If so do you know when will it be published?I'm now bugging my husband to buy, the rest of your books, keeping my fingers crossed lol.Once again Thank you for bringing history to life, and the pleasure of your books.With Thanks

Marina Chaplin

 

A

I am writing the next book now.  Hopefully we'll see it published in September (in the UK).


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I just inhaled your 9 Saxon books and came here greedily looking to see if a publication date had been announced for the 10th.

In recent years revisionist documentaries on the dark ages had me groaning. They always seemed to be based on the premise that people believed the inhabitants of the dark ages to be incompetent buffoons with no redeeming features. It seems patronising to the people of that time to suggest that the dark ages weren't so dark because they could still build large wooden houses. Civilisation clearly went backwards for some time. That shouldn't mean that the people of those times weren't fascinating nor that they didn't have an original thought. I wonder if the academics aren't a little over protective of the honour of the people they are studying.

Which is why one of my favourite aspects of the book is imagining Uhtred pondering the lost glories of Rome. At those points the book almost feels like a science fiction post apocalypse story. I find myself trying to imagine a 22nd century Uhtred making do with old weaponry though the specifics of such a story escape me. I realise I might be edging towards breaking the contact rules. However I don't believe this to be original or complete enough a thought to be worth anything and hereby relinquish it to the commons. If a short story of a 22nd century Uhtred did appear my reward would just be to read it. I only wanted to relay thoughts on the books.

My other thought - and I suppose my question - is on your prolifacy. Do you understand it yourself and do you discuss it with other slower or equally prolific writers? Is it something innate or learned? Is it purely work ethic or is it to do with the way that you write? I would love to see a discussion between you and a famously slower writer. For instance, to take the edge off my obsequiousness, are there qualities that slower writers tend to have in their writing that you are jealous of. Alternatively do you sometimes hear the excuses of writers who miss their deadlines and feel they just need their socks pulling up? I have no specific question - though I'm not asking for an essay in response - perhaps just a thought or two on the subject.

Many thanks for the joy,

Adam

 

A

I suspect we think of the post-Roman and pre-conquest era as ‘dark’ simply because there’s a dearth of source material, and what exists isn’t particularly helpful. That gives historians very little to cling to. I don’t think any historian belittles the achievements of men like Alfred, Aethelstan and Canute (though Aethelflaed has been overlooked), but perhaps it’s difficult to perceive their relevance to contemporary events, and history does have a useful role to play in explaining who we are now. I think (I hope modestly) that the relevance of the books I write about Uhtred are to explain exactly what England is and how it came to exist, and in many ways the Saxon period is the bedrock of ‘Englishness’. That bedrock was to be overlaid by the post-Norman kings and their Norman-French aristocracy, but it emerges again during the Hundred Years War and it’s still there. Debates (and oh god there will be debates ad nauseam) about whether Britain should be in the EU or whether Scotland should be independent are affected by England’s notion of itself, and we can’t understand that notion unless we understand where we came from. This really doesn’t answer your question! But it’s all you’re getting on this hungover Monday morning after a Superbowl party!

 

I wish I had a work ethic. I have a lazy ethic. I doubt writers should be judged by the quantity of their output. After all if you’re writing adventure stories (which is what I do) then your job is a great deal easier than it is for someone who is uncovering the human soul. I started as a journalist, writing scripts for the old Nationwide programme on BBC TV, and we had to transmit 60 minutes of television every Monday to Friday. It really didn’t give you time to be fussy, the scripts had to be written and we learned to be fast. Am I jealous of slower, probably more meticulous writers? No! I enjoy what I do, and I admire what many slower writers achieve . . . which prompts the query whether my books would improve if I gave them more time . . . I think not . . . mainly because we write in whatever way works best for us and what works for me is a looming deadline and speed.


Q

Hello Bernard

Hope you and Judy had a pleasant Yuletide!

I read Warriors of the Storm and enjoyed it as much as..well, as much as the last one!

By "I have business in the North!" I assume Uhtred means business delivered with the sharp edge of a sword, rather than the kind of business that involved Board meetings and pie-charts...?

Wanted to ask a few questions, if that's ok...

It was interesting that Haestan's luck finally ran out in Warriors of the Storm, and I like that he was denied Valhalla. Why did you decide to kill him at this point though? Had Haestan just out-lived his usefulness to you as a writer?

I remember many years ago reading Sharpe's Revenge, (probably my favourite one actually)and you saying that you always imagined Sharpie would end his days as a grumpy country Squire, not in France, with a Frenchwoman! But that "Heroes choose their own Stories..." So, I was wondering if Uhtred has ever surprised you in a similar way?

The final thing I was wondering was an opinion...

I don't know if you saw this, but about 13 years ago the BBC  did a poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. At the time I voted for Wellington, but now after you kindly explained things to me in your books...I think I would vote  for King Alfred. After all, without him, there would be no England!  I think Alfred came in just outside the Top 10 in the end.

I wanted your opinion on the Top 10.

Churchill was Number 1, and behind him were, (I can't remember the order),  Brunel, Darwin, Nelson, Elizabeth the First, Newton, John Lennon, Cromwell, Princess Diana and Shakespeare, do you consider that a fair list? And who would you vote for as the Greatest Briton?

Hope I've not taken up too much of your time with this! I'm supposedly writing a novel myself, so maybe I should be getting on with THAT,  rather than sending you this!

Hope you have a good week.

Regards

Matt Copley

Wiltshire

A

I think he’d stopped interesting me . . .

He astonished me by marrying Eadith. They seem to be happy so I’m indulging him . . . for the moment.

I think it’s a very fair list, though I would probably demote Princess Di and John Lennon, not because they weren’t significant, but they’re probably on the list because they were recent and so prominent in peoples’ memories. I’d put Elizabeth I in top place, and I’d add Jane Austen and, naturally, the first Duke of Wellington. I’d also be perverse and, because of the joy she gave and because she was simply a wonderful person, put Nell Gwynne way up there.


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I only have one concern in this life.  It haunts me daily.  At work, at home changing nappies and wiping snot from little faces that look like mine. Even in the local supermarket when the nappies run out! Will there ever be another book in the last kingdom series?  In truth I'd prefer more books but would be glad of even one more.  I don't think I could cope with not knowing if Uhtred ever bashes his enemies by the sea :( I have guessed (hoped) that he does from your clues, however, I need more blood!  You have given me oceans of the stuff I know, but just a little more?

Susan Coupland

A

There will be another - I'm writing it now!


Q

Bernard.

I have been an avid reader of your books for longer than I care to remember. One problem.

Write more. I love them.

From ' Sharpe' to ' Uhtred '. Fantastic. Though I must say neither tv series, although good ,do your books justice. Could you tell me when your next book is out?

Thanks.

Paul.

 

A

I'm writing the next book of Uhtred's tale now.  With any luck it will be ready for publication by autumn.


Q

I have read a lot of your books and I am absolutely obsessed with Uhtred's story but I thought it would be interesting if there was a possibility of "spinoff" like just with the backstories of other minor characters, that were mentioned. For example Ida the Flame-bearer, Ragnar the Younger, Ravn, or any other characters. Have you ever thought of doing any works like this?

Thanks for writing your stories by the way, I have read each book in the series 2-3 times. Also, I write some stories about your characters (they are not very good) just for fun. What I wrote about Finan was completely wrong though. I really liked the backstory that was revealed in Warriors of the storm.

-Jim Brook

 

A

No 'spin-offs' are in my plans...


Q

Hi Bernard,

I remember reading once that one of your biggest regrets of the Sharpe series was killing Hakeswill off. He made a brilliant villain! My question: I've often wondered, reading your brilliant Last Kingdom series (renamed recently to tie in with the excellent TV series?) if you imagined Haesten to be sort of Uhtred's Hakeswill? The traitorous villain who always slipped away... Warriors of the Storm was such a good read - you seemed to tie up lots of loose ends / story threads with the deaths of long standing characters and finally learning Finan's story. Lucious to read - but I did worry you were beginning to draw it all to an end by giving us so much in one book...! I mean, he's getting on a bit, though I'm glad to read book 10 won't be the last! Bebbanburg surely soon?

One last thing - great to finally have my home, Lincoln, featured in the series! I actually live at the top of the hill, my street (the old Ermine Street) has four circles of brickwork laid into the road to mark where the entrance to the old roman forum used to stand. You can even still drive under a Roman gate a stones throw from our house. So much history here!

Thanks and looking forward to the next,

Simon

A

No . . . .I never did think of him in that way. Instead I often wonder about Obadiah’s twin brother, Jedediah . . . .


Q

I'm reading (and enjoying) Warriors of the Storm right now, but I had to stop and immediately register my (cordial) dismay. In response to a certain impulsive comment Uhtred made to Eadith, Uhtred then writes, "God, what fools women make of us."

Has Uhtred ever referenced a singular God, unless it was with scorn? Please tell me the future narrator Uhtred still knows that there are many Gods...

Thank you for your endlessly entertaining stories, particularly Uhtred & Dervel!

Jordan Nichols

A

Well, he knows and acknowledges it often! I think, on reflection, I’d have cut the word. You have a point!

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

This is a shot in the dark, but was Sharpe's father Alexander Hamilton Hume? I can't remember if he appeared in any of the novels - and not sure how the horse appears in this 'happy' person. He was born around 1762 and a reputed womaniser. Fought a duel and was forced to take office of a penal colony in Australia, then became a landowner.

Also, I'm really enjoying 'The Last Kingdom' TV adaptation. The acting and script are both excellent, although I would have liked a few more battles at key moments. Instead, they cut straight to the aftermath. But David Dawson portrays King Alfred just how I envisioned him in the novels. It would be great if they could film the rest of Uhtred's story. Episode 7 is tomorrow (Thursday) night UK time, HD 102 Channel justifies the scenery.

Also, have you seen or heard about 'The Man in the High Castle' featured on Amazon?

Robert Douglas

A

Nice try. Wrong, but nice!

I read the book many years ago . . . .a clever reconstruction of a post-war America that had lost to Axis powers.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Congratulations on the excellent latest addition “Warriors of the Storm” to the Saxon series. It had particular resonance for me (as with “The Empty Throne”) as I live in Chester. I have to confess having been a resident in the area for the last 30 years I hadn’t heard of Eddisbury Hill. I therefore took advantage during the Christmas break to pay it a visit. Not much to see now alas but I found the remains of the gate and section of double rampart interesting.

I also really enjoyed watching “The Last Kingdom” apart from the Saxon square/oblong/Roman scutum type shields which were annoying. I could live with the kite shields that appeared halfway through even though they are too early for this period. They must think the audience is stupid. Or maybe I am just being a history geek.

In the above last two books in the series, you included Brunanburgh in the story. I presume therefore you favour Bromborough as the site of this epic battle? If so I had thought you were lining it up as a grand finale however unfortunately when I checked the dates, Uhtred would be 80 years old so if he is still about he would just be giving sage-like strategy and tactical advice to Athelstan?

Will the next Saxon series book you are writing be the last?

Regards,

Peter

A

Yep, I’m aware of that difficulty . . . somehow we’ll get there, though!

No, I don't think it will be the last...


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

Can you tell me when we can expect the next volume of the Warrior Chronicles after Warriors of the Storm?

Although I do not want the story to end, I do want to know how it ends. Does he get Bebbanburg back or not?

Just to let you know, I have read most of your books and have been very much entertained by them, for which I thank you very much.

Regards

Jan Rynkiewicz

 

Are you going to write a 10th book in the last kingdom series were Uhtred gets his home back? I have read all the others plus all your other books apart from the Sharp books I find them brilliant and enjoy them very much. And i am waiting for the second series on tv

Robbin Elliott

 

Could you tell me when book 10 of the Saxon series will be released? I have just finished Warriors of the storm and already awaiting the next chapter of the story!!

Lesley McQueen

 

Hi Bernard.  I have greatly enjoyed all of your books to date; you really bring history to life in your novels.  I snapped up Warriors of the Storm, but again you left me hanging in mid air wondering if Uhtred ever gets to be Lord of Bebbenburg.

I am not asking for that to be answered, but encouraging you to get on with the tenth book of the series.  When do you expect do get it Published?

Keep on entertaining me please.

Kind regards,

Mick

A

I am working on the next book (10th) now.  With any luck we'll see it published in October!


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Another fan letter in your very long list, but I had to write to you to tell you how very much I've enjoyed your books.  From Sharpe to Uhtred to Nick Hook to Thomas of Hookton and much in between.  Your voice for the characters is perfect for me.  I do get irritated with Uhtred Senior when he's so intolerably crass, but he's a Warrior, isn't he?

Am chewing through The Empty Throne and waiting for the last book.to hit Barnes and Noble.

Two things:  In one  of the middle books, Uhtred's stallion is called Smoca, then in the next book "Smoka"??  (Sorry, among other jobs I was a copy editor.) Also, any plans for book(s) on the Norman Invasion?

Once again, thank you for sharing your multi-talented self with your admirers.

Patt Olson

A

Thank you!  No, no plans for the Norman Invasion


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

First I would like to thank you for the many hours of reading pleasure you have given me. I love history and historical novels! I love the sharp chronicles and have read them over and over again. Actually I don't think any of your books l own have been read only once.

My only gripe is the Netflix Tv programs The last kingdom! I do not know where to start, Ragnar the elder not blonde, no Stepa  Snorta, no Eldwulf the smith, no Windviper, no Rorik. The list goes on but it is entertaining none the less.

I am curious as to wether you oversaw the Tv series storyline or had little to do with it?

I feel it could have became as popular as game of thrones (which between you and me I dislike, who creates characters for you to barrack for then destroys them over and over again? Not to my taste) Anyway thank you again and I am looking forward to the next novel in this series I hope it is a very long book and would love for the series to continue for many more perhaps you could follow Uhtred the younger. I for one would not grow tired of reading about England's making it has always interested me which seems odd as I am from the colonies and we Australians are usually only interested in England when we are beating them at cricket!

Regards

John H

 

Mr. Cornwell,

I'm a big fan of The Last Kingdom book series and just finished watching the first season of the television adaptation. While it was enjoyable to see the characters brought to life, there were quite a few deviations from the story.  I understand with any book to TV adaptation there are going to be some modifications, but sometimes it's hard to understand how they decide which characters and events to change or leave out. I always enjoyed Steapa in the books, and giving his role to Leofric didn't seem to do the part justice. How much input do you have, if any, on the changes made?

Adam

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have read your book and its sequels, apart from the last two, several times and thoroughly enjoyed it each time. I was always of the opinion, that it would lend itself for turning into a TV series. So I was very excited when I saw it advertised a couple of weeks ago. I have watched both episodes and must say that I was thoroughly disapointed. The changes made are so many and in so many dimensions as for the story to hardly make sense. Certainly the deep psychological reasons for Uthred's divided loyalties, to my mind, do not come across very well.

How happy are you with it. I assume you have to give  permission? Look forward to your comment and will shortly read the two latest sequels. I do so enjoy them.

Thank you for writing such interesting books.

Dagmar

 

 

 

A

I have no input, nor do I want any!  Best to leave it to the experts....but I was delighted with the series!

 

 


Q

Warriors of the Storm - Final words of Historical Note:  "He has further to go, so he will march again."

Strongly suggests that we can expect a sequel to this wonderful series!!  ??????

I have thoroughly enjoyed this series.    Thank you!   I have also greatly appreciated the historical notes and agree, not sufficient early history is taught in the schools.   You clearly show how much early history could be appreciated by students.

JudithAnne Henderson

 

Hi,

I have recently discovered your Saxon stories and have read all nine. I love the amount of researched detail you put in that makes the book feel so real and authentic.  The only down side is now I am on a cliff-hanger waiting for the next book. When is it going to come out. Will it be the last one?

Robert Nemeth

 

The Saxon Stories - Absolutely fascinating. Thank you for such an interesting, gripping and historically accurate series of books.

I have just finished the last book in the series - "Warriors of the Storm" - and was sad when there were no more pages to read. From the very first, when Uhtred witnessed Ragnar "oar-dancing" off the coast of Bebbanberg, your stories have held me spellbound and at the end of each book I couldn't wait to get to the library for the next in the series.

The end of your last novel in the series said of Uhtred - "He has further to go, so he will march again." Does this hint at further novels in the series? I certainly hope so.

The history of England fascinates me in that, in time when danger threatened its very existence, there was always a "hero" to save the day. Nelson at the Nile and at Trafalgar, Wellington at Waterloo and Churchill in the darkest hours of World War Two. Thank you for your history of England's formation.

I have also read "The Grail Quest" series, "Agincourt", "1356" and "The Fort".

Kind regards.

Peter

(New Zealand)

 

Happy New Year..... I have just read Warriers of the Storm which was brilliant.  I have thoroughly enjoyed the whole series..... Do you intend to publish another, book ten?

Curious....

With warm wishes.... Heather

 

A

I am writing the next book of the series now - I don't think it will be the last!


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I have just read your latest book Warriors of the Storm. Having read the first book when it was released in 2004 I have been an avid follower of Uhtred. Having read the Warlord Chronicles I appreciate the content of the books as being fiction but heavily based on facts. It is a wonderful gift you have of bringing a forgotten era to life and generating interest in the period. Your portrait of Arthur as a warrior and not a King sits very comfortably with me. A great story.

Having recently had my DNA tested I find I am a Celt which came as a great surprise being English. Always told the Welsh, Irish and Scots were the real Celts. I have since read more and wonder if this could be an interesting story for you.

At present I cannot wait for what may be Utred's last chapter.

Great work, thanks a lot

Regards

Peter

A

The story is really told in the three Arthurian books which tell (partly) of the Saxon invasion of Britain . . . not sure I’ll go back to that era, though, sorry!

 


Q

I love all of your books! I love everything about the history of England. and your books are exactly what I have been looking for, in terms of historical facts mixed with fiction.

You have said that the character of Uhtred is an idea based on your ancestor.Have you ever made your genealogy  open to your readers? My family and my husband's family go very far back in English and Scandinavian history- according to Ancestry.com. The  DNA tests that I had done verify this fact. The name Cornwell just showed up in one my DNA matches and I would like to know if we are distantly related. And it would be cool to think that one of my ancestors may have had a role in some of the stories  that you write about.

I know you are very busy right now,but I think that you have an interest in family history as I do. I would love to know more about your family.

Sincerely.

Candace Cobb

A

I really don’t know too much about my ancestors – the Uhtred of the books is invented (though there was a man by that name in that period).  What I know was discovered by a member of my birth family.  The surname is distinctive enough to make them quite easy to trace through a tangle of records. I haven't double-checked the Oughtred family's research, but there is a genealogist in the family, and his researches do appear to be accurate, and we have records of the family stretching right back to the post-Roman period.  The family never lost its high status (an Oughtred was one of the founding knights of the Garter), and high status does often seem to go with such record-keeping.  Cornwell is my birth mother's side - and I know nothing of that genealogy!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

first let me thank you for the hundreds of hours of reading enjoyment that your books have given me. I have read them all; many of them twice.  Uhtred's saga is my favorite and I eagerly await "The Warriors Of The Storm" on 1/19/16.

I watched the final episode of the BBC's "The Last Kingdom" today. I thought the series was well done.  Readers generally tend to be critical of adaptations of of their favorite novels, citing even the smallest plot deviation as heresy, but TLK was quite enjoyable. Do you know if a second season is in the works?  I certainly hope to see more of Uhtred and his adventures.

Thanks,

Frank Evanov

 

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I saw The Last Kingdom series on the TV and that made me want to go and buy all the books and read them. I have bought the first book The Last Kingdom and i am loving it but i bought the TV book cover, so my question is will all of the series be re released with the TV book covers with Alexander Dreymon on? If yes then where will i be able to buy all the series with the TV book covers?

Many thanks,

Paige

A

There will be a second season so I imagine books will be re-released with new covers.  Sorry, I have no idea when?


Q

I saw a couple of suggestions as to the meaning of Uhtred's favourite saying and wondered if the old Scottish granny's one of 'what's for you, won't go past you', perhaps translates it best. It was said to me and all my friends as we were growing up (I'm now 65) and covered all future employment hopes, lost loves and anything else we wanted but didn't yet have. Love your books, the tv programs are great but don't do them justice!!!

Elizabeth

 

Dear mr Cornwell,

I would like to know if Fate is inevitable is the correct translation of wyrd bid ful arad. Because I like the german translation and I think this will be my next tattoo. So it should be right.

Yours faithfully,

Luke

A

That’s a good enough loose translation! But the original (from an Old English poem) is fairly short and sweet – fate is inexorable!

 


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell,

A couple of questions if I may. Will Uhtred ever get to fight for and keep  Bebbenburg? If yes would you please put me out of my misery and tell me when it will (if it is) be published or even written. Fascinated at the thought of Sharpe re-joining the fight. I can't imagine where in time and place this would be as far as I recall (and I have a bad memory) nothing much happened from after 1815 until the Boer Wars in the late 19th Century. Your books have been read by me many times as has Sharpes adventures on DVD. I really do not know who is the most entertaining writer between, your good self, Wilbur Smith, Simon Scarrow and EE (Doc) Smith. I just hope you continue to write for many years to come.

Don Kinder

 

Hello Bernard,

Will the Uhtred series continue after his death? I particularly enjoyed the chapter written through his sons eyes.

Kind regards

Will

 

Good morning,

I have become a bit fan of your books and I read about one a month in average. I've just finished the Warriors of the Storm. Is it the last one from Uthred's story?

How does he finish? What is the final book of my hero?

Thanks in advance

Flo

 

I started off watching the Last Kingdom on BBCAmerica and loved the show. I think it's the best thing on TV right now. I have now begun reading the series. There appears to be 9 books in the series, and was wondering if you had an idea how many more books until the concluding novel?

Thanks,

Brian Weber

 

How many more books do you think it'll be before we get to the end of Uhtred's tale?

Riki

A

I wish I did! I’m writing the 10th and all I can tell you is that won’t be the last.

I’m so glad you enjoyed that because I wasn’t (and am still not) sure that it worked. I think Uhtred will have to live to an impossibly old age! I’ll have to tackle the problem of what voice to use when he’s beyond climbing aboard a horse or wielding Serpent-Breath – a problem for the next year or two!

 

 


Q

Dear Bernard,

I have enjoyed your books immensely and have read them all. However, I feel badly let down by the choice of actor that plays Uhtred. He is not how I imagine Uhtred to be and more so he is not the Uhtred of your books. The choice of actor for Alfred was perfect and spot on. Why was such a mistake made in casting Uhtred? I really am very disappointed indeed.

Sean Paul Kennedy

 

Dear mr Cornwell

I would like to know your opinion about the tv series of the last kingdom. Offcourse they make spectaculair tv,  but to a hardcore fan of your books the hardly do your books any justice. For example; SerpentBreath in your books she's a beaty offcourse, but simple, intended to be a tool, but still a masterpiece to the smith who made her. In the tv series Uthred walks up to a smith and just orders a carnival sword with some shiny bauble in her heft for like 12 pieces of silver. My second grief is the fight to the death wich was ordered by king Alfred between Uhtred and Steape Snotor (one of my personal favourite characters). To my utter horror they made Uhtred fight Aelfric! . Thats where i stopt watching, started wondering if the producers actually read any off your books, and decided to read your saxon stories for the 8th time.

Last off all i like to say that i can't wait for your next book. I'm curious how Uhtred will finally capture Bebbanburg.

Greetings from Dordrecht Holland

Jeroen

A

I'm delighted with the TV series!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwall

I have been reading your Saxon stories for a number of years, since the first book was printed and am fascinated by them, I have just reread them all and have read warriors of the Storm, could you tell me if there is a follow up please,  you can't leave it there I have been waiting from the beginning for Uhtred to regain his inheritance Thank you for taking the time and trouble to read this note,

yours in anticipation

June

 

Is there a book to follow Warrior of the Storm?

Raymond Parr

 

Hello.

I'm a big fan of the Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories and would love to know when I might be able to read the next instalment (I've just finished 'Warriors of the Storm').

And thanks for writing such great stories that I have fallen in love with.

Sarah.

A

I am writing the 10th book of the series now!


Q

Dear Bernard,

Very many thanks for all the pleasure your books have given me, specially Sharpe and the Last Kingdom series.  For me, your writing style is just perfect, with exactly the right blend of atmosphere, information and action in superb balance.

What I am curious about, though, is your vision of Uhtred, as up to Warriors of the Storm I don't recall any instance of him describing himself -- why would he, except for mentioning the grey hairs in his beard!  But in Warriors we at last have a hint, where he refers to his second son as 'said to resemble me, blunt-faced and scarred.'  That, Bernard, is exactly how I had imagined him from your writings, together with the indication that he is big but a strong and athletic man.

So, although I enjoyed the BBC 'Last Kingdom', I was a little disappointed with the casting of Uhtred, not big enough and rather too slick looking.  I think the actor who played Leofric would have been more suitable, right down to the voice too!  Was the BBC version REALLY how you imagined Uhtred to look?

I was also disappointed that Steapa seems to have been left out -- will he appear later?  It would be nice to see Pyrlig too, specially with his brand of humour.  Will they appear do you think?

Once again, thanks for all your superb books.

Hugh Coster

A

I don’t know whether Steapa or Pyrlig will appear – I hope Pyrlig does, but suspect the series is too late for Steapa, but as I try very hard NOT to interfere or offer ‘advice’ or get involved, I don’t know. Personally I like Alexander Dreymon as Uhtred! I think he’s terrific! Perhaps none of the characters are exactly as I imagined them, but nor did I expect them to be as the film-makers don’t have a live-feed from my imagination, but I think their interpretations are just as valid and, truly, they’ve done a wonderful job!


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Hi Bernard,

First, a Happy New Year to yourself, your friends and family, and fellow historical fiction fans! I'm enjoying 'Warriors of the Storm' at the moment. I do have a question: when Uhtred is looking for some kind of omen, you mentioned the death of star. Did people in Saxon England understand that stars were distant suns and the concept of supernovas?

Robert Douglas

A

I doubt it! I’ve no idea if they had any conception of a supernova! Probably thought it was a lamp of heaven exploding! They certainly used the stars to navigate, but beyond that? Sorry, I’ve no idea.

 


Q

Greetings Mr. Cornwell --

I've just started reading The Burning Land ... I've read the series leading up to this and know your character Uhtred pretty well (although that sounds silly since you know him best of all). I was wondering how you decided to make the monks copy the wrong version of the story ... in oral cultures it is important to get the story in writing correct? Unless, of course, there is someone who wants the story retold in a different way so that the truth is forgotten. I live in a valley where a person's word is very important in communication. I'm very interested in orality versus literacy, and how stories are told, any insight would be most appreciated.

Amber Gordon

A

I doubt there’s much political pressure in your valley! The point of that was that Uhtred is a pagan and he’s dealing with a church that dislikes him and is under the (financial) patronage of his enemy, Aethelred. The monks who wrote the annals in the middle-ages were not striving for the objective truth, but were flattering their paymaster, religion and patrons.

 


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Q

Firstly, I wish to thank you for your stunning writings - I have read every single book you have ever published apart from Warriors of the Storm which I am saving for this Christmas.  Every one of your characters, from Derfel to Uhtred, from Campion to Hookton, from Starbuck to Sharpe have kept me company for several years now so thank you.

I have always found it very interesting that the Viking Rollo secured a foothold on the River Seine, was able to demand land from the French and then went on to establish Normandy.  It fascinates me that he was the ancestor of William the Conqueror.  This seems to me a great story but I can't find anybody who has written of this.  Do you know if anybody has taken up this story?  Would it be something you would find interesting or have ever considered writing about?  I have often wanted to research more and write a book myself on this topic but there does not seem to be a lot written about him.

Not sure if this is a question or a thought, but would like to know if you think Rollo and his descendants were interesting enough to write a series of books upon.

John Hinson

A

There’s very little and yes, it is fascinating! I’ve thought about it – Rollo is more or less contemporaneous with Uhtred so they might meet!

 


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Hello Mr. Bernard,

My name is Jovana and I'm from Montenegro.

I know you're busy man, but I hope you can find time to answer me. I don't know why, I can't explain it, but i became attached to one of your characters from book "Saxon stories". That character is Mildrith and to my regret you do not mention her after second book and we don't know is she alive and well, so I wanted to ask you to tell me something about her future, you are the only one who knows it. Does she, maybe, meets Uhtred again, does she really dedicates her whole life to God or maybe she starts new life, away from everyone and everything? And after all, is she happy? I would really like to know all that and I would be very grateful if you could give me a little more detailed response.

Thank you in advance,

Best regards.

Jovana

A

I’ll try to tell you in a future book!


Q

As they did with the Sharpe series, the BBC did a great job interpreting the Warrior Chronicles to the screen. The casting was perfect. They were just as I pictured them while reading the books. The final episode left me wanting for more. Will there be more?

Love all your books.

Richard Kadien

 

Gidday Bernard,

I have been watching The Last Kingdom tv series,& while it took a while to grow on me-love the books,& a brunette Uhtred was strange-I now love the show,especially Alfred.Can you tell us if a second series will be made?  I would love to see Finan the agile on the screen

.Cheers Wayne

.Merry Christmas.

 

The books are great. I have only read 8...1 to go. But the BBC series was better than Sharpe.   Please help them make the next Uhtred series just as good.  When will it be transmitted?

George Patterson

 

I am an uber fan...and have read everything. In fact some years ago...the Sharpe series kept me sane while pursuing a Ph.D. ... got to escape!!

Please let your fans know immediately when the green light gets turned on for Season Two of The Last Kingdom!!

In the mean time....stay healthy and keep writing.

Loyd Ganey

A

Yes!  My understanding is there will be a season 2 for The Last Kingdom tv series.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell!

I've just finished Warriors of the Storm! Just one more great Uhtred book. Stiorra and Sigtryggr are a charming pair!

Several old characters died in this book. And I wanted to ask what do you feel about the antagonists in your books? Does Uhtred mirror your view on them? Or maybe sometimes you sympathize with them, their cause? Foe example I've always liked Haesten and understood his choice. I think Uhtred wasn't just to him

I've just started to read Warriors of the storm and almost at once was so much saddened by one of the oldest characters' death. I must admit Haesten was one of my most beloved characters along with Svein from the Pale Horseman (It's so sad they were dropped out of the TV series.) And not just because I love pagans more than their enemies, but because he was a really bright and colourful character, cheerful and witty. I really felt Uhtred didn't do him justice taking his sword away. I could never blame Haesten for breaking his oath for how could he fight against his own people? Uhtred himself too many times led Ragnar down even though claiming brotherhood.

So I wanted to ask what do you feel about the characters that are antagonists of the main ones? Do you sometimes feel sympathy for their cause? Or does for example Uhtred mirror your attitude towards them?

Thank you so much for all your wonderful books, especially for Arthur and Uhtred. Now I'm reading forth and worrying about one more beloved Dane - Sigtryggr Anna

 

 

A

Sometimes I like them a lot, sometimes not. I can’t say I was ever fond of Haesten, but I did like Cnut!

 


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Dear Mr Cornwell

From which of Uhtred's sons is your family descended please?

David A Bryden

A

The oldest – but in truth my Uhtred is fictional, though my ancestor is real enough.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I started watching the Last Kingdom on BBCA America (because it looked very similar to Vikings on the History Channel) when it first came out and when I found out it was based on a book series I started reading the novels.  I just finished reading the 3rd book in the series.  I thorough enjoy your writing, including your details on the daily life (food eaten--calf's foot jelly; bathing habits, etc.) of England during the middle ages.  I'm a student of history myself, primarily church history (M.Div.), but I almost double-majored in history at the BA level.  Perhaps one day when I retire I'll complete my Ph.D. overseas in church history and historical theology.

In any case I have several questions regarding your writing and any literary recommendations you could provide:

Do you have books/authors you'd recommend reading that deal with the Vikings in Scotland and Ireland?  I'm interested in the overall Viking impact on the British Isles, but from a fictional standpoint.

Does Uhtred's pull between the Viking religion and Christianity, reflect elements of your own faith?  It seems like you are more than just a casual observer of religion when I read your stories, including the interplay between the various characters, good or bad.

Thank you and best wishes this holiday season.  Now onto Book Four.

Ken

 

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I am obviously an enormous fan of yours, as are my father and brother. We have all read the Saxon Chronicles and The Sharpe series. Even as I write this, I am watching The last Kingdom on BBC America. Never in my wildest dreams could I have thought I would be so lucky as to see Uhtred on screen.  Anyway, I'll try to keep this brief. I am writing to you because I am curious if you feel that you may have projected some of your own views of religion onto Uhtred. I ask this because I closely identify with the opinions of Uhtred and many of the Danes in your novels. Personally, I was raised Catholic but obviously that didn't take. When Uhtred and Mildreth bicker about god and baptisms and et cetera, it really gets my blood boiling. Sometimes I feel that the parallels to my life are too perfect. I have a recent ex-girlfriend who, towards the end of our relationship, started to become very religious (Southern Baptist - the worst kind). It wasn't long before we began to butt heads about everything (churchgoing, praying, even immunizations - she began refusing them for some absolutely absurd reason).

Sorry, enough about me. Long story short, do you find yourself drawing from your own perceptions and life experiences with religion when you gave Uhtred his skepticism and jaded opinions on the subject?

Thank you very much for your time.

Respectfully Yours,

Mike Doyle

A

 

I’d recommend The Hammer and the Cross by Robert Ferguson, and use his bibliography to explore further.

 

That question made me smile, thank you. The answer is yes.


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

I'd like to point your attention to a sentence in "Death of Kings" Chapter 8, which I believe is a mistake:

"The house had once belonged to the older Æthelred, Ealdorman of Mercia and husband to my father’s sister"

Through all the instances where that relations was mentioned before, the older Æthelred was the brother of Uhtred's mother.

Aside from that, I am enjoying the series and thank you for it.

Danes Lover

 

A

I’m sure you’re right, I’ll check, and thank you


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Dear Mr Cornwell

I am thirteen years old and I have read all of your books about Uhtred exept for Warriors of the storm,which i will be reading soon. I would just like to ask you if Uhtred will ever retake Bebbanburg as I would love him too.

Many thanks,

Toby.

A

Keep reading...


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I just wanted to say how much have enjoyed the Saxon Stories. A year is an unbearable amount of time to wait for the next in the series. I particularly like the way Uhtred employs guile and strategy as well as sheer force of arms to achieve an outcome.

I come originally from a Saxon clan ('Bicanleag') so these tales have a real resonance for me.

I'd really like someone to write to me explaining how to phonetically say 'Wyrd bid ful araed'. Maybe I should contact Saxon scholar Michael Wood.

Thank you for giving me so much pleasure in these remarkable books but also for providing a leap in time by which we can better understand the world of Alfred and Uhtred.

Tim Beckerley

A

I'm no expert on Old English pronunciation, but my guess is that it's pronounced Weird bith full arraid.

 

 


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell!

I heard that you were working on the tenth book of the Uhtred series, and I am starting Book Three. This brought up an interesting question to me.

What is your productivity like i.e. do you set a goal? Also, what is your process when creating plot lines? I thought so far that the Pale Horseman had an incredible plot. DO you create chapter outlines?

Keep up the INCREDIBLE work!

Nick

A

An outline?  No, I don't.  I have a very broad idea of where I want the book to go, then just let the characters sort it out amongst themselves.  I'm not saying this is the right way to do it - some writers plot very carefully, and their books are great, but others, like me, leave it to instinct.

 

 


Q

Bernard.

Following the release of 'The Last Kingdom' on TV I went back to the beginning and re-read all 9 Uhtred books.

I live in Northwich in Cheshire - one of the salt towns, and I get all excited knowing Uhtred may have passed this way. Chester is a very historical city and even though it is not the place Uhtred would have known I have found myself walking the walls with your books in hand trying to envisage what Uhtred would of looked out upon. I have looked at Bromborough as a different town since discovering its history through your writing.

Its possible he passed through my town after visiting Erce in Buxton then travelling to Chester, but 'Warriors of the Storm' has some very detailed knowledge of our area and its history.

I have walked around Eddisbury Hill a few times and it felt great to put a picture to your vivid descriptions of the land, even though I am 1000 years too late. It certainly brings the imagery to life. I must walk the route from Chester to Eddisbury Hill next spring.

I was also impressed by a paragraph with Uhtred discussing salt mining with Athelflead. Where did you do your research? Have you been to visit Cheshire to gain a vision for your descriptive writing?

If you have not yet been and ever find yourself passing through can I recommend a visit to a little museum - http://weaverhall.westcheshiremuseums.co.uk/. It has some enlightening information on the history of salt mining from early history, details on the hill forts at Eddisbury, Kelsborrow and Oakmere, as well as a history of the Cheshire Archers (from your Grail series). These archers reputedly wore green, which I am convinced explains why the football teams of Nantwich and Northwich both play in green to this day.

Please keep writing, every one of your books is a pleasure to read, although having consumed the entire 9 books of the Saxon stories in 3 weeks, I think I need a break and catch up on the rest of my life!

Simon James

A

I have a very ancient book on salt mining in Cheshire. I have no idea why I have it, or why I bought it for tuppence in 1965, or why I kept it, but it came in useful!

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

We'd like to start by saying that my boyfriend and I love your books. (We just finished Uhtred and now we're onto Arthur.) We also are currently watching The Last Kingdom on BBC, and we are greatly disappointed with the way they've portrayed your characters and altered the plot. I know this always happens when books are made into movies or shows, but it seems to us they took far too much license.

I'm not really sure how the process works - I imagine you as the author might not have terribly much creative control over production?

Anyway, this is what we're really getting at - do you have any deals in the works for another network to pick this up and do it properly, say as a book-per-season kind of thing? I feel like this would be a great opportunity for a network other than HBO to give their answer to Game of Thrones (which I haven't found half as entertaining as your books). For whatever our opinion is worth, we think that people would really get into it if they had the opportunity to see the full story and get to know the characters with the depth you've given them in your writing (frankly we don't think BBC did you any favors on that front).

Also for what it's worth, of all the people who've narrated your books on audio, Jonathan Keeble takes the cake, he's great.

Anyway, we're hoping for some good news about another television production for the Saxon Stories but until then we will continue to enjoy your other work.

Thanks so much,

Laura and Mike

A

No, I don't think that's going to happen....


Q

Although the Last Kingdom is a brilliant show and overall the characters are extremely well selected (especially Alfred) do you agree that perhaps Uhtred is cast a little too short and perhaps a tad more on the "pretty" side than is appropriate?

Joe Day

 

 

A

I'm quite happy with the series!


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Mr. Cornwell,

I love reading your books. After re-reading The Empty Throne, I think I found a discrepancy in regards to a portion of the story. When the Lord Uhtred came ashore and met up with King Hywell, it was implied that all Lord Uhtred and his men had were seaxes, no swords and no shields. Later, Finan found two swords out of a pile of swords taken from Rognvald because of lack of swords.. He found Cnut's sword. But, then after being healed with it (via Eadith), he pulled Serpent-Breath out of its scabbard.and struck a boat in triumph and no pain. Before Sihtric brought the boat back. I thought they had no swords on the "pilgrimage". Am I wrong? Love your stories! Keep them coming!

Greg Williams

A

I have no idea, probably I’m wrong, but I don’t remember now.


Q

First, may I say that I've enjoyed every one of your books I've read(the entire Sharpe canon, The Last Kingdom, etc) That said, I found an error in Vagabond(a small one, perhaps), and decided to be a nit-picking intellectual nuisance, and point it out to you.

In your description of the battle between the Scots and the northern English forces, you described a Scot chopping down with a pike.  Sorry, but a pike is a 12-14 foot pole with a spear point on the end.  Its only use is for poking things(and, maybe, being stretched across a road so people will have to stop and pay their toll).\ The weapon you described(a pole with a spike on top, an axe blade on one side and a hook on the other) sounds very  much like a Lochaber axe.  An axe with a spike on top and one on the opposite side would be a halberd.  As far as I know(and I don't pretend to be anything near an expert), the Lochaber axe was used mostly by the Scottish  clansmen, in conjunction with the true claymore(the two-handed sword).

Forgive me if I seem too pedantic, but I've seen authors confuse pikes with halberds before(and even pointed it out to them).

By the way, I've been a member of the Society For Creative Anachronisms for the last 40 years; my persona has been that of a 9th century Norseman.  Uhtred is definitely of interest.

Your Admirer

Michael Grossberg

a/k/a Gardr Gunnarsson

A

I think you are nit-picking. Pike is an old word, very old, and originally encompassed what we’d call a mattock as well as axes. I think the sense is okay.

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

I am a huge fan of yours from Greece. I am a historian and sometimes I find it difficult to read historical fiction but your books are AMAZING! I love the way you tell your stories and it feels like I am a part of the story while I am reading it... The Saxon/Viking world it's something foreign from my culture but I have to admit that your books made me read more history books about this era. I wonder if you could tell me more about Uhtred. He is a real person? And if the answer is yes, how do you learn about him??

Thank you for reading my message!

 

Maria

A

Uhtred was a real person -  from a prominent family and an ancestor to my birth father.  In Saxon times they were, first, kings of Bernica (now lowland Scotland) then earls of Northumbria.  But the truth is we know very little about him other than he lived at Bebbanburg as his father and grandfather had done. So my tales of him are pure invention!


Q

I eagerly await January, and the next installment of Uhtred.

have been watching the show, and wondered what you thought of it, or if you had seen any of it.

the one thing so far that really got me...the guy who played skorpa, imo, was amazing!

Deb Zeigler

A

I agree!  He is amazing!!


Q

Hello Bernard,

Can I start by saying I am a big fan of all your work, especially the warlord series. I love reading about Saxon history and your stories bring them to life. I have been watching the series the last kingdom, and was wondering what your thoughts of it are? To be honest I'm not impressed I feel they have changed too much, from the fight with Ubba to the shields the Saxons use, even Beocca isn't the same. I feel the BBC want to make the Saxons look weak in history and make it look as if the Danes and Saxons were alien races when in reality we were similar in many ways as you well know. I don't mean to moan because the books are brilliant I'm just disappointed with the BBC and the programme. What are you thoughts on the show are you happy with how it's turned out?

Kind regards,

Bradley

 

Hello Bernard

I am a big fan; the first book I ever read from start to finish was Sword song and couldn't put it down. My reading skills were terrible but thanks mainly to your books and not wanting to stop reading them; my ability has vastly improved over the years.I am pretty sure I have read everything of yours predating hand held fire arms. They are all brilliant books, Uhtred’s story of the birth of England is still my favourite, the whole era intrigues me.

So when I heard the last kingdom was to be televised I was quite excited. Now I understand that the story in a book doesn’t necessarily work on screen and they have to cut sections to accommodate the budget. However I have one major gripe that I just can’t let go. Uhtred’s sword is completely wrong, the one in the series isn’t even from the right era it looks more medieval and is two handed. Also I imagine a decorative amber pommel would make it quite difficult to wield, without a weighted pommel the blade would be completely out of balance. I think serpent breath is as much a part of the story as some of the characters and this small detail has made me a little worried of what they are going to change next.

Have you seen the series and what do you think about it so far? If so would you change anything if you could?

Ash

A

I’m entirely happy with the series. Yes, they’ve made a few changes, but nothing that spoils it for me, and I hope you get to like it more!


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Q

I've been watching the BBC America series version of your book. I'm ashamed to admit I had no clue there was such a book series until this show. I will now have to start getting these books when I can afford them. My question to you is this.....do you happen to know if there will be a second season of The Last Kingdom? From what I saw on Amazon, there's a number of books from which they could continue the tv series. I'm really enjoying this tv version. The actors are doing a great job! I'm just sucked into watching Uhtred and his many adventures. I'd hate to see it end! I know there are still your books, but it's fun to also see the words come to life. In any case, I wasn't sure if you would know about the possibility of whether another season is possible? Many, many thanks!

Sincerely,

Keryn Aikman

A

We don't know yet, but hopefully we'll know soon!


Q

God morgon Bernard.

Its sunday noon here in Stockholm, Sweden... and i have just finished the last page in The Last Kingdom. i would just like to take the oppurtunity to thank you for a very very joyful read. I loved the book and and have already purchased all the others that will follow. I have two questions regarding the first book. And would love it if you would have the possibility to answer when and if you have the time.

 

  1. In the beginning of this story, Uhtreds father suggests that native brits also shared our (my) norse believes before christianity arrived to the islands. Its a subject i know very little of, but i am fully aware of studies that claim norse/scandianvian paganism had extreme simularities with pagan religions/belives in other parts of pre:christian Europe – finnish Kalavala, french pagansim, Wendels of the east, germanic tribes etc. But would you go as far as to say that pre:christian England even had our specific gods: Oden, Tor, Freja etc?

 

  1. At the very end of the book (the last pages) you say that the attack in the north east by danes could be debated – are you then refering to the attack on Lindisfarne in june 793? You dont think that specific attack took place, there and then? I have visited Lindisfarne with my far and i have awlays thought that the attack was very very well documented by archeological findings and monk documetation.

 

Thank you very very much for this excellent book. I loved it. Starting the next one this afternoon. If you would ever find yourself in Stockholm, id love to buy you a pint of ale for a long historic chat at any local inn here!

 

THANK YOU

 

Til Valhall

 

/Klas

A

The Saxons (and Angles and Jutes, i.e. the Germanic tribes who became the English) certainly did, and they brought those gods with them to Britain and so gave us names of the week (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday), place names (I grew up in Thundersley, and the list could go on and on). The people the Saxons conquered did not worship those Germanic gods, they had been largely Christianized by the Romans and we know very little of what religions they had before that conversion, but the Saxons were firmly in the Norse/Scandinavian camp before the Christians got to them.

 

The assault on Lindisfarne is very well documented; what I said in the Historical Note is whether that presaged a concerted attack on the Christian church. We know a number of bishoprics disappeared and many religious houses were ransacked, but was that part of a concerted campaign? We don’t know.


Q

Some years ago Norton & Co, New York republished the Aubrey/Maturin novels of Patrick O'Brian in a compendium set on high quality paper and binding.(5 novels per book). Do you have any plans to do this for the Sharpe books?

Regards

Martin Taylor

PS Love the latest Uhtred book -Warriors etc.

A

It's up to the publishers ...but it is unlikely - at least until the series is complete.


Q

Have just read Warriors, great as usual, will there be a tenth book, also the series is brilliant can't wait each week for next episode, Uhtred &Leofric are just like books,will there be another series?

Moira Ford

A

I am working on the tenth book of the series now.  I'm afraid I don't know yet if there will be a second season of the TV programme.


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Q

I love the books, reading warriors of storm now. I'm probably older than uhtred is at 63 and have trouble each time I start a new installment who is who. A family tree, like you get for royal families, would be of great help, perhaps added to each book like the translations of place names. Or added to your website. What do you think?

Peter Cain

A

I think it’s a good idea, I should do it!


Q

Where/when do I get my Uhtred t-shirt? I gotta believe I'm not the only one of yr fans who wants to know....

Bob J

 

A

Is there such a thing? I don’t have one yet . . . .


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I enjoy your story telling and the characters you provide. In my mind Uhtred was physically imposing, larger than most men, rugged and although not ugly was of moderate looks. The character in the TV series is a relatively slight handsome actor and does not fit the Uhtred mold at all. As the author do you have any say in the casting of key characters?

Regards

Stephen Winwright

A

I had no say in it, and I didn't want to have a say!  It would have been extremely foolish of the producers to even suggest that I might have a say - casting is a skilled business and I have no skill in it!

 

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

I have read quite a few of the books in this series over the years, and was wondering if the TV series is based just on the first book, or a number of them. If this is just the first book to be screened, than I sincerely hope there will be more adaptations.

Maria Stock

 

Hi Bernard,

Firstly, I would like to say how much I enjoyed reading books 1 - 9 of the Warrior Chronicles and pleased that Uhtred still has other battles to fight. My question is; in the TV series (best watch on telly on Thursdays for me), how many books will the 8 part drama cover? I am hoping this will be the first of many.

Superb piece of work and looking forward to book 10.

Regards,

Mike.

A

This first season (8 episodes) covers the first two books of the series - The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I'm guessing that your present plan is to continue coming out with Uhtred's adventures each year until his saga is finished, and only then turning to other writing projects.  Am I right?

Alan Kempner

 

Dear Bernard,

This is not the first time I've been in touch. I am going to read Warriors... next week; then what? Is there any point in mentioning Starbuck. So many of us wait hoping.

Kind regards

Lee Menzies

A

Half right. I want to write the 10th Uhtred story and see what happens after that . . . I have a feeling I might take a year off from him, but we’ll see.

 


Q

Do you have a connection? You sail a crabber, Sharpe (the original) played for Redruth. Uhtred involvement in the viking cornish battle at Hingston Down? I live at Mylor Harbour, Falmouth, admire crabbers, once sailed a gaff rig, once worked in Redruth after escaping Thundersley, where, as a child, living next to Thundersley Lodged often hunted in the Glen. Just curious.

Paul Rutley

.P S fascinated by Saxon connections in West Cornwall. Would love to write about the two Royal Manors there.

A

It’s a small world! I envy you living at Mylor Harbour! Much better than Thundersley!


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell,

First i'd like to apologize for my bad english, learning yet hehe...Hope that won't bother you sir.

Was eager to ask about Uhtred's personality, it's a common knowledge that he's a proud one.

Do you sir, contributed on Uhtred's  personality (TV) ?

That's a good point, because he has some bad and good things about him. His pride made things hard on him in the youth, he could get wealthy soon in the life if wasn't for that.

In the other hand, he always won his battles by mind, and then, by his sword. I believe that he just survived that long because of that.

I think it's something that requires some attention, because it could affect how people think about him on tv series. No one wants 'two Uhtreds'.

Warrior chronicles is the best saga i've ever read.

Regards,

Rodrigo.

 

I am a Brazilian fan of your books. First, sorry for my poor English. I’ve read everything you have published in portuguese language and some in english… Did you like the TV adaptation of "The last kingdom"?

I think they lost the essence of the tale… I will understand if you can't comment by contracts force

Jair Pedro de Assis

A

I am greatly enjoying the TV series!  I have no input, nor do I want any!  Best to leave it to the experts....


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Dear Mr Cornwell,

Love your books, read 'em all - just finished Uhtred's latest adventure.

Is Sharpe's father Dirk Hatteraick from guy Mannering???

My other guess would be Isaac Gullivar but think he was born too late.

Stu

 

A

Sorry, no.

Much too late!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

I will try my best to not make this sound like a long winded sermon but your books have changed my life. I first hard of you on the title sequence for Sharpe as a boy, I have dyslexia pretty bad and I hadn't read my first full book independently until I was 13 or 14.

The first book I ever read was The Winter King my old man (who is also dyslexic) was reading it and mentioned it was about King Arthur, back then Tales of King Arthur and his Knights, Robin Hood 100 year war were my optiates I couldn't get enough. One day when he set the book aside I picked it up and started to decipher the blurb, then I opened the book and read the opeing page, then I was hooked it took me a month to fumble my way through it. It took me another 4 months to read the other 2 in the trilogy.

I am now 25 and I have read everyone one of your books up to date including Warriors of the Storm. The Saxon Chronicles are by far my favourite even overtaking my love for Sharpe. Being born and Bred in the North East of England I feel I can relate to Uhtred and Bamburgh is one of my most favourite places in the World.

Which brings me onto my question. The final book finished with Uhtred stating he had business in the North, which I asume means the next book in the series will be based Northumbria. Previously when you have wrote about Northumbria you have only written about the major towns and cities such as Durham, York, Leeds, Chester-lee-Street. You have also made reference to hexham I believe.

I was wondering if in the next novel you would be writing about the landscape of Northumbria in more detail for example there is a small village approximately 10 miles west of Hexham on the river Tyne called Ovingham which comes from the Anglo-Saxon for Offa's Hamlet I believe. Also Escomb Church in County Durham is said to be the most complete Anglo-Saxon church in Britain.

I don't mean to be critical of your work but in the North we are very passionate about our heritage and it would be nice to have some of the littler places mentioned like you have done previously about Wessex and Mercia.

Many Thank

Kurtis Beck

A

Thanks for your message!

I just put Ebchester in? And Hexham again. And Benwell. I’m doing my best!

 


Q

Hello, Mr, Cornwell

Thank you for all you work.

After the ninth book of Uhtred, what's your next book?

the 10th Uhtred or another thing?

regards from Brasil

Marcelo

A

I am working on the next Uhtred now.


Q

I am watching The Last kingdom and to my surprise, I'm really enjoying it. They've left a lot of characters and events out but still, it's really good. It gives an authentic picture of the time period, dirty and bleak with lots of detail as to how the characters would have looked except for Uhtred who doesn't resemble the character in the book at all.

Anyway, I hope they will do the whole series after these first eight episodes.

Did you do any of the screen writing?  Did  they use you as a consultant?

Ann Madonna

A

No!  I'm not a scriptwriter! I worked in television for a decade and learned I know nothing about producing TV drama.  Glad to know you are enjoying it - me too!


Q

Hi

I'm an avid reader of historical fiction and can honestly say the Warrior Chronicles and Sharpe are among the best - however I'm a bit anxious about the forthcoming TV series of your Chronicles books. You know what its like  you paint your own picture of the fascinating characters you place in history and then when television decides to portray them you worry they just wont live up to your standard!! I hope you've had plenty of say in the development of the series- I know quite often this isnt the case! Are you happy with what the BBC have done with your books? I've noticed you're not happy with comparisons with Game of Thrones - quite rightly too! Just about to start Warriors of the Storm -I hope it's as good as the the rest of the series, you've got a lot to live up to!!  Keep 'em coming (though Uhtred must be 90 by now!) Cheers

Steve Jones

A

I’d be delighted to be compared to Game of Thrones, it’s just that I don’t think the two series are comparable, other than both have alpha males wielding edged weapons. Game of Thrones is a superbly intricate and elaborate fantasy that creates a whole new world, while The Last Kingdom is far less elaborate and rooted in reality. I admire and enjoy Game of Thrones, but I don’t think anyone, least of all me, was ever trying to emulate it!


Q

It seems that in your Saxon stories, Uhtred and most everyone else refers to the Roman Empire as a thing of the past.

Do they not know the empire is still around during their time? I wonder if even Alfred would have been ignorant of the enduring Roman empire.

Daniel

A

No, they don’t know. They’re aware of Rome and the Pope (Alfred visited Rome), but beyond that? It’s a mystery


Q

Again yet another great story, just afraid that we seem to be getting towards the end and since the magic of ice spittle Uhtred is in top form. Please, please tell me there is more than a book or two left. I know the story must have an end since at the start it has been clear it is about the making of England, and yes we all want Uhtred back in Bebbenburg clutching his sword as he takes his last breath, there is though a long time before that needs to occur. This storey felt like he had been refreshed the magic might have worked wonders, who says that it has not had further effects than anybody first thought possible? Pleas keep the stories rolling they only last a few days at most but i always re-read the full catalog before the new one is published, so at least a month is taken up in anticipation.

Ohh when can we expect the next installement (just please don't tell me it s the last!) March 16????

Christian

 

I do hope we are going to see Uhtred recapture Bebbanburg. Will there be number 10 In the series??

Terry Bridle

 

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I don't know if you realise this, but I was 61 years old last week !  Although my sword arm is still good and my new hip re-surfacing has made taking my place in a shield wall much more comfortable, I am a bit worried; that should your next novel be a long time in the making. I may not be able to help Uhtred re-take Bebbanberg.   Bearing in mind that I have accompanied Uhtred right from the start, (even though I'm a Welshman) I think it only right that I am there to take my place in the shield wall beside him, when we finally re-take his rightful inheritance. So please, spare no time and get cracking with the next novel.

Your humble servant

Gwyn Mowll

A

I am working on the next book of the series now!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

first of all I would like to express my gratitude for your work - especially the Saxon Chronicles which I adore. Uhtred is my hero and I love him. He is so complex and charismatic that he made millions of people crazy about him all over the world ;) I have a question regarding him being played by Alexander Dreymon. In the tv series Uhtred has dark hair. In your books you underlined many times that he has norse looks - fair, long hair which made him look like Dane. You actually make it very clear how Uhtred looks like.  I wonder why the TV series Last Kingdom make up artist made Uthred have dark hair? Also the mustache looks like from a different epoch - to me quite a 18-th stylization.  Did they consult you on the way characters look like? Or didn't you have any influence over it? Thank you for your answer.

Patrycja

 

I am really enjoying the Saxon Series of novels. Thank you for them. I love historical novels and who better to write them than Mr Cornwell?

Having recently become aware of the "The Last Kingdom" series by the BBC and have had a look at a couple of trailers. The one thing that concerns me is that Uhtred on television has dark hair while Uhtred in your books has long blond hair and, as such is easily mistaken for a Dane.

This surprises (bothers) me as I thought they would stick more closely to the images of the character you painted in your stories.

Interested in your feedback.

Peter

A

No they did not consult me - but many Danes have dark hair!


Q

Dear Bernard,

Sorry to say this Bernard, but on page 272 of Warriors of the Storm you say that, " my son took a score of men who hacked the bushes down and dragged them back to make a barricade." He couldn't have done because, Uhtred junior had been sent by Uhtred to Lady Aethelflaed to get help and hadn't returned. I think you meant to say Finan, or someone else. It's easily done, but I thought I'd better warn you. Otherwise, I've been thrilled by the storytelling in the nine books of the formerly called Warrior series, as I have been with all your books - I'm a devoted reader of yours!

Colin Spear

 

Hi Bernard!

Have just finished reading 'Warriors of the Storm', which was an enjoyable read as have been the rest of the series. I'm not sure if an error has crept in though... on page 272 Uhtred says that in order to protect the entrance to the old Roman fort 'my son took a score of men who hacked the bushes down and dragged them back to make a barricade'. On page 277 Uhtred's son is one of three horsemen who came from 'the northern trees', and, on page 278, Uhtred's son tells his father 'You were easy to find'. Presumably Uhtred's son can't be in two places at the same time, so is this a mistake or am I misunderstanding the situation?

At the end of the book, you imply that Uhtred's next move will be north to try and retake Bebbanburg. Does that mean that the next book is likely to be the last in the series, after all Uhtred is getting old now!?

Thank you for writing books that are such enjoyable reading. I think I have read very nearly all of them. I do think that the 'Grail Quest' series are the best you have written (I believe that I read somewhere that they are your favourites). The only book I didn't like was 'Stonehenge', which I have to admit I did find boring, and couldn't bring myself to finish - maybe I missed out on something!?

I hope this feedback is of interest to you. Keep up the good work!

Best regards

John Blanning

A

Oh dear, that looks as if a piece of the first draft ended up unrevised in the second draft. Oooops.

Nope! I don’t know where the next chapter is going, let alone the book or the series, but he still has a long way to go!

 


Q

Thanks for the latest Uhtred I knocked it back in one go as usual.

Whats Next? I'm going back to Starbuck to use  like a nicotine patch until next October.

How about Lord Bathhurst for Sharpe's father?

As a member of the Scarlet Pimpernels League he qualifies  as a smuggler, I'd love to believe Sharpe's old man was a Lord. Plus it was a Lord Bathurst who built Aplsley House........nicely holistic I think.

If not are we looking for a pepole smuggler?

Michael Davidson

 

A

Sorry, no!

No.


Q

Hi Bernard!

I have just finished re reading the first 8 Uhtred books to prep me for number 9 (which I have just purchased!), and that reminded me of the tv series. I have just watched the first two episodes and I have to say I am very impressed; so far, so good!

I had one question and was hoping you could offer insight, back when the tv series was announced they said it would be one episode of 60 minutes per book. I remember being horrified at the time because so much of the intricacy must be lost to whittle it down to one hour per book. Fortunately upon seeing the first two episodes it would seem that this is definitely not the case.

I was just wondering if you have any idea which books the first series comprises of, and will there be future series? I don't know what would be worse, 8 books crammed into 8 hours, or Uhtred's story left unfinished!

Please keep up the great writing, I never tire of your work and cant wait to get stuck into Warriors of the Storm.

Thankyou very much for your time

Corey (from Hexham, Northumbria!)

A

Oh no!  I don't remember anyone saying that!  The first season (8 episodes) will be based on the first two books of the series, The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman.  Hope you'll enjoy it!


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Warriors of the Storm arrived on our Kindles soon after midnight yesterday on the 8th.  My wife finished it with 24 hours, but I finished it a whole 12 hours later today.  We both really enjoyed it - Uhtred is in my opinion your greatest creation, and this story is a delight, with some great set pieces and a very satisfying final scene.  Except for the fact that it's finished and I want to know what happens next!  You must get completely fed up with fans like us - when is volume 10 coming out, and any idea of a title please?

David Terrar

(p.s. delighted that you just answered a questioner telling them The Last kingdom starts on BBC2 in the UK on 22 October at 9pm -  that's the first time it's been announced anywhere as far as I can tell!)

 

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Warriors of the Storm is an absolute blast, read it in one go and going to do so again after my girlfriend read it! Then we're going to watch the Last Kingdom. Great times!

Can't wait for the next book, any idea when Uhtred will attend to his northern business?

Floris

 

 

A

Too soon to know!!

Hope you enjoy The Last Kingdom tv series!


Q

Hello, Mr, Cornwell

you are by far my favorite author and I am so pleased to be able to thank you for all you work. They have been a huge inspiration in helping me to decide what to do with my education.... So thank you. I was just wondering if you had to say in which book do you think Uhtred is in his prime as a warrior and a commander. Once again thank you for all the amazing work.

Jonathan Elliott

 

A

The next one? I’ve never thought about it . . . he’s usually lucky to escape the consequences of his own mistakes. But the campaign against Beamfleot was pretty good!

 


Q

Hello Mister Bernard!

First I would like to thank you for all the books you have written, and have awakened in me a strong desire to always learn more about history and enjoy much more a book than any other form of entertainment.

Second I apologize to be sending this message through Google translator, because despite having a very large vontate to meet England my English is not good enough to send an e-mail.

I wonder if you ever think about doing more stories about Thomas, because of all the characters he was what I liked best and most identified myself though love Uhtred.

And other doubts about Jeanette at the end of the second book we take to understand that she will rescue his son, but then we do not have that certainty, she can recover her son and restore her life?

Thank you very much for everything and giving us emotions every day, I hope you come here to Brazil soon.

Greetings from your big fan Lucas Ferrari

A

Oh I wrote those books so long ago now I can't quite remember - but I'm fairly certain she does succeed in rescuing her son.


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Hi Bernard,

In your research for the Uhtred books I am sure you have come across the "Middleton Cross". I went to look at it yesterday and with its curious cultural blend Pagan and Christian symbolism it stuck me it could easily have been commissioned by some real life Uhtred !

Paul Stein

A

Seems to have been carved by someone making a bet on every runner in the race! I think Uhtred would have stuck to the pagan symbols only.


Q

Hello do you know when the Last Kingdom will be aired in the UK yet? I am really looking forward to it.

Regards

Helen Powell

 

I would just like to start by saying how much joy your books have brought me whilst away in Afghan with the British Army and many other places over the world. I have just found out whilst looking for the next Uhtred novel that "The Last Kingdom" will be aired on BBC America this October. Do you know if this will eventually be shown on the BBC in the UK?

Dewi

 

Have read everything you've published!  Enjoyed the lot!  Thanks - just found out that BBC America have made a film of the Last Kingdom - do you have any info on when it will be shown on UK TV?

Mike Claridge

 

I have read that The Last Kingdom has been made into  TV series by BBC America --  are we likely to see this on British TV any time soon ?

Alan Thompson

 

Hi, I'm a long term fan who has recently got back into reading your novels.  I'm reading the Saxon tales at the moment as I had only read the 1st 3 in the past.  I love them and am now looking forward to the TV show. It's a real shame I can't find a release date for the show in the UK though.  I'm going to be gutted if my American friends get to see it first, especially after I raved about how good it should be!

Marie

 

I was greatly interested to learn that The Last Kingdom is to hit the screen soon. As a UK resident I would like to know if and when the BBC will be showing the series as I cannot find any trace yet on iPlayer? My entire family is working its way through your Warrior Chronicles and some day soon I will go to Bamburgh which looks delightful. Thank you for taking such an interesting slant on Anglo Saxon history; I find it much easier to learn it now I can imagine your likeable but brutal hero dissing the Christian obsession with saints' bones and relics......Sometimes I wish he would have fought for the Danes instead!

Michaela Davies

A

Although we do know the start date for the showing of the TV series The Last Kingdom in American (10 October on BBC America), we do not yet have a confirmed date for the UK.  However, there are some new videos available for viewing here:  http://www.bbcamerica.com/the-last-kingdom/

We will post the UK date as soon as we learn it!


Q

My husband and I great fans of your work (along with half the known universe!). While patiently waiting for the release of  'Warriors of the Storm', we have been reading your other books, which, I can report, are also excellent. We are reading Azincourt at the moment and Waterloo will follow. We really do miss Uhtred, though. He's become like an absent family member to us and we talk about him all the time.  Although the young man who plays Uhtred in the TV series looks very handsome and macho, can you please tell me why you didn't insist he must have fair hair like our beloved hero? Uhtred's long, fair hair is mentioned so many times in your books.  I will give the TV series a chance, of course, but how can someone so dark possibly be Uhtred?.  Please keep writing more.  You truly are a master.

Regards,

Irene.

 

A

It’s not my job to insist on anything! I suppose I could have made demands, but that’s not a very sensible thing to do when a TV producer is eager to make a programme…any demand from me is liable to be an obstacle and so not helpful. Yes, Alexander’s hair colour is different, but I’m not a casting director and I have to assume (and do) that they are the experts and they will find the best actor for the role. Which I think they have! Alexander’s performance is wonderful! Sharpe’s hair colour was different in the TV series too, but I don’t think anyone would have wanted any actor other than Sean Bean to play Sharpe. Inevitably a TV or film defines a character more precisely than the book, but I’m okay with that. My hope is that Alexander will own the part and influence the way I depict Uhtred! Besides, in the end he’ll go grey, poor bastard!


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I've just re read Harlequin. What a character Sir Simon Jekyll is! He should have his own book. An English knight, winner of European tournaments who can't even afford proper armour. A man who is kicked around by fate, has his head kicked in by the social hierarchy and has his dignity scoffed by a selfish brat. Yes, he is a stupid pig bastard, but what a book he'd make! Ever been tempted to have a villainous main character? And a truly villainous one, not like Sharpe or Uhtred.

Thanks,

James Trethowan.

A

Sharpe and Uhtred are both villains, they’re just our villains! I like your idea . . . .

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I'm writing from Germany and have just finished The Empty Throne some minutes ago. I really love the stories about Uthred and can't wait for the next book to be published. Some time ago I heard that the seventh book was meant to be last. Fortunately is was not. As I read the end it was obvios that there was coming another one. So my question is, how many books are going to be published, until Uhtred will finally conquer back his inheritance Bebbanburg?

I'm looking forward to receiving your answer.

Sincerely yours,

Stephan Neukamm

A

I don't know how many more....but the next book will be Warriors of the Storm and will be published in the UK in October (next January for US publication).


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

A friend and I are reading The Saxon Stories, and she has this idea that Uhtred patronizes whores on a regular basis. Her premise is the paragraph where Uhtred says he wants nothing more than a bed, ale, and a whore. I argued that Uhtred is incredibly open about his behavior. I don't think he would take whores to bed regularly and not tell us about at least one of them. Can you help us settle this argument?

Best,

Michael

A

He’s not very discriminating, on the whole, and he does love women. I’m not sure he patronizes whores regularly, but he certainly doesn’t despise them. He’s a good man!

 


Q

Hello.

My Uncle gave me my first Sharpe book back in '95 then you arrived at the WH Smith I was working at in Guildford (1998) to do a signing. I ,however, was left pushing visitors around and unnable to meet you! A few months later I was thanked by John Major for doing the same thing and given a signed copy of his book, which dissapeared, mysteriously!

I have been a loyal fan of Sharpe and Uhtred for twenty years now and I am champing at the bit for Uhtred's next adventure but what are the chances of Sandman coming back?

I moved to Argentina almost 9 years ago and live in a town called El Bolsón. I was lucky enough to travel the 5 hours to Valdivia and Niebla in Chile and see some of the ruined forts you write about in Sharpe's Devil and even though niether my wife nor our friends could comprehend my excitement, I have spent the last three years talking about it.

Thank you for such amazing stories and making us squirm with both pain and anguish at the exploits of our favourite heroes!

Don't stop!

Nick

A

Sorry, no plans for a return of Sandman at this time!


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Thank you for taking the time to answer your fans’ questions. When I was 15, I saw a new book called The Winter King at a King Arthur exhibit. You quickly became my favorite author after that. Half a lifetime later, I wear a Thor hammer and have a baby named Ragnar. I have imparted Uhtred’s wisdom to Ragnar about the five things that make a man happy: “a good ship, a good sword, a good hound, a good horse, and a woman.” My wife laughs whenever I tell him that. I was wondering if there any scenes in particular that you’re looking forward to being depicted on The Last Kingdom TV show? And any chance you make a cameo in the show?

Earl R, South Korea

A

I’m not making a cameo! I’m looking forward to the whole thing… as yet we haven’t seen any of it, but soon!


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

I see you are publishing 9th book in the series in October.  Uhtred must be getting long in his tooth by now.  Can you tell me how many more to come?  I have books 1-7 in first edition but missed out on Empty Throne as it was published sooner than I had expected.  Can you give me a hint as to who specialises in your books so I can get a first print?

Thank you

Yours sincerely

Keith Wells

A

I don't know how many more???

Goldsboro Books in London is a good place for first edition books: https://www.goldsborobooks.com/

 

 


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Hello Bernard!

I notice that in your novels characters often slip and fall in the middle of a fight. Especially Uhtred and Sharpe. There'll be some junk or other hazard around and they'll trip! Have you noticed this? Someone ought to explain to them that it's not safe engage in physical activity in a cluttered area. Someone could get hurt!

Thanks so much for writing all these great books. They've been a joy to read! I've even learned a thing or two about history.

-Ban Marks, from sunny California

A

You’re so right. Health and Safety would be rightly concerned and undoubtedly issue on-the-spot fines. Tripping must have been a real hazard, especially to men wearing visored helmets. I suspect Alfred’s victory at Aesc’s Hill was really brought about by the enemy falling into the ditch, and surely most of the French men-at-arms at Agincourt must have tripped on the casualties from the front rank

 


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The last three Uhtred novels included maps with the modern border between Scotland and England rather than the actual 9th c. Northumbrian border shown in the earlier books. Was this a deliberate anachronism, I wonder, or an editorial oversight?

Alex McLeish

 

A

Probably carelessness . . . . I suspect the frontier was fairly vague (except where it coincided with a river) so it’s always slightly guesswork

 


Q

Bernard,

firstly just to say how thoroughly enjoyable the Saxon stories have been I'm totally hooked and engrossed with Uhtred. I have a question of some historical significance and not sure if you'll be able to answer it. I was born and raised in Brackenwood on the Wirral peninsula in England. I was intrigued in the Empty throne with references to Brombrough and Chester and wondered if Brackenwood was the supposed site of the battle of Brunanburh? I know there is much dispute about it but wondered what historical info you researched about it so I can make my own enquiries. Anyway hope you can help. Keep up the fantastic creativity and ideas. Your books are compelling :)

Geoff

A

I’m not sure about Brackenwood – it seems probable that the site of the battle is now a golf course! There’s going to be endless argument about where the site is, but I’m persuaded by Michael Livingston’s conclusions in his book The Battle of Brunanburh, a Casebook (Exeter University Press, 2011)  and I’d recommend reading that!

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell!

I notice that Uhtred should be around 80 years old by the time the Battle of Brunanburh rolls around? It might seem a bit far-fetched, but i wonder if he'll still be fighting in the front rank when the shield walls meet even then? I wouldn't put it past the stubborn old fool!

In order to make sure he makes in through okay, you'll just have to make sure he takes after another 80 year old fellow i just saw on youtube. He set the world record in his age category with a bench press of 335 lbs! At 80! Maybe even Uhtred can't beat that...

Regardless, i'm sure it'll be a great story like most everything else i've read by you. Thanks for reading!

Vinny S.

A

I’d like to think Uhtred lived long enough to see Brunanburh, but I’m still not certain of that. The series will, though.

 


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I was just getting over the Sharpe's father obsession when somebody suggested John the Painter! I confess I'd never heard of him but when you look him up what a fascinating character.

Anyway here goes...

Lord North, the PM credited with giving the American colonies away must have been under all sorts of pressure at the time and I'm sure he could have taken solace in the brothels around Howick Place?

Please throw us a bone if I'm wrong a tiny clue would be appreciated.

Only three months to go till the new Uhtred book I'M SOOOOO EXCITED!!!!!!!!!!

Mike Davidson

A

Oh god, a bone? I’ve chucked a whole skeleton into the mix already!


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Hi Bernard,

I notice in your comments that you confirm Uhtred’s story will end with the Battle of Brunanburh. That has caused me much satisfaction since immediately after “The Last Kingdom” came out I announced to all who would listen that the natural end of this tale would be that epic battle. I reasoned that even though Uhtred would be too old to participate he could still be around to witness it. I even suggested he could have a son who could do that for him.

 

Needless to say I have watched the narrative unroll with Uhtred the Younger immerging as a candidate for a part in the final encounter. No doubt he will also play a key role in helping Uhtred achieve his life’s dream.

 

Talking of off-spring brings me to my question/observation. As the story has unfurled you have introduced us to the next generation of nearly all the key players – both historical and fictional. We have met the sons (& daughters) of Cnut, Sigurd, Ivar, Kjartan, King Constantine , Alfred  & Edward, Aethelflaed, Aelfric & Uhtred’s cousin.

BUT.

What about Finan? He has a wife and an ambition to return home and settle scores of his own. Has he no son who, like Uhtred’s, can follow in his footsteps and help him in his quest?

 

Then there is Stiorra. Although she is fictional I have assumed the Sygtryggr she left with in The Empty Throne is the historical Hiberno-Norse Sygtryggr Caoch [ “One eyed”] whom Uhtred has clearly helped to get his name!  In which case there are sons who become Kings, in particular Sygtryggr Sygtryggrson (Cuaran) who not only becomes King of York but returns to Dublin to set up a dynasty there. With Stiorra as his mother he would inherit some of Uhtred’s genes which would explain his successful career!

 

I really do admire the way you have blended historical and fictional characters to create such plausible and entertaining reading. Thanks !!

 

Paul Stein

A

Wait for the next book!

I confess I’ve been ‘imaginative’ with Sygtryggr…and probably face a small dilemma on how to reconcile the imagination with reality. Still, he’s in the next book too!

 


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Hello Mr. Cornwell,

My name is Joe Hammer, and first I wanted to say thank you for writing such a wonderful series that is The Saxon Stories.  Uhtred, and the rest of the cast with every novel, is so well thought-out, and your ability to tell such an engaging narrative while being historically accurate is nothing short of astonishing.  I recently finished The Burning Land, and had one question for you.

 

The death of Gisela was a gut punch, to be sure.  You captured Uhtred's initial torment extremely well - we had known her since book three after all!  I was curious why you did not include her funeral?  That seemed like it would've been an interesting way to display pagan culture with burials.  I'm just asking because I was a big fan of Gisela, and since Uhtred obviously loved her deeply, it was curious (to me) that her funeral was left out of the narrative.

 

Again, I can't get enough of this series, it is truly amazing.  Thank you for writing such outstanding novels and I can't wait to read the next Uthred tale!

--Joe Hammer

A

I suppose because telling of the funeral wouldn’t have advanced the story, that’s all I can suppose! If it had relevance it would have been there.


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Dear Mr Cornwell.

I have all your 'Saxon Story' novels having initially thought that I was buying into a trilogy,but now have to keep going to find out how Uhtred ends up in 'Bebbanburg' as an old man.

Anyway, earlier this year I read and enjoyed The Empty Throne and have just returned from a holiday in the St Davids area of Pembrokeshire. Could you tell me, did you base the island with the rock arch and the anchorage of the Dragon's mouth on actual places. I'd be interested to know.

Many thanks

Nick

 

A

The ‘Dragon’s Mouth’ is Solva…just to the east of St David’s


Q

I am a big fan of your work. I've read all the books that have been published here in Brazil and I'm crazy waiting for the new book about Uhtred.

I wanted to know how many books the series will have?

And then I wondered, when you're done on it what are you going to write about?

Because Arthur was the Saxon Age and the celtics.

Uhtred was about the Danish invasions.

With Thomas was the Hundred Years War.

The next series will be on the Norman invasions?

William the Conqueror?

I do not know, just wondering.

Carolina Batista

A

I do not know either!  But I don't have plans for the Norman invasion or William the Conqueror....


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Hi Bernard -

I've really enjoyed your books (and boring me wife and anyone else who will listen) by sharing snippets of historical information from your wonderful stories.  My particular favourites have been the Uhtred Saxon/Viking stories.  I just wanted to know if you have decided how this tale will end?  We have obviously had a glimpse of an old Uhtred back in Bebbanburg, his rightful home, but is his tale nearly over?  I feel I need to prepare myself for the inevitable end!  Keep up the great work!

Andrew Murray-Smith

 

A

It isn’t over! Not by a long way!


Q

Dear Mr Cornweill

I am a researcher on Epic and I am writing (in french) a paper about "The warriior Chronicles" for tthe" Mélanges Danielle Buschinger"  (she is a well known researcher, professeure émérite de l'université d'Amiens about Alt Deutsch and Wagner). I think that Uhtred in an heros opposite to Siegfried ; but I am looking for something you are going to explain in the next book I will read en october. Uhtred has been announced his daughter Stiorra would be " a mother of kings" and in the time he is writing (or dictating ?, I hope you will precise) he said the prophety had come true. I though first Stiorra was going to be a grand-grand mother of William the Conqueror but Uhtred can't live long enough to see it. I have not found legitimate candidates for her royal descendance ; perhaps  in Ireland in a little kingdom??? Iam waiting for the next book ; I Know that Athelstan is going to meet Anlaf (the son of Stiorra??) disguised as a harper exactly like Alfred going out of the marches of Somerset to see by himself his enemies I do love all your books but I think this serie is the best one ; I hope  we can see very soon the fist story on TV.

I have seen the serie Sharpe on DVD and I hope iThe Uhtred serie is going to be as good as that one

Sincerely yours

Isabelle Weill-Bréchot-Burls

 

A

Stiorra is fictional! You’re on the right track, of course, but she is fictional which means, inevitably, her children are as well! Sorry!


Q

Mr. Cornwell-

Thank you so much for all the pleasure you have brought to me through Uhtred and The Saxon Tales. I have read them several times and am slowly reading The Empty Throne (because I don't want it to end...but now that I've learned about Warriors of the Storm, I can read it in earnest now!) I hope there are more planned...even if the story has to continue with Uhtred Uhtredson rather than Uhtred Ragnarsson.

I'm curious, is there anything about Uhtred's story that would surprise the Bernard Cornwell who sat down to write The Last Kingdom? Had you planned 9 (and hopefully counting!) stories out?

Jamie McKee

A

What a good question! I can’t think of anything particularly. He surprises me all the time (I’m glad to say) but usually by the choices he makes. I hadn’t planned any number, I can’t plan a single book, let alone a series, and there will certainly be more than nine!


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell, are you fine?

My name is Vitor,  I'm from Brazil, and I would like your help if possible.

First of all, thank you very much for the Warrior Chronicles, I've just finished reading the second book and I can't wait to read the next one!

Anyway,  I'm creating a swordplay group in Brazil basedin the Danish culture. However, we don't have much material to research in this area, specially in portuguese.

The name of the group was based in the name that Uhtred and Leofric gave to their boat, "Fyrdraca". My friends and I thought that this name would certainly fit with the group's culture basis, but when I made some research on the name (specially in English), I've found that this name comes from the old English itself. On the other hand,  there is a viking ship with the same name in the USA, if I'm not mistaken.

In a nutshell, what is the etymology of the name Fyrdraca?

And I would also ask you that if you could send us some research on the well known vikings, to use as material to proceed the group foundation in a real story. And, if you couldn't,  to lead us to a researcher in this area,  if you know him/her.

Anyway, thank you very much for the attention and for your books, and sorry for any mistakes that I probably made, I still have a lot to learn with the English language

Att.

Vitor Oliveira Lima

A

I wish I knew, sorry! I took the name from an Old English dictionary which, alas, offers no etymologies. Presumably it goes (like everything else) back to Old High German


Q

Dear Bernard,

I am a huge fan, have read your books - more than once, they give me immense enjoyment and have helped me through some difficult times.  Absolutely love the dark ages stories, started off with the Arthur books then moved onto the Saxon stories, Your mixture of fact and fiction is perfect. I particularly like the way you describe your characters and their settings, Interested to know your thoughts on the casting for the upcoming BBC Last Kingdom particularly Uhtred, hope you had a say in the casting?

Appreciate you must be overwhelmed with fans request so completely understand if you don't respond.

All the very best

Simon

A

I had no say in it, and I didn’t want to have a say in it, and it would have been extremely foolish of the producers to even suggest that I might have a say in it! Casting is a skilled business and I have no skill in it! I haven’t seen any of the programmes yet so can’t give you an opinion, but I have enormous faith in the producers so I suspect I’ll be more than happy with their choice!

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have been an avid reader of yours for a great many years having read the Warlord Chronicles, all of the Uhtred of Bebbanburg series, and many of the Sharpe stories. I recently reread the Warlord Chronicles for maybe the 5th time and I noticed the references to the Song of Beli Mawr throughout all 3 books. I was wondering, as a fan and ancestral Welshman, if there are actual standard lyrics to the Song of Beli Mawr?

Sincerely,

Charles Mckay

A

I'm afraid the war song of Beli Mawr is totally my invention.


Q

I enjoy reading your books over and over whether it's Sharpe, Starbuck, Uhtred, the Warlord Chronicles or The Fort, for that I thank you.

Have you ever thought about writing about the Black Brunswickers from their foundation in 1809 by Duke Friedrich Wilhelm for the Austrians to Waterloo?

Theo Judd

A

The short answer? No.  I suspect I’d need to learn German to do justice to the subject and that’s probably not going to happen.

 


Q

Hi

I just wanted to write to say I love the Uhtred books, I have easily read them front to back 4 or 5 times. I used to do historical re-enactment and I love your flair for historical accuracy, although when you let the characters off the leash of battle it is also highly entertaining, especially Uhtred.

I was so happy to hear the last Kingdom is getting a tv show, it was the first book of yours I read and I am really looking forward to the show, is there any word on when it will be out?

Regards

Thomas Shannly

A

We don't know yet, but keep an eye on the homepage of this website.  We'll post the information as soon as we receive it!


Q

I would just like to say that since reading your Sharpe series and Waterloo I have crammed my bookshelves with your works. Can't wait for your next Uhtred epic! But do you intend to write any more on the English and Welsh archers? Your account of crecy and azincourt has left me craving more tales of these amazing men. If only Wellington had a few battalions at his disposal! Thank you for the pleasure your writing has given me.

Lee Mercer

A

I don't know....maybe??


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Just finished Waterloo . Absolutely wonderful . Have read all of your novels and am rereading Sharpe from stem to stern encouraged by the detail in Waterloo .

Have read all of Patrick O'Brians books for the Naval flavor of the period which further argues for the reread .

In light of some of the silly historical mistakes written about the Crusades , wish you would bring Uhtred's great(x?) grandson to the Mideast and tell the world the truth about that period .Thanks for writing !!

Len Ingram    MAJ/USMC(RET)

A

I don't have plans to write about the Crusades.


Q

Good evening,

I am a massive fan of your books. When I finished reading the Sharpe series, I started reading your books about Uthred (A complete oaf and never fails to make me laugh). I just wondered if you have any future books in the pipeline for the Sharpe series or Uhtred?

Many thanks for your time and I wish you all the best all in your future work.

Richard.

A

Yes for Uhtred (soon!).  Sharpe is still a few years away.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell

After reading the excellent Uhtred books .We had to make the ( 800mile) round trip to Bamburgh castle . The views were stunning , then we  invaded Lindesfarne ( a must) . It really brought the books to life . Little wonder why they were fought so hard to keep .

When will the next installment going to hit the bookshelves ?

regards

Dane Clarke

 

 

I've just finished reading "The Empty Throne" and thoroughly enjoyed it, as I have enjoyed all your other books.

What lies ahead for Uhtred? Will there be another book? And when, if known?

Best wishes,

David

 

 

When is the book out in the UK.  very excited for next episode in the series

Peter Murrie

A

The next book of the Warrior Chronicles/Saxon stories will be Warriors of the Storm.  We hope it will be available in October!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

When will you be releasing Uhtred's next novel in the United States?  Really looking forward to reading it as I have thoroughly enjoyed all the others.  Also, Waterloo is a wonderfully told story.  Excellent work!

Joshua Kershner

A

The next book, Warriors of the Storm, will likely be published in the US in January 2016.


Q

Dear Bernard,

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading about Uhtred, and learning about saxon England.  What a bloodthirsty and barbaric time it was!  But your story-telling is superb.  I have read all the books in order, and have just finished 'The Empty Throne'.  I'd like to know if that truly is the end - or just as far as you've got.  Will there be any more books in the series? Uhtred mentions more than once that he survives to become an old man.  So what happens to him, and to his son, to Finan, to Aethelflaed, and all the others?  I know I could Google the history, I could find out from the historians and the many books that have been written - but it's not the same as reading your books!  Anyway, if you haven't done so already, please write the next one!  And the one after that, and the one after that....  sorry!

Thank you so much, also, for all the pleasure you've given me through your writing.

With best wishes,

Rory

A

I am writing the next one now!  It will be called Warriors of the Storm.


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Is it possible, that the Warrior Chronicles will go on after the death of Uhtred, with Uhtred the younger becoming the main character?

Thank you for your answer, and best wishes,

Telek Gergely

A

The Chronicles will end at the Battle of Brunanburh, and will not go beyond!

 


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Q

Good morning, Mr. Cornwell.

I was just wondering: "Warriors of Darkness" is the 9th book of Uhtred's series or it's just a short story featuring him?

Great hug from Brazil

Vagner Stefanello

A

The next book will be the 9th book of the series - it is not a short story.


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Q

I saw that Uhtred's story is being filmed as a TV series and I'm curious to find out how it ends since the book series still haven't taken us back to Bebbanburg. Will the final book in the series come out prior to the TV series? I hope so.

Ramzi Najjar

Beirut, Lebanon

A

The next book will be out, but it is not the final one of the series.


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Q

Hello there!

I am a big fan of yours and have been for many years. I am also a Primary school teacher in England and we now have a new curriculum for history with a unit 'Vikings v Anglo-Saxons'. (Maybe Mr. Gove is also a fan?) Anyhow, I have been sorely tempted to read parts Uhtred's adventures to Year 6 - it would certainly bring it alive for them! Have you or your publishers ever considered bringing out an edited version for children?

Thank-you for many, many happy hours of reading and listening via the audiobooks.

Cath Luckham

A

We’ve never considered it! It’s really not a bad idea, but lord only knows where I’d find the time to do all the editing. Still, I’ll think about it, and thank you!

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

Just finished the Empty Throne and thought that this was the best yet with Uhtred the hero once more. I did not see the end coming, wonderful.  You have a gift for sure and I look forward to many more books as diverse as you like but I do wonder if the young Uhtred may replace his father as he ages or you may do an Alan a Dale from Angus Donald and relate stories from his Uhtred's youth? Thanks for some epic reading,

Pete McG.

 

A

I’m not sure, is the answer! It’s certainly a possibility, but I think I’ll just have to wait and see how the series turns out!


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Q

Bernard,

I loved how you did the Saxons,Jutes,& Angels,in your Arthur series,& how you write Uhtred,any chance that you will do a novel or 3 from the Saxons viewpoint as they came to Britain?

Cheers

Wayne

 

A

I’ve thought about doing that, but so far haven’t found the time! Maybe one day?

 


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell:

I am nearing my eightieth year...please tell me that Lord Uhtred will soon be heading to Northumberland to retake Bamburgh Castle from his uncle.  No pressure, but time is flying.....Blessings to you and yours.

Phyllis Dand

A

I hope to be finished writing the next book in the series soon!


Q

Dear Bernard,

Just a quick thank you for all your work down the years. I think I've probably read everything you've ever published, and more importantly, enjoyed every last second of it. Your love of history is palpable, and combined with your obvious emotional intelligence and wit, makes for wonderful narration. I have yet to read your Waterloo book (it's in my queue!) but absolutely love the fact you've ventured into non-fiction. Your research has always been immaculate for fiction so it makes sense that you've made the stride into non-fiction!

I would love to see you venture into the world of non-fiction again, have you got any plans to do this?

Thoroughly looking forward to Uhtred's next story and I love how you can trace your lineage back to these times! Furthest my dad could get back was to a bunch of farmers in Gloucestershire in the 1500s, what else would you expect with a surname like Bullock!!

Anyway I'm rambling now, thank you again for everything.

Very best wishes,

a dear fan, Marcus Bullock

A

I don't!  I think this may well be my only non-fiction book!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Your Saxon Stories have really made me curious as to how Anglo-Saxons, and in particular Alfred the Great himself, have looked upon the heritage of their Roman predecessors. While you write about Uhtred wondering on how the Romans had been able to build magnificent stone buildings, walls, roads etc. I have started to wonder if this thinking about the Roman past is just something you assumed they probably might have done or if you have any sources that show that they actually did?

Gijs den Braven

A

They talk about it in their poetry! In ‘The Wanderer’, a famous Old English poem, the poet laments the ruins ‘how terrible it will be when all the wealth of this world lies waste, as now throughout this middle earth walls stand blown by the wind, frost-covered, storm swept, the halls decay’.  Remember they’re surrounded by the ruins of Roman civilization, so of course they must wonder how those amazing structures were built. It’s a post-apocalyptic world and some thought they were slipping back into barbaric darkness.

 


Q

B

Love all your books, particularly The Saxon Chronicles. Is there another book planned following "The Empty Throne?"   Thanks

Tony Venditti

 

G'Day Bernard,

Have just finished book 8, The Empty Throne. I'm certain many others have have enjoyed reading about Uhtred and would like to see him eventually winning back Bebbanburg Castle. Do you intend continuing the series? But regardless, congratulations for producing such great reads.

Best regards, Phil

FYI: I read your books on a Kindle and unlike so many other authors Kindle books, the printing, grammatical errors etc. in yours are practically non existent.

 

 

I have only just discovered your Viking and Saxon novels and just adore them. I have almost finished the empty throne, and wondering if you will continue with this series . I think you are a wonderful writer, and  I smile so much  at Uhtred ...I love his character even though I personally  do believe in the nailed god.. and I am a descendent of Alfred .Thank you very much...

Leonie

 

 

A

I am writing the next book of the series now!


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Q

I cannot find a list and descriptions for all your characters in the Saxon Tales. After eight books I can't be the only one getting confused. Can you help me?

 

Also Uhtred's lifelong dream of taking back Bebbanburg seems to have been forgotten in 'The Empty Throne', why?

Sean Cunningham

A

We are considering putting a list in a future book . . . . I hope it helps if we do!

It wasn’t forgotten . . . it was mentioned . . . but the recapture is still in the future!


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Q

What would have Thor's hammer amulet, that Uhtred would have worn be like.

Ive read and re read parts to find out.

But do you have a sort of  idea of its. picture.

Thank you.

Gwen Penny

A

You’ll find a good picture (and discussion) here: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/31199


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I greatly enjoy Uhtred's story and hope that you are able to continue it for many books through to its logical conclusion at the Battle of Brunaburh, by which time Uhtred will be 80 years of age.

However, it is now nearly a decade since you completed your last Sharpe book and Richard Sharpe will probably be the character to whom you will be most closely linked.

So when can we hope to read more of Richard Sharpe?

Dan McGarry

 

Dear Sir,

I am happy to have been a reader of all of your novels depicting the Sharpe's saga.  When I could not find them in the Italian version, I bought the original books in English. I was fascinated by your skill in mixing the historical truth (actually, impeccable) with the fantasy of Sharpe's adventures. My last purchase was, of course, Waterloo; but: may we expect something more on the Sharpe's saga, or that's the end?

Please accept my warmest regards and compliments.

Emilio Macchi Alfieri

A

I hope there will be another Sharpe, not sure when tho'!


Q

Hello sir.

I would like to start off by saying that I have been an avid follower of your work since Sharpe's Rifles first aired on U.S. PBS here in Canada. I have  read all the Sharpe's  books, Grail quest, Arthur and of course your Saxon stories. I must say I love them all, but especially love the Uhtred and am anticipating the release of the Last Kingdom here in Canada. I have two questions; What happened to Steapa, I do not remember him being mentioned in The Pagan Lord or The Empty Throne; And will Brida play a part when Uhtred comes north with Aethelstan? Thank you for your indulgence.

Steven Woodings

 

A

I think we will see Steapa again...and Brida!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I have to start by saying how much I love your style of writing. I have binged through all of your medieval story lines and have been fascinated and moved by how you portray these amazing historical figures through the eyes of complex and interesting characters. The Saxon series has been absolutely amazing so far and I'm very excited to see how well BBC can pull off Uhtred's story. With all that being said, I was wondering if you would ever consider telling the story of William Wallace in the same exciting way as you told King Alfred and Warlord Arthur's stories. My father and I (who both wear Thor's hammer amulet now after reading Uhtred's chronicles.. haha) have talked about how cool it would be to see a more accurate portrayal of Wallace's brutal fight for freedom. After reading historical and biographical information on Wallace, it was very disappointing to see how wrong the movie Braveheart was about him. He was a warlord! We are very proud of our Scottish heritage and we have actually traced our lineage back to a man listed as Squire Guthrie who is reported to have convinced Wallace to return from France. I really appreciate that you take the time to listen and respond to your fans. I can't wait for what you have next for us!

 

Thanks,

Taylor Guthrie

A

I honestly think a Scottish writer should tackle William Wallace.


Q

Re The Warrior Chronicles, when can we expect to see book 9?, Alas I'm 94 and I'm short on time.

Andrew Howlett-Davies

 

Hi, when is Uhtred of Bebbanburg coming back please?  thanks.great books by the way

Greg Harris

 

Any idea when the next Warrior Chronicles book will be released. I have read The Empty Throne)

Norman Murray

 

Good afternoon,

 

I have read all the volumes of the Warrior Chronicles and am enraptured by them. Will there be a final volume after "The Empty Throne"?

Thank you,

Regards, Paul

A

I am writing this book now.  We hope to see it published in the UK in October and in the US next January.


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I am a huge fan of your Saxon Tales, favorite books i have ever read. But my one issue is through all 8 books so far, I have had trouble picturing Uhtred as described in the book. In my head he is kinda looks like Aragorn from Lord of the Rings (if you've seen the movies) except taller with a wider face, and broader shoulders. Yet in the book he is blonde. If you wouldn't mind, could you please describe Uhtred's physical appearance?  Thanks a billion!

With Respect,

Neil Rubi

A

Increase Sean Bean’s size by 10%. You got him.


Q

Hello, Mr. Cornwell.

My husband and I have been greatly enjoying the Saxon Tales. I, in particular, love historical places and enjoy historical fiction. I've looked online for tours that visit locations mentioned in your book--a Cornwell or Uhtred tour if you will. Alas, I have not found a one. I wish I lived in Britain because then I would design one (or so I imagine).

Last September we took a short trip of our own devising and we visited Holy Island (saw the carving of the monks carrying St.Cuthbert), walked around the base of immense Bebbanburg (how we call Bamburgh), bits of Hadrian's Wall & Roman forts, the Cathedral at Dunham (of course, Durham, where we saw another carving of the monks carrying St Cuthbert as we walked from the hotel to the Cathedral), a very short visit to York &the Jorvik Centre. We had great fun but the driving was really so stressful. We'd still like to go south and west to visit much of Wessex, Chester, & look for that marshy area to the east of London (the name escapes me) where Uhtred led the saxons over the well protected fort of the danes. But we cannot make this circuit without a car. Alas.

I imagine with all your travels you probably have become friendly with people in the travel industry. Perhaps you might pass on my wish for a tour for Uhtred/Saxon Tales fans? What fun excursions these could be!

Thanks so much for the enjoyable reads.

All my best to you.

--theresa

A

Maybe somebody already offers such a tour? I’m afraid I don’t know the companies who do that kind of thing. Sorry!

 


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I've only just got around to reading your modern day 'Thrillers' series and I'd like to say how thoroughly enjoyable they are; I'm getting the same sense of excitement I used to get reading Hammond Innes and Desmond Bageley years ago. Can I ask if you made a conscious decision not to add to them after Scoundrel, or have other ideas since then just appealed to you more? Looking forward to more Uhtred in the autumn, and the new Elizabethan series (or whatever you decide comes next!) after that.

Best Wishes

Tony Mills

A

I simply decided I was happier writing historical novels!  But thank you for the comment!

 


Q

Hi.

I love your books, they are and have become just everything I like in a book. My favourite. is The Warrior chronicle, and obviously Uhtred But I wondered of at any time you may want to write something with Richard III?

I understand this may be a little out of your time lines. But I don't think that is really so.

I just wondered.

Looking forward to more in the story of our great warrior.

Thank you so much

Regards.

Gwyn Penny

A

Maybe???  But not any time soon.


Q

Hi, Mr Cornwell.

First, sorry for the precarious english.

I'm a huge fan of Derfel and Uhtred, but I'm not very familiarized with the Sharpe series. What do you recommend: to read the books in chronological order (starting from Sharpe's Tiger) or in publication order (starting from Sharpe's Eagle)?

I have one more question, hope you don't mind.

You created a lot of good characters. So, if you could make a list with your Top 5 favourite and beloved characters from all of your books, how would that be? Nimue would be on the list? She's my dearest character created by you. So conflicted. I love that.

Thank you.

Eilton Ribeiro

A

I recommend reading the Sharpe books in chronological order - not the order in which they were written.  Here is a link to the page of this website listing all my books by series, and the correct order in which to read each series.  You'll see the Sharpe books are listed first:

http://www.bernardcornwell.net/books-by-bernard-cornwell/

 

I’ve no idea, except Lady Grace would be there in the top five, and Ceinwyn!

 


Q

Good morning Bernard,

Just wanted to say I am a big fan of your Saxon series. I really liked what you did with "the empty throne" allowing Uhtred's son (Uhtred) a voice.

I was wanting to know if you still plan to continue on further with the Uhtred series? I have enjoyed immensely the series so far and of course I will be sad to see it end one day, but I realize you must have other interests as well.

Wishing you the best regards and health,

Mark Atkinson

 

I enjoy your books. I have been in the military for the last 11 years, and it's crazy how well you describe the feeling of battle. But, to get to my question. Is there another book on the way after The Empty Throne, with the rest of Uhtred's life and regaining Bebbanburg?

Justin Lloyd

 

I recently discovered your series The Saxon Tales and can't wait to read the  next book. I just finished The Empty Throne and look forward to the next, when do you think that might be?

Judy Byrum

A

I am writing the next book of the series now.  We hope to see it published in the UK in October and in the US next January.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I have truly enjoyed so many of your books. The Sharpe and Starbuck series were both favourites with my whole family. You recent tales of Uhtred have not disappointed! My dad bought me the most recent for Christmas, unfortunately this was my first encounter with the series, so I have now gone right back to the Last Kingdom to start again.

I did very much enjoyed Uhtred's encounter with Hywel Dda and I do hope he, or at least the Welsh make another appearance. While I was at Cardiff University I read the story of Gruffydd ap Cynan. I remember at the time thinking this would make a brilliant Cornwell series! I wonder, have you ever heard of Gruffydd? This is not a plea for you to start a new series based on Gruffydd (although if you do I will not complain) it was more to ask if you knew of him, and if not I think you'd enjoy reading about his life, Sigtrygg Silkbeard's and Magnus Barefoot's.

 

All the best,

 

Anthony

A

I have heard of Gruffydd, but whether that will transfer to any of the stories? I don't know?


Q

Hi Bernard,

I was just reading your questions section of your web page, I'm an avid reader of it and have been since the last Starbuck book so long ago. You had stated that you didn't know what book you were going to write in a response from another reader about a WW 1. Well now might be a good time to call Nate back from his long sabbatical, Please.

Now my Uhtred question, I can't think right now of which book you wrote it in but, Uhtred was with Ragnar the younger and they were near or thinking about taking Dunham, but they had met some Scotsman and his son and Uhtred stated that had he known what kind of problems they would cause he would have killed him then. Do or will you have any plans of Uthred going north and running into them again?

 

I think that would be an interesting adventure for Uthred but would still love to hear that you plan to write about Nate next, I think I'd fall over if or when I read it.

 

Thanks a million for all you do.

Don

A

Uhtred will be going north and ever more north, so yes!

 


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Q

Hello Bernard

Just wonder if you are into REHs Conan stories,or anything of his? Love your Uhtred,Arthur & Redcoat books.

Cheers

Wayne.

A

Sorry, I’m not familiar with the stories.


Q

Go ahead and add me to the pile of Uhtred-lovers wondering when book 9 will come out. Can you give us a ballpark? This last book was probably my favorite, and my previous favorite was the first. He's such a great character, thank you for creating him!

Cheers,

Maxwell Buehler

 

Hi Bernard

I wondered if you could tell me when the book you are writing now which is your 9th in the series will be released I have read them all twice and derived a great deal of pleasure from them  thank you

Dave Buck

 

Dear Sir,

After reading and finishing the full Saxon series I was just wondering if you have any plans to continue the story?  I'm asking this because of have never read anything like it in my life before  and now feel I know Uhtred so well and it seems silly but I need to know what happens to him in the future. I have since tried to read other books by other  authors but can't seem to get into them as much as I did with the Saxon series. Once again, thank you so much for bringing this character into my life,  yours,

Mark.

 

A

I am writing the ninth book of the Warrior Chronicles/Saxon stories now.  We hope to see it published in the UK in October and in the US next January.


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I'm a yank!  But, I caught the "Peaky Blinders" on NetFlix and it is amazing.  I hope some of the same BBC crew work on our Lord Uhtred's film debut.  As you imagine, they had better get it right!  We (your faithful reading horde) all have, in our fuzzy brains, a unique way of imagining how Uhtred's war cry sounds, and against all odds we must be made to believe it is really Uhtred on our screen and not some impostor.  No pressure!

 

Two things:

1) Have you watched Peaky Blinders?  If no, well, you my friend are missing out.

2) Not sure if this has been mentioned before, but... you should read less fan-mail and get back to work on the next Uhtred book.  Tick tock!

 

Best regards from a faithful reader,

Ethan

A

I’m missing out. You’re not the first person to tell me and it’s time I remedied it. Thank you!

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

First I would just like to thank you for creating such vivid worlds and inspiring me to have a go at creative writing myself. I just have a couple of questions if you have the time.

In the Last Kingdom Uhtred talks about being a Sceadugengan, a shadow-walker. Is this an invention of yours, or did people of the day believe in such creepy entities lurking in the shadows?

I am currently researching for a Viking inspired fantasy novel, but find that most books on the Vikings are generic and don't have anything special about them. Are there any particular books you have read when researching the Saxon Stories to get the creative juices flowing that you would recommend?

 

Thank you, and all the best,

Stuart

A

They did, and I didn’t make it up (though an Anglo-Saxon scholar chided me for getting the tense wrong)

Here is a link directly to the webpage 'Suggestions for Further Reading' for the Warrior Chronicles:  http://www.bernardcornwell.net/readingclub/?series=the-saxon-stories

 


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I am a huge fan of your books (particularly Uhtred's stories) and I was wondering how you organise your great battle scenes. I know a lot of the battles are written in the Anglo Saxon chronicle etc. but I would imagine that they are not written in much detail and therefore you have to theorise and "work out" how they would have played out based on the terrain and tactics of the day. I was wondering if there are any useful books that explain strategy with regards to warfare of this era (I have tried searching on amazon but with little success). I would love to know how decisions are made how to deploy particular men to particular positions and how the army is organised etc. Sorry for wasting your time with questions like this, I am on tenterhooks waiting for the next Uhtred story and hope there are many (many) more to come as they are my favourite series of all time! Wishing you all the best.

Nicolaas Nicholson

A

I’m afraid it’s all done in my head and, of course, from walking the battlefields where that’s possible. Alfred, Warrior King by John Peddie is a useful book written by a soldier who knows his tactics, but even that contains a deal of speculation. The Chronicle can be infuriating, of course, because it is so bland, but in some ways that’s an opportunity for me.

 


Q

Thank you in advance for your time. When will the last kingdom air on the BBC. I can not find it anywhere.

Bucky Smith

 

Bernard, where does this BBC filming leave us with next novel, I know I'm being impatient but I need my next fix....Have Beeb given any indication as to when they hope to broadcast?

Mark Skelton

 

Mr Cornwell,

 

I am a huge fan of your Saxon Tales Books and have just finished the 8th book when I heard that BBC America is turning the story of Uhtred into a TV show when will it air?

Thank again for a great and awesome series

Terry

A

Don't know for sure - sometime in Oct, Nov or Dec of this year is all we've heard.


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I will keep this short. I have nothing for you to read or to sign. Just one question.  In January a friend handed me a pile of your books neatly tied together with string. "Here. Read these."  She is never wrong.  So just as the Super Bowl was beginning and the chili sinking in, I opened the first book.  "My name is Uhtred."  I had to do some quick googling, and found that I was right to think that the name was familiar.  Ten years ago, being of the age when we look into ancestors, I had been given quite a short cut when researching my grandmother's family, Dundas - a one-half type written page - from my grandmother back to the 12c and a two syllable name.  Uhtred.  You often say that you are related to your Uhtred.  And I know just enough to get myself into trouble here.  But is your Uhtred a Dundas?  Aside from being curious, I love the books.  Thank you.

Maryanne

A

Not that I know of! The families might have married? I don’t have the family tree with me right now, so I can’t check, but it doesn’t ring a bell, sorry.

 


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell,

I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for the endless hours of pleasure you have given through characters such as Derfel, Ulthred and especially Thomas!

I am hoping that my question(s)/pleas, like many before have issued, will get a favorable response (WE BEG YOU good Sir)!

(1) How likely is it that we can expect you to you conclude Derfel's story and Arthur's retirement? (George RR Martin short story format would be totally acceptable!!!!)

(2) How many Uhtred books can we be lucky enough to look forward to?

(3) My only demand - I NEED a Thomas of Hookton novel - or maybe 6! Please continue the story - it can never be stretched or prolonged for too long!

 

Many Thanks for the adventures and the new worlds you have allowed me to absorb myself into! In the boxing world Floyd Mayweather crowns himself with a self-styled cap with the initials 'TBE' - you Sir hold that amongst author's of this generation!

 

SP McC

A

I'm afraid I have no plans to add to Derfel's story.  And I'm not planning more books for Thomas of Hookton at this time.  But I am writing the next book of Uhtred's tale.  Still don't know how many more there might be!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I was wondering if there will be anymore stories about Uhtred. I just finished The Empty Throne and want to know what happens to many of the characters. Will there be any more Saxon Stories?

Patrick McNally

 

Just a note to say thanks for several hours of fantastic reading.  I stumbled across this series looking for something to read between seasons of the History Channel "The Vikings" series.  These books served that purpose and got me hooked.  I "binge read" the entire series of books, only to suffer minor depression at the end of Book 8' because there is no Book 9.  Will there be a Book 9 in this series?  Will Lord Uhtred ever regain his home?

Moving on to the Winter King now, but hoping to hear more from my favorite Pagan warrior in the future!

Thanks much for hours and hours of great reading.

Janette Thompson

A

Yes!  I am writing the next book of the series now!


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Q

I have read all your Uhtred series of books and watched all the History Channel Vikings TV shows to date.

My question is, in your opinion, how much of this show is accurate history. It is certainly very entertaining and seems to fit in with Uthreds experiences.

Last night Athelstan told Ragnar about Paris. More hours on Google.

Tnx

Steve Truscott

A

Can't say....I haven't seen it!


Q

Bernard,

I have just finished the first 8 books in the series, having read 8 first, then going back to start from the beginning. I loved them.

I have recently moved to London from Australia, and have always loved history, particularly English.

I enjoyed your series very much, and look forward to more instalments on Uhtred.

I am thinking I may read the books on Arthur soon.

A question, if I may.

Having recently been to Glastonbury, how much evidence is there that both Arthur and Guinivere are actually buried there?

Thank you again

Regards

Tony

A

None at all! It was a myth.


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell.

First of all I would like to congratulate you on your fantastic work, the way you build your characters and the way you tell the story is legendary, and I´m very excited for the upcoming TV series.

I would like to know how long could the ships in Uhtred´s day travel without having to resupply, and where was the cargo kept aboard the ships. Also, I understand that the crews beached their ships on land to spend the night but was that always the case?

A big fan,

Enrico Lacerda

A

How long is a piece of string? We know they crossed the Atlantic, so they were certainly capable of staying at sea for weeks at a time. They didn’t always beach their boats at night, that really depends on the tide and the shoreline, but they did have anchors or else they simply stayed way out at sea! The cargo would be stored as centrally and as low as possible, i.e. in the belly of the boat.

 


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Q

Hi again, Mr. Cornwell.

I understand your Elizabethan series will be on hold while you do further research.  Is it you plan to finish out Uhtred's saga before you start the new series?

Alan Kempner

A

I never really know what’s next . . . . I’ll discover this summer, but I hope to go back to the Elizabethan!

 


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell,

It sounds a cliche but for me you are a great writer and I really admire your work. I'm from Brazil.

I have observed that most of your books have like scenario the History of England. With Arthur you talked about the first years of Middle Age in England and with Uhtred you continue the same history after the creation of the saxon kingdoms... Do you have plans to write a book or serie about the Norman Conquest and the end of the house of Wessex?

Thanks for your attention!

Nayron

 

I have just finished the empty throne today and I think it may be my favorite of the Uhtred series.

I was wondering if you have ever thought or planned to do anything with the Norman invasion or their reign over England?

Jeremy

A

Sorry, no plans for the Norman Conquest.  I have so many things on my plate now I'm not sure I'll get to them all!

 


Q

I noticed on your site that they are making a show based on Uhtred. I am so excited about that and was hoping you could tell me if it was going to be broadcast in the United States as well? I love the series and devour than as fast as I can. Please write more.

Kelli

 

If Alexander Dreymon is English. I have followed Uhtred from the very first book and will feel very let down and unable to connect with the film if Mr Dreymon(which sounds uncannily like the Japanese character Doraemon) is anything other than English by birth. I know this is not your decision but Uhtred is a very important character to so many people that I have to express my concerns somewhere...not that they will have any effect.

Martyn Forster

 

 

I read the BBC is beginning filming  of The Last Kingdom.  Is there a date for the start of the series and will this be readily available in the US?

I have long enjoyed historical fiction and have enjoyed learning about the 10th legion,  ghengis khan, Agincourt, and the formation of England. I accidently stumbled on this reading heaven starting with your Pagan series and Agincourt. Thank you so much for what you do.

I eagerly await the beginning of the History Channel season 3 of the Vikings to begin in 2 days time.

Robert Finch

 

Hello Mr.Cornwell, I'm your italian fan.I would like to ask you if the tv adaptation of the Saxon stories will be produced for Italian television (if yes how soon?). Thank you so much (Sorry for my little english).

Bye Mr.Cornwell

Giovanni

A

I believe the plan is for it to be shown in the UK and the US, but I don't know about Italy???  I haven't heard the dates yet, but they are filming now.  I think Alexander Dreymon is English?  Does anyone know?


Q

just reading empty throne i love the storys of uhtred of babbemburgany thanks will there be a sequel to the gallows thief? I loved the characters and plo tand the ending just begs another story. I will be the first in line to buy it if you see fit to write another thank you for hours of enjoyable reading

Rory Dent

 

A

I have considered a sequel to Gallows Thief,  but I'm not sure I'll ever get to it!


Q

Hello Bernard,

it's a pleasure to be able to talk to you directly by your website. I think it is really nice of you to keep in touch with your fans.

I've just read the pagan lord (empty throne is not available in Brazil yet) and i have to congratulate you for that fantastic series.

I find it amazing how well you describe the war scenes with such details that it feels like we are there. By far my favorite scenes in the books are the parts where uhtred use military strategy to defeat his enemys, even on unimaginable conditions. I really got interested on the subject, and i am looking for other books that follow kind of theme. Can you recommend some?

I also laughed a lot at the criticism to christianity. It is funny compare how it was back then and how it is today, about how the church works and how it got such power of brainwashing people. It is a shame that so many histories had been badly documented by the church, and because of that today we have scarce sources of information. But hey, that is good to create a good fiction along with historic events!

I always had curiosity about norse mythology but after reading your books i really got interested on knowing more about that subject. Can you recommend some sources about that old belief?

Thank you for your time reading my message and i hope you keep with that energy for the saxon stories and keep giving us amazing books to be enjoyed!

Cristian Llorente

A

I’d recommend The Hammer and the Cross by Robert Ferguson as a good starting point!

 


Q

Hello Bernard,

I am 90% through Empty Throne (audiobook) and I just want to say the banter in this book is brilliant, i love how Uhtred thinks. Everything about him is so great. He's confrontational, tough, wily and theres something about the way he calls people slug shit (I love how he handles preists LOL).  Was reading Firefight by Brandon Sanderson and I put that down to read this. Its incredible engaging

It amazes me to think it only took you a year to make this.

in an age where we have George RR Martin and Patrick Ruthfoss , waiting 6 years for a sequel. I am glad to say that, Bernard Cornwell, makes the case that top quality work can be done in under 6 years. and he doesnt need incestuous gangbangs to do it.

My question is:

Are you Uhtred? which character do you most relate to?

Is Uhtred still considering to take back Bebbanburg, or has he decided to leave that goal to his son?

Babalo Reda

A

I am not! I relate wholly to Obadiah Hakeswill.

I think he has to, don’t you?


Q

hi mr cornwell

once again i am left awaiting uhtreds next story after a fantastic empty throne story,even more so at the thought of uhtred and finian passing through or by my home town of evesham awsome.will uthred meet king cnut ? or will that make him to old ? i was wondering this as king cnut is said to have owned a house in evesham which i walk pass most days,also i like to ask will uthred jnr take over uthreds story into William the Conqueror era i ask this as with the harrowing of the north by william the  Abbot Æthelwig of evesham abbey  took in refugees from the north .as you can tell i love my little vale and would love some one to mention the great abbey that once was here but now only remains in little pieces in buildings built from its remains in and around surrounding villages (very sad).

thanks again and look forward to next book

richie from evesham

A

Uhtred will certainly live a long time, but even he can’t make it to Cnut’s reign! And I’ll do my best for your lovely abbey!

 


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

Many years ago, about 1983 to be exact, I read a book featuring Uhtred, Ragnar, Sven, Ravn et al. After reading your more recent books on the subject I wondered whether you were, perhaps, the author of the earlier work?

yours

L Britton (an interested fan)

A

Wasn't me!


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Q

Hi,

The Empty Throne - absolutely marvellous! Loved it! What a woman Stiorra has turned out to be, a shame she left but I'm sure we'll see her again, she will be the mother of kings! I remember writing to you years ago about the possibility of Uhtred fighting in Wales and I got the sensible answer "not if he wants to live", well I'm glad he's not the sensible sort and he finally ventured into Cymru. Thankfully, he met the great Hywel Dda and fought alongside the Welsh rather than against them, and so his story didn't come to a bloody end in Wales.

Since Uhtred mentions that he met Hywel again I hope he makes a return in the future.

 

I also hope Uhtred listens to Aethelflaed and gets rid of Eadith, I may be wrong, but I got the impression that while Aethelflaed still loved Uhtred he was starting to cool towards her. If he hurts Aethelflaed...

I hope he doesn't trade her for a younger model, isn't Sigunn enough.

 

Will Pyrlig return once more before he dies? (I think he's ten or twenty years older than Uhtred) and when will Uhtred finally gut that traitorous earsling Haesten! or will they have to fight with walking sticks at Brunanburh...

I also hope Finan will finally make it back to Ireland and have his revenge, how long can he be "the Agile"? I hope he can retire as the lord/king of his tribe. He mentioned in The Lords of the North that his lord refused to pay his ransom when he was caught because he wanted to have Finan's woman but recently he has told Uhtred that his younger brother was involved with his betrayal, I hope there will be a reckoning.

Lastly, I did notice that Stiorra became the youngest child instead of the middle as she was previously, in the beginning of chapter 3 of Sword Song she is two which would make her 28? in The Empty Throne.

 

Thanks, I eagerly await what's next,

Rhun.

A

I am working on the next book now - we'll have to wait and see....


Q

When is your next saxon tale book coming out?

Joshua Dannar

 

Is there a title for the 9th Saxon tale about Uhtred? Thank you.

Terry Sullivan

 

Sir, I have read all the eight books thus far in the series and wonder what the plans are for Uhtred and his return to Babbenburg.

Is there more?

Hope so.

Cheers

Sam

A

I am working on the 9th book of the series now.  No title yet, but I hope it will be ready for publication in the UK in October and next January in the US.


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Q

Hello Mr Cornwell

I'm a big fan of your books especially Uhtred's adventures and I have a question regarding him. In one of your books you made a few comments about how Uhtred liked to take the amulets of the bravest enemies he faced and sew them to the hem of his mail coat. I thought this was a really cool idea and was wondering why you stopped writing about it and if you plan to do so again in the future?

Thanks

Neville.

 

A

I did?  I must revive the thought!


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Q

Hi Bernard hope you're well?

Excellent news about Uhtred being brought to the small screen.

Just a thought - Sharpe and Starbuck share the same universe (as you've acknowledged with Lassan) - and similarly The Grail Quest and the story of Azincourt - but is this true with all your historical fictions?

It would be nice to think that if Starbuck read an in-universe history book of the British Isles he might read a tale or two of Derfel or Uhtred for example.

Or perhaps Uhtred (or Sharpe or Nate or any character for that matter) is descended from a character in the Warlord Chronicles. Etc, etc.

Thanks again

Allyn

(I know it's a long list but you did say you'd name a character for me - the Saxon story you're working on couldn't possibly be devalued by a bit of "Allyn" surely? Haha)

 

A

It is tempting to connect the books that way, but I resist the temptation as far as I can…it does seem a bit artificial!

Allyn, eh? Be careful what you wish for . . . . .


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Q

I greatly enjoyed The Empty Throne, (and all the other Saxon Tales) and only complain about how long I'll have to wait before I can read about Uhtred's next adventure. One question: are you familiar with the Cadfael Chronicles, written by Edith Pargeter (aka Ellis Peters) and set in 12th century England? I have a particular reason for asking.

Sandra Berthene

A

Not only familiar, but a fan!

 


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Q

Dear Bernard,

I am confused, will your next published book be the next Uhtred or the new series you have started? As usual I have to bring Starbuck to your attention, neither of us are getting any younger and I don't want to find out what happens to him from you when we are together in Valhalla. Kind regards

Lee

A

Uhtred is next!


Q

Mr Cornwell

I recently read Gallows Thief, having been concentrating on the other series' before that.

I love how you caught the squalor and harshness of the era. Were you ever tempted to do more with Sandman? He probably could;t rescue another; he wasn't actually that good at seeing the truth was he, but his import business and the surrounding intrigue?

Sandman makes reference to being rescued in Spain by a small company of rifleman; this was not a subtle reference to Mr Sharpe was it?

Loved the latest Uhtred book and liked the way you started the narrative with the son as a means to prolong the story perhaps. We get to read more then!

Thanks and keep up the good work

Steve

A

I have considered a sequel to Gallows Thief but I'm not sure I'll ever get to it.

Could be....


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Q

Hello Bernard,

massive fan of your works. I was wondering, now that you're 70, do you have any plans to retire? Or will you keep going until you, uhhh, join Uhtred in Valhalla (assuming he got there!!)

Dan

A

I retired 35 years ago. It’s going fine, thank you.

 


Q

hello,

just to ask if you know of the history of the Berkeley family at berkeley in glos, uk. i started work there as a guide a short while ago, which i find very interesting. In the Empty Throne which i have just finished and enjoyed, just love the Uhtred stories. you base quite a lot on gloucester, and mention Godwin Godwinson, in the castle there is the Godwin cup, with a myth and story to it about Godwin. do you know anything about it? Have you ever been to Berkeley castle and do you know much about the story of it as it was built about the time set of your book. We recently had the film crew of Wolf Hall there for some of the scenes. sorry to babble on but I also come from essex, stock, near to billericay. i now live near to Berkeley castle to be near to my family here. with best wishes and a big well done for all your wonderful stories. Do i remember you saying that you have ancestry connected to Uhtred or Bamburgh castle?

with best wishes

Linda Lewis

A

I’ve visited Berkeley Castle many times!  It’s one of my favourites.  Not sure I feel that way about Billericay, though!


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I was reading "The Last Kingdom", and Uhtred said that he tell his story to his grandsons and great-grandsons. In "Lord of the Norths Uhtred" he say that has 84. Considering that actually Uhtred is near 50, and with 84 he is great-grandfather, he shouldn't already be grandfather?

I love Saxon Stories and I'm your fan!

Lucas

A

He is!


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell,

I noticed on your comment board that you told an inquirer that Uhtred is in your family tree. He is also in mine which leads me to wonder if you might be related to my DAR relative, William Cornell. I have some interesting stories on William's life as a Revolutionary soldier and know who his descendants are, but I can't find anything more on his parents. His father, Capt. John Cornell, was a British soldier stationed in Dublin, Ireland where William was born. He died at the battle of Ticonderoga, and that's all I know about him. William's son, Dr. William Cornwell, changed the family name from Cornell to Cornwell. I wonder if Cornwell was the original name. I realize people didn't pay so much attention to spelling then. It's just a long shot, but since you seem to know something of your family history, I would like to know if you know of John or William Cornell, and if so, have you traced them back any further? I don't know the name of John's wife, William's mother, but I know that after her husband's death, she and 15 year old William went to New York where they supported themselves making and selling lace.

Sorry to bother you if you are not related. No need to reply if you have no knowledge of my relatives. I thought there might be a chance since you have traced your ancestry. I look forward to reading your books. I'm also a descendant of Alfred I, as many of your fans, the kings of Northumbria, and Rollon the Viking.

Carolyn Albins

A

I’ve no idea!  I know a lot about my Oughtred (Uhtred) ancestors and almost nothing about the Cornwells except that they were probably a family from east Anglia that moved to London in the 19th Century. We could be related!


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Hello Bernard,

 

Nice writing to you! My question: do you make up pagan and warrior spells like when, in The Last Kingdom, Ealdwulf put his own spells into the sword Serpent Breath, he made for Uhtred. Likewise, Brida took the blade into the woods for a whole night and put the spells of a woman on it. Then, on the request of Uhtred, Ragnar used Serpent-Breath at Yule to kill a prisoner, so to bring the blade to the attention to Odin in order for him to look well on her. Presumably, actually, Brida's spells would be Christian? but did you invent these spells or have some of these spells been documented?

Thanks for your time!

Leni.

A

Spells are documented, yes, but I make them up!


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Q

Hi again, Mr. Cornwell.

Does Uhtred's wolf-helm have a full face plate like the Sutton Hoo Helmet?  Or just the "spectacle" eye-guards?

Alan Kempner

 

A

Hinged cheek pieces, definitely not the spectacle eye-guards!


Q

Sir,

Like many others I've enjoyed your novels immensely over the years. Having enjoyed the adventures of Uhtred, Sharpe etc, I commend you on your strong female characters. My question is, simply, in writing Gisela, Teresa, Jeanette or Æthelflaed, is it a balancing act between what is plausible in light of the reality of the times and your desire to portray an admirable, strong woman?

Paul Seesequais

 

A

It is a balancing act! And I probably tip too far in the direction of making them strong, but as you see, I like them that way!

 


Q

Good Day!

I see that you've begun your next Uhtred book (yay!) but was wondering about the Elizabethan-era tale you had been working on.  Can I assume it's finished, or did you leave it mid-way through to get back to Uhtred?  Any title/release date/synopsis yet?

Thanks for many hours of entertainment!

Will

 

 

Not that I'm disappointed we're getting another Uhtred book next, but I thought you were starting a new series. What's happened? Has it run aground?

Dan

A

 

It’s been put on the long finger because it needed more research.


Q

I greatly enjoy your novels - not least for their historical accuracy and have recommended them to people as a way of picking up historical facts whilst reading a good story. Am currently reading "The Empty Throne" and, (possibly incorrectly), have a suspicion that if Uhtred survives that long you might be going to place the battle of Brunanburh in the Wirral. If you are going to include the battle, before you settle on the location could I ask you to read two articles by the historian Michael Wood; 1st, Chapter 11, "Tinsley Wood" in his book "In Search of England" published in 1999, and 2nd: his article "Searching for Brunanburh: The Yorkshire Context of the Great War of 937", published in Volume 85, (2013), of the Yorkshire Archaeological Journal. I know the location is contentious but I think anyone who actually reads the two articles above would think he has reason on his side, (but then I would say that, because I agree with him)!

Best wishes with the writing; (my only complaint is that I can read your books faster than you can write them).

Regards,

Richard Hunt

A

Wherever I decide to put it (and the Wirral is the most likely) I’m going to be in trouble! I’ve read the arguments for other places and, frankly, unless some new and wonderful evidence turns up we’ll probably never know.


Q

Only to repeat what countless others have said, which is the characters of Uhtred, Derfel, Nicholas hook and Thomas of Hookton have provided me with hours of entertainment, historical enrichment and appreciation for historical fiction, I thank you Mr Cornwell I am a huge fan. ( Sean Bean is also stupendous as your Sharpe! ) Just one question, I don't wish to badger you with questions over any new titles in your current series as I believe they will come when they will, ( however your books on the Hundred Years' War are fantastic please return to those and another Uhtred adventure), what other historical eras have you considered maybe starting a new set of stories in?

 

Thank you

Henry Bishop

A

Oh I have lots of ideas, but for right now I'm sticking with Uhtred.


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Q

Mr Cornwell,

as carnival productions are filming the start of Saxon chronicles for tv.

Will you complete Uhtreds story before anything is televised. ?

Ps absolutely fantastic books ,can't wait for next one. Thank you.

Neil

A

I don't think so...


Q

Hi There -

I'm a tremendous fan. I was curious if there's a medical precedent for the wound Uhtred suffered and the respite he received when punctured by Ice-spite. Is his severe pain and sudden recovery based on fact?

 

Many thanks for all your hard work and brilliant stories.

David

 

A

I refer you to my medical adviser who, unlike me, is a doctor! And yes, a bad wound could lead to infection, but not necessarily. At the battle of Quatre Bras in 1815 Ensign Christie took (I think) 22 wounds, including a lance through the eye that emerged in his mouth, and he survived and, frankly, medical knowledge of infection was no more advanced in 1815 than in 815! They did have some remedies that were surprisingly effective – spider-webs on a wound is one, and it works (to an extent). But it was really a question of luck whether a wound went gangrenous or not.


Q

Hi Bernard,

as a proud Northumbrian I must say that I enjoy your writings in "The Warrior Chronicles" series and have just finished "The Empty Throne". Yet another success for our hero Uhtred of Bebbanburg. I note that you are presently working on book 9 in the series so may I ask, is our Lord Uhtred any nearer to regaining his birthright of the throne of Bebbanburg? In addition, I can't wait until "The Last Kingdom" appears on our TV screens. Do you have any input into the screenwriter's interpretation of the story? I do hope the film company does your writing the justice it deserves. Good luck for the future and please retain your muse.

David Vose

 

A

We'll have to wait and see!

 

My input is very limited!


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Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

 

Firstly, let me congratulate you on your amazing books. I have enjoyed them all but have developed an admiration and enjoyment of Uhtred. My question relates to his story, well actually it is two questions. Forgive the liberty. Firstly, why when Ragnar died, for someone who Uhtred thought of as a brother, you seemed to just pass over his death very quickly. Was this deliberate or were you tired of his place in Uhtreds story? Secondly, will we see Steapa again?

 

I apologize for rambling and taking up your time.

 

With regards

 

Adam Roberts.

 

A

It was deliberate . . . . maybe a mistake . . .  but Ragnar had somewhat faded from the stories so I thought it best.

I do think we'll see Steapa again....


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Hi Bernard,

About a third of the way through 'The Empty Throne', my question touches on a more philosophical note: personally, do you believe those who have died can view or visit the world as it progresses? I was quite intrigued when Uhtred suddenly wondered whether the spirits of Romans, for example, now found thatched huts and wooden churches mostly replaced the familiar stone villas. Those of a more recent Roman period might perhaps understand what had happened to the 'Britannia' province, realizing (with some fascination) that the Saxon 'barbarian' hordes (as depicted in your Warlord Chronicles) eventually settled the land, governed by laws, commerce, and taxes. Ironically, the Danes embarked on much the same path - but do you think, if Wessex had been destroyed, a 'Daneland' would have eventually begun to embrace Christianity in the same way?

Robert Douglas

A

Yes, I’m certain ‘Daneland’ would have turned Christian (just as the Scandinavian homelands did). It seems to have been an inexorable process, often initiated by missionaries who first persuaded the rulers to convert and relied on them to forcibly convert their subjects. Nowhere held out against the process, so I can’t imagine Daneland would have.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have two questions, but first let me say I was happy to see Uhtred (the Christian) join his father, Uhtred (the pagan) for a little sword song. First Q: I don't think the Saxons regained Engaland until about ten years after the death of Knut the Great (1042-1045). Since the "Empty Throne" takes place in 911, I calculate (say 40 years per) that at least three generations of Uhtred's are left to help achieve this. Do you see the saga going that far?

Second Q: In the 10th century both the Danes and Norse were speaking basically the same language, "Old Norse", while the Saxons were speaking "Old English", which I thought was a closely related Germanic dialect. In the Saxon stories there seems to be a larger linguistic distinction. Is that your intention, or am I incorrect? Thank you.

Peter Hansen

A

Aethelstan is usually regarded as the first king of a united England, and that occurs in the early 10th Century. It’s true that the kingdom is split again, but nevertheless England comes to exist under Aethelstan!

 

There is a distinction, yes, and it’s deliberate. The languages are closely related, but they were still largely impenetrable to each other.

 


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Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I just want to say that  I love the Saxon Chronicles series and Uhtred is the man!! After purchasing the whole series on audio and listening to them all ,I noticed that Uhtred never used a crossbow, which was around during the 9th century.This weapon could have made his battles come to quick end and save lives. Why?  Also I'M jonesing for the next book in this series to come ,do you have one in the works now? Thanks for being a great Author !

Jim

A

Because the Saxons and the Danes didn’t use crossbows, that’s why!

Yes!


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Q

In the Saxon Tales, will Uhtred and Finan travel to Ireland to get revenge with those who put Finan in slavery?

Jim Brook

A

Hmmmmm. Maybe? Maybe in the book I’m writing now? Maybe!

 


Q

Will this book now end the series of Uhtred? Much as I love reading it and have the whole set including your other series. I'm a great fan. I  would like it to finish as I believe Uhtred can go no further, if at the end of the book  which I haven't got to yet, he reaches home.

Barbara

 

Hi,

 

I have just read the last book in the series The Empty Throne.  I have been 'swallowing' the books up, the story theme is just great .......... how many more will there be in the set of Chronicles?

Angie Elfassi

 

Is the empty throne the last of the Saxon books? I've read them all in the last 4 months enjoyed them greatly. Hope it's not the last one.                              Yours truly   L. W.

 

A

I am writing the next book now, but still don't know who many there will be in this series!


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Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

With great pleasure I have read many of your novels, e.g. the Sharpe series and the stories of Uhtred. Thes offered many plesant hours of reading.

 

Recently I have read your account of the battle of Waterloo. In this context, I noticed that you wrote Duke Friedrich Wilhelm of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel-Oels, the "Schwarze Herzog", died by a shot through his head at Les Quatre Bras. He died in the batttle of Quattre Bras, this is correct. The cause of death was not a shot through the head though. He was shot through his hand, lung, and liver.

 

In the Heimatmuseum in Braunschweig the blouse he was wearing on 16 June 1815 at Les Quatre Bras is displayed. You can see the whole of the deadly bullet there.

 

I have lived in Braunschweig for six years and developed some interest in its history. Maybe this is why I stumbled over this sentence in your book. By the way, Braunschweig offers a lot of historical monuments and documents of this era.

 

Congratulations to your work!

 

Kind regards,

Uwe Dengler

A

Well, I’ll stick with my source, but who knows? There could well have been more than one musket ball?

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

sorry to bother you, I am a very big fan and have read all of your books. I currently enjoy THE WARRIOR CHRONICLES. In these wonderful books , the character Uhtred uses the phrase "wyrd bid ful aread -fate is enexorable.. I love languages, could you please tell me what actual language this comes from please. Silly question I know. I look forward to your reply, as long as you have time,

.Yours faithfully

Scott.

A

English!  But the English spoken in Uhtred's time, which these days we call Old English.  But it is still English.

 

 

 


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Q

Greetings --

Just finished The Empty Throne.  Best of the bunch so far!!  In the Historical Note, you mention the Brunanburh battle as being another story.  Is that the next for Uhtred, and if yes, when?  Hopefully we are not finished with Uhtred yet, you write grandchildren, and we need more information.

Regards.

Bud R.

A

I am writing the ninth book of the series now....we'll have to see what happens!


Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

As I was reading about Uhtred's failed attempt to take Bebbanburg, I reflected that it might have been different if he had known about siege artillery.  If he had been able to set up a couple of trebuchets or a proper battering ram on wheels with a protective roof, he could have knocked down or burned the High Gate.  These things were known to the Romans, and the scholars of the day must have had some idea that they had existed, yet we see none till the Crusades. In your opinion, why did the Danes and Saxons never develop ballistae and catapults?

Alan Kempner

A

I have no idea!  I suspect the technology required is not as simple as it seems to us, and the nature of the defences was not so uniform. The ballistae etc were useful against stone walls, but they were few and far between in Saxon times.  A palisade would have been knocked down easily, but was fronted by a ditch. Truly, I have no idea. It just didn’t happen!

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

 

At the age of 44, I fear I may be about to embark on that sport of retired (in military terms only!) soldiers – writing rambling letters to journalists.

 

I am delighted that Uhtred lives to fight another day at the end of ‘The Empty Throne” – thank you for another thoroughly enjoyable read.  Santa was particularly generous this Christmas, (my mother keeps a close eye out for your books), so I hope you will be glad to hear that my knowledge of the Waterloo campaign is now rather more coherent!.  Again, thank you.

 

Whether Uhtred, Thomas Hookton or Derfel, I must confess to being a life-long fan -romantic tales of glory and high adventure have never failed to catch my eye, and I suppose this is the reason why most young men join armies.  In about 1982, I remember my father had 2 paperback books on a side-table.  A Rifleman himself, it seemed only logical that he might have bought “Sharpe’s Eagle” and “Gold”.  I fear it’s the last he saw of them – and they still sit amongst my collection!  Although I am a 4th generation soldier, having followed my dad into The Royal Green Jackets, and its recent successor The Rifles, I am of course very biased – Richard Sharpe remains very firmly primus inter pares!

 

Sean Bean’s excellent Sharpe (albeit 5’8”ish and Yorkshire, rather than 6’3” and cockney, sadly) was of course compulsive watching when I joined the regiment in 1993, and when I left 4 years ago I am glad to report that The Rifles continued to bask in his reflected glory.  We loved Sharpe, although (as a 6’3” Rifleman myself) I must confess that Daragh O’Malley’s Patrick Harper, whilst good theatre, was a less credible soldier and not a patch on your original!

 

Like all my contemporaries, I played a small part in ‘Blair’s Wars’ – not Britain’s finest historical hours I fear, but we played the hand the Army dealt us, I suppose.  I therefore have a row of medals which may look impressive to the uninitiated, but is really closer to military ‘air miles’ – nothing to compare with those who fought in 2 world wars, or indeed the occasionally savagery of Napoleonic campaigning.  However the Army’s ‘mark of Cain’ means I have been fortunate to have had experiences not all can enjoy, and more poignantly made friendships whose depths can only be forged in adversity of some sort – albeit sadly some of our ranks did not come home.

 

As I drafted this letter I was staring out across horizontally blown snow in a Scottish glen.  With our Independence referendum recently decided, but the issue very far from resolved, it makes me wonder whether your eye will ever look ‘north of the border’.   Perhaps the history of the 1689, 1715 and 1745 uprisings has been picked bare, but I suspect not.  I was always rather proud that our Regimental museum had a set of bagpipes from the Highland Company – presumably the sons and grandsons of catholic Highlanders – from when the 95th Rifles were formed in 1800.   10 regiments each produced a company of their best, to create the new regiment and exploit the latest military technology – the rifle.    So I suppose Sharpe would have known them … if they could have understood one another, or perhaps his French son may have met their descendants in the American Civil War.

 

I also remember that you mention General Sir John Moore in “The Fort”.  A copy of the well-known picture of General Moore takes pride of place in the Officers Mess in Edinburgh Castle (I now work for the Army’s charity in Scotland, so occasionally visit the Mess).  Arguably Scotland’s greatest soldier, his statue stands in Glasgow’s central George Square.    Moore’s legacy on modern soldiering is of course the sight of camouflaged soldiers, working in pairs, using their initiative and firing rifles.  Although replaced by radios, I am glad to report that our bugles still travel on operational tours!  Strongly-held views of course continue to fuel irregular warfare, as Moore must have seen in North America.  Today’s savage religious extremism perhaps proves that some things don’t change; maybe Uhtred is right – ‘fate is inexorable’.

 

Apologies, a long and rambling 'letter' – I really just wanted to say thank your for many years enjoyment.  May your prolific ‘buckle’ continue to be ‘swashed’! I look forward to the next installment.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Charles Dunphie

A

 

I doubt my eye will wander north of the border!  I feel those tales should be told by a Scot!

He was a very great man!  I know the statue in Glasgow and I’m pleased to hear he’s in Edinburgh Castle too! Thank you!

 


Q

Sir,

I was in the military over 24 years and I still work for the Army. Your books went to war with me and it took me away from the daily issues. I love Sharpe and Uhtred. Sharpes DVDs are wonderful I have them all. I am glad to see BBC will be putting together a series.  I know having so many books and characters,  I was wondering if you are going to revive the Grail quest and Starbuck series. Again thank you for all the wonderful writing.

Ernest Casey

A

I don't have plans to add to the Grail Quest series but I do hope to return to Starbuck one day.


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Q

Thanks so much for writing the great stories in "Saxon Tales" !  I just finished "Sword Song", and appreciate the amount of research you must have done to describe 9th century life in such a realistic way.  I do wonder how much was actually known about the personality of King Alfred?  He and Uhtred are so vividly portrayed.  I have a personal interest in this, being directly descended from Alfred, 36th generation through his daughter Ethelfrida (variation on Aethelflaed, I assume) and granddaughter Elswina..  Further descendants landed in Groton, MA in 1640 and eventually migrated to Maine, where I now live. Thanks for any light you can shed on this.  Can't wait to read the rest of the series!  Jan

A

We do know a fair amount about Alfred, partly from his own writings (scholarly, pious, earnest) and from the description of him in Asser’s life of Alfred which is revealing and thorough. There is a theory that Asser’s book is a forgery, though it seems very unlikely (why?), and most scholars accept that it is what it says on the cover – a biography of King Alfred written by a contemporary

 

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

 

I recently watched a documentary on the Anglo-Saxon hoard found near Staffordshire, England. The whole time I was watching it I couldn't help but think it was left there by one of Uhtred's contemporaries. Do you know much about the find and could it have been from the time of Alfred the Great?

 

Thank you for your wonderful stories!

 

Graham - New Jersey

A

The Hoard predates my stories, and, hoards are so common that I tried to incorporate them anyway (Uhtred buries a hoard at least once).  I have visited the Anglo-Saxon galleries in the British Museum and I'd guess that 80% of the exhibits were labelled as being from a hoard.

 

 

 

 

 


Q

Who would win in a fight, Uhtred or Derfel?  Uhtred, right?

Danny

A

No idea!  A draw.


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Q

Mr. Cornwell,

 

I attended one of the Sharpe's tours in Spain in 2008 and was wondering if anyone is conducting a similar tour of historic sites based on the Uhtred books?  I enjoy your work and look forward to your future publications.

 

Sincerely,

Joe Stevenson

 

A

I haven't heard of any plans for a tour.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I am a huge fan, and I have in fact emailed you before! My grandfather got me into your books about four years ago. I got the Empty Throne and Waterloo for Christmas and have finished the Empty Throne and am about to start Waterloo, Uthred has been my favourite character of all of your main, but Finan is probably the funniest with his quick remarks and I enjoy their long conversations. What is your favourite character that you have ever produced? In the Warrior Chronicles? And that you have read? Also, I thought that Uhtred's description of King Edward was very similar to George RR Martins King Robert in a Game of Thrones and wondered if you took the idea from that character?  Will Uhtred's sorry end with his death or will you carry it on through his son like you did in the prologue to the Empty Throne? Finally I am wondering if you will bring out two books again in 2015 or just one and what book(s) it/they will be? Will it be Uthred? A stand alone or a new series? since several have come to a close. Thank you for reading this and I would like to add I wish to be an author one day myself and have taken a lot of inspiration from your works, you have definitely been a huge influence for my wish to write and have had a massive mark on my future and mark on my life.

Thank You once again

Tierney Witty,

A

Favourite character - Ceinwyn in the Arthurian books

Favourite character in the Warrior Chronicles - Eadith

Favourite character from any book I've read - Nell Gwynne

I did not

I’ll know when I get there!

One book in 2015 - Uhtred


Q

The Warrior Chronicle series. Does it end with the Empty Throne or is there going to be another book i.e. Uhtred regaining Bebbanburh ?

In your historical note of the Empty Throne you said ; Indeed Brunanburh is the battle that, at long last will complete Alfred's dream and forge a united England, but that's another story.

Thanks

Dave

 

Dear Sir,

I have read the complete Sharpe series.

On the 10th Sept 2014 I picked up 'The Last Kingdom' in a holiday apartment in Athens, towards the end of a 4 month o/s trip from Turramurra, Sydney Australia.

Today, 8th Jan 2015 I finished reading, in sequence, "The Empty Throne", the 8 book in the series.

What an absolutely enjoyable read I have had for the last 4 months!!!!!

Thanks so much.

I just have to have more, and hope not to leave this Earth until Uhtred of Bebbanburg finally takes back his fortress.

Please tell me that there is more in the pipeline, and perhaps when we might expect to see it????

To feed the habit, and fill the gap until this happens, I have had to start reading the  "Warlord Chronicles", and I am sure this will enthrall me as much as all the others,

Kind regards,

Selwyn Abrahams

 

I just finished reading "THE EMPTY THRONE." I have read most of Bernard Cornwell's books and enjoyed then very much. Is there a new book on the horizon?

Bob Ireland

 

Just read book 8, the Empty Throne. Loved it as always!

Please tell me you are working on a 9th book in this series!

 

Keith

A

I have started writing the ninth book of Uhtred's tale; hopefully it will be ready for publication later this year!


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Q

Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I'm your fan, and I love Saxon Stories.

I have a question: In some question, you answered that Uhtred has many bastards.

Some of these will be mentioned in future stories??

Thanks!

Lucas

A

Oh, probably!


Q

Hi Mr.Cornwell.

I'm your fan!

I finished to read "The Empty Throne", and I have some doubts...

Sigtryggr Ivarson is son of Ivar Ivarson? The Ivar 16-years who appeared in "The Lords of the North"?

Uhtred Uhtredson will marry with Ælfwynn?

Thanks

I'm waiting anxious by next Uhtred's book!!

Lucas

A

Doubts?  Well, Sigtryggr isn’t the son of Ivar Ivarson and I’ve no idea who Uhtred Uhtredson will marry! I guess we share the doubts! Read on, all will become clear (I hope!)

 


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Q

Dear Bernard

Another winner with 'The Pagan Lord'! keep em coming.

From the postscript I assume the future King Athelstan will also have Uhtred assisting him against any nasties that seek to invade 'Angeland', but will he still be around for Brunaburgh or will the younger Uhtred assume his duties. I only ask as Uhtred 'the elder' would be around 80 by then or will that be his swansong? Sources do say that English losses were not light so maybe he dies near the end of the battle, maybe as per Brian Boru at Clontarf, almost as an afterthough by a rather 'pissed off' Dane!

 

Whatever you decide I know it will be right!

 

Regards

 

Russell Newland

A

It’s a proble!  I’ll face it when we get to it, but yes, he will live impossibly long and he will be at Brunanburh (though I doubt he’ll be swinging a sword there)

 


Q

Brilliant series, well worth the high accolades given.

Just an idea that might not have occurred to you, but wonder if Lord Uhtred Untredson, second son now Uhtred the second, might not have a book of his own?

As he appears quite intelligent, good at swordsmanship, and well read like his father. And as you have briefly mention, like a chip off the old block, (Head strong, and quick witted).

Would be well worth a read to follow this person life, and I wonder what could become of Father Judas???

With your talent for story telling, it should be as gripping as the Warrior series.

Best intentions,

Tim

A

You’ll find out!


Q

After reading the latest Uhtred installment, I experienced an urge to re-read the Starbuck Chronicles, so did just that. I just wanted to point out what a wonderful series this is! I think perhaps Starbuck is your most thoughtful character, which I greatly enjoy, and with a supporting cast of other great characters like Truslow, Pecker, Swynyard and Blythe it's right up there with your best work. I know it's unlikely we'll ever see this series finished and I can understand you not wanting to take a backwards step to do so - but it's a real shame it's been left unfinished.

 

Sharpe's old man... a smuggler who _might_ be a fictional character? Crikey. Time for another guess - how about Dirk Hatteraick from Walter Scott's "Guy Mannering"? Fictional smuggler, but reputed to be based upon the real smuggler Captain Yawkins.

Phil Dean

A

Good guess! Wrong though.


Q

Hi Bernard,

I've just read The Empty Throne and really enjoyed it. However there is a question I would like to ask which you may well have been asked before.

How after Eadith has stabbed him with Ice-Spite is Uhtred able to draw Serpent-Breath and hit the ships hull (page 234) with it when he had left the sword on the boat and only took Wasp-Sting with him? Finan had earlier pulled him a sword from the pile of weapons taken by the Welsh in the fight (page 219).

Best wishes

Jim Cook

A

I have no idea. He’s a hero. He does three impossible things before breakfast.

 


Q

I thought when you started the series that you had said it was going to be 8 parts but having read Empty Throne (the 8th) you are nowhere near getting Uhtred back to taking Babbenburg.......

 

Please tell me that you are going to be continuing the story

Carol Beels

A

Yes, Uhtred's story will continue....


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Q

May I hazard a guess that your next novel will be a Bernard Cornwell take on the Spanish Armada of 1588?

Loving the Uhtred books,  impatient for more.

Regards

Alex

A

You can hazard the guess! It isn’t about the Armada though!

 


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Hi

,I am a huge fan and  I just want to know if we will ever see Constantin and Cellach back in the Uhtred series. In burning land uhtred observed constantin was only slightly younger than himself ( which I assume means that his birth was moved forward) and uhtred now regrets not slitting his throat, are we only going to see him when the real constantin came on the scene? Or is his timeline pushed forward?

Arman razak

A

I think we’ll meet again!


Q

Dear Mr.Cornwell.

I highly enjoyed your Grail Quest series and recently delved into The Saxon Tales a month ago. I have just finished The Empty Throne and am looking forward to the next chapter of Uhtred's adventures :)

I understand you visited Vancouver, Canada a decade ago and was present at the Writer's Festival at the H.R. McMillan Space Centre. Will you consider visiting Vancouver again for another book signing in the future?

Thank you for reading, and I thank you for creating such wonderful and phenomenal stories! All the best to you!

Yours sincerely,

Michael

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

A

I would love to return to Vancouver!  It's beautiful there!


Q

'I am Odin. I have gained wisdom!“ I liked the dialogues in Uhtred's adventures.

Don’t you think an injury like a sword cut through an eye and face would lead to a deadly infection in these centuries?

What a fascinating recovery of Uhtred: is there any historic evidence that this method of healing has ever worked (stabbing someone with a sword)?

Christian Zier

 

A

Yes, there is evidence! And I refer you to my medical adviser who, unlike me, is a doctor! And yes, a bad wound could lead to infection, but not necessarily. At the battle of Quatre Bras in 1815 Ensign Christie took (I think) 22 wounds, including a lance through the eye that emerged in his mouth, and he survived and, frankly, medical knowledge of infection was no more advanced in 1815 than in 815! They did have some remedies that were surprisingly effective – spider-webs on a wound is one, and it works (to an extent). But it was really a question of luck whether a wound went gangrenous or not.

 


Q

Bernard,

I am a huge admirer of your work, and as such, I started reading your Saxon Chronicles, which are amazing, congratulations! But there is one thing that keeps bugging me every time Uhtred describes a ship:

in the series, you describe a regular warship of the time as quite a large vessel, many times carrying crews up to more than 60 men, and having large storage space and elevated bow platforms, as well as a small space beneath the steering platform where Uhtred generally slept. Descriptions, I ( having done some amateur research)  found no to be matching the traditional viking ship standard known today, taking into consideration the  archaeological evidence that has been discovered to date.

I would like to know where have you based your research for the ships described in the series, and if you could tell me where to find proper historically accurate viking ship specifications.

Your huge fan,

Enrico

A

There are so many places to find the information!  I brought material back from the Viking ship museum near Stockholm, but almost any general book on the Vikings will have specifications. Sizes vary, of course, but the large Skuldelev long ship is over 90 feet in length with a beam of almost fifteen feet. That’s a big ship! The Oseberg and Gokstad ships (buried as graves) were over 70 feet long. I’m sorry it bugs you, but there it is! They built large ocean-going ships and, because they were essentially warships, would have commensurately large crews. The large Skuldelev ship is reckoned to have taken at least fifty oars, so a crew of 60 doesn’t seem crazy to me.


Q

In a message from 'sean' on 14th sept he takes you to task for saying that Osbert (later Uhtred junior ) couldn't have been taught Danish by Gisela as she died giving birth to him. And you apologised!!

Gisela died giving birth to a fourth unnamed child, not Osbert, so she could have taught Osbert Danish.

 

However you have conveniently changed Uhtred;s children's birth order around. It was initially stated that Stiorra was the middle child, but in later books she is the youngest. Not to mention that you also changed the amount of years between them too.

Don't you check continuity?

Cathy

A

I did? It’s his fault, he can never remember his childrens’ birthdays (I confess that I don’t know my daughter’s either, but she’s nice and forgives me).

 


Q

Congratulations on Uhtred's latest book. The Last Kingdom and the Pale Horseman were always my favourite books in the series but I have LOVED the two most recent ones. I think the stories have come alive recently through Uhtred's children and the pages just melt away reading about them. What I love most about them is that each of them have a core part of Uhtred about them.

There's Uhtred who is every bit the warrior that his father is.

There's father Judas who is every bit as stubborn as his father is.

And there's Stiorra who is every bit the anarchist her father is.

I loved the suspense of the opening chapter where Uhtred the younger was the protagonist, will we see more chapters like this in the series? Was it much different writing from his perspective? I was disappointed to not see father Judas in this book and can only pray (to all the gods) he will crop up in the next book.

Thank you,

James Trethowan

A

I’m not sure if I’ll use that technique again . . . . as a rule I’m not fond of different voices in the same book, but I wanted some readers to worry that Uhtred senior was no longer with us. And Judas will return . . .

 


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Q

Hi.

Thank you for the best set of books ever .

I do and yet should I not adore the character of Ultred.

There is just something about this man that I would like to "know" in real life, Now that is scary.

But Thank you for bringing him into our reading lives.

 

My question. is

Will you ever do any writing with just  A warrior Queen or Lady Warrior in.?

I feel its the one thing that is now missing.

You may have written one already, but Ive not found one.

Can you let me know if there is one. Or if you have contemplated writing a soul Warrior female book.?

 

Other thing is. Please tell me this is not the last Uhtred book?

Please No!

Looking forward to receiving mine next week.

You are one amazing Author.

Regards

 

Gwyn Penny[Mrs]

A

Will I write a book with a warrior queen as the main character? I don’t know! Maybe? I try to have strong female characters, but so far I haven’t made one the chief protagonist, but who knows?

There will be more to Uhtred's story!


Q

I have, in the past ten minutes, picked up my copy of The Empty Throne from Waterstones (they are just round the corner from my office), and I, being an insatiable Uhtred fan, am wondering how many more books there will be on his story.  I recall, possibly just after the release of Death of Kings, that you were asked this question and your reply was along the lines of "definitely seven, possibly ten". I've scanned the other questions and saw that at the beginning of October you mentioned in a reply that you needed "finish Uhtred", which implies at least a ninth book, yes?  I can't wait to leave work this afternoon and get reading, and now I shall leave you in peace! :-)

Su Bradley

A

There will be more!


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I have noticed an inconsistency in Æthelstan's age. I understand that for the purpose of the story, you moved his date of birth from about 893-895CE to 899CE (he's born shortly before Alfred dies in the 6th book of the series), but The Empty Throne is set in 911CE which would make him 12 rather than 9 as Uhtred says.

All in all, I would say each book in the series is better than the previous one and this is certainly the case with The Empty Throne as well. Brilliant story and I really enjoyed the prologue narrated by Uhtred Jr.

That being said, I have heard that your next book will be set in the late 16th century. Does that mean you will take a break from the Saxon Stories for a while? (I hope not, but then again I'll buy your next book either way).

Kind regards,

Gustav

A

Thank you! I sort of half knew that there was an inconsistency and left it because I rather like Uhtred not knowing how old he is . . . . we all keep a careful count, but I have a half suspicion that in the early middle ages (and before) it was easy to lose track. I spent years not knowing how old I was (didn’t care, but knew to within a couple of years) and it was only when I hit the big seven-oh that I found I couldn’t go on being oblivious. I’ll have to sort out Aethelstan’s age in the next book.

 

All true – but Uhtred’s is the next one after this.


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell,

I have just finished The Empty Throne and found that my favourite series just gets better and better with each book. I intended to visit your book signing in York but due to surgery I could not handle the train journey (so I will have to catch you next time). Athelstan is fast becoming a favorite character, especially his conversations with Uhtred. I have a small question if you can answer it; there are two characters that have not cropped up in a while? Haesten and Brida; are they assumed dead? (I hope they are both around for Brunanburh; Brida with her influence among the Northern Danes and Haesten the snake who always wriggles free).

Thank you for your wonderful books (and do not listen to the wingers calling for Uhtred's story to come to a close; I would gladly buy and read as many more books as you can write!!!)

Nicolaas Nicholson

 

A

I think both will be back . . . .


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell

my name's Brad and greetings from Australia I just wanted to ask a quick question I don't think was touched on, in your Saxon novels religion is talked about quite a lot the church trying to steal land and extorting people for money and so on, and Uhtred's obvious dislike of the Catholics and exploring the concepts of Norse paganism, I'm just wondering if you had any feelings towards the modern Odinist/Asatru/Neopagan groups springing up worldwide the biggest being in Iceland I think. Do you think it all belongs in myths? Or is a modern reawakening a good thing?

Thanks for your time.

Brad Moloney

A

I know very little about it. I’m fairly sure that the ancient gods will be no more effective today than they were two thousand years ago, but if it makes their worshippers feel better? Why not?

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I have not only read but BOUGHT every single one of your books, often more than once as I give them as gifts. Thank you for many fine hours, days, months of pleasure. In the Saxon Tales, Uhtred very often refers to the building skills of the Romans, and laments that the Britons of his day cannot compete in this area. Do you have interest in Roman Britain or the Rome of republican/imperial times? I doubt you will start a new series, but I know you could have made a proper job of a Roman Britain series of novels. Thanks again.

Kevin Snell

A

Thank you but I really don't want to write the Roman period....I love it!  I want to read other writers' versions, not my own.

 

 


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I just finished reading my 40th "Bernard Cornwell" novel ! Moreover, I am eagerly awaiting "The Empty Throne" to be published in the US. Having a backlog of more than a dozen other titles written by you, I will have many more enjoyable years reading about Sharpe, Thomas, Campion, and Uhtred.

Now, my question is related to legacy and current aspirations in your fruitful writing career. Approaching 60 novels, and more than three decades of writing, do you have any "bucket list" items to cross off that have been sitting on the back-burner? Is there anything more you wish to accomplish as an author?

Thanks for the stories.

Best Regards,

Kyle

A

I do, but whether I’ll ever get to them? I need to finish Uhtred, I’ve promised myself at least one more Sharpe story, I’d like to go back to poor Starbuck, and how many more years do I have?


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Bernard,

I attended your session in Toronto yesterday, September 29th 2014.  It was witty, informative and as you intended slightly provocative.I do hope that poor Ethan does not experience a particularly gruesome death in your next book.  And hopefully Uhtred will not have to sacrifice another beloved canine companion. Unfortunately when you asked how I would like my copy of Waterloo inscribed, I choked.  Of course, I should have asked you to write 'fate is inexorable'. Can hardly wait to get the new Uhtred book when it becomes available and look forward to the promised sequel the following year.  At least at the moment I have Waterloo to read.

One highly subjective question.  Who do you prefer Forester's Hornblower, O'Brien's Aubrey or Fraser's Flashman?

Regards,

Dan

A

I don’t. I like them all, but in different ways. Hornblower has been an inspiration for so many writers – and TV producers! Startrek was originally pitched as ‘Hornblower in Space’! Jack Aubrey is amazingly wonderful when he’s at his best, while Flashman is inimitable. I wouldn’t want to rank them – it would be invidious


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

 

I just discovered you this year and I've been absolutely obsessed! I read the Uhtred series straight through--I could not stop. I just finished the Arthur trilogy and loved it and am very sad to see the last of Derfel. I've read 3 of 5 of the sailing books and really enjoyed them. I'm thrilled I have so many more books to read, although I feel quite guilty for neglecting the rest of the authors and books out there I've been meaning to read, but I'm having difficulty breaking away.

 

I really, really hope you will do a book event in the US when The Empty Throne comes out. I live in NYC so that seems reasonable! Also, will Waterloo be published in the US, or no?

 

One last comment--please encourage your publisher to do UNABRIDGED audio versions of your books that are available in the US! They seem to be doing so with the later Uhtred books, but none of them were available for the Arthur trilogy and it's touch and go with the other books.

 

Thank you, I hope we'll be reading a heap more for years to come!

 

Sincerely,

 

Jennifer Hinckley

A

I don't have a book tour currently planned for the USA.  But my non-fiction book Waterloo:  The History of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles will be published in the USA in May 2015.


Q

Dear Bernard,

Having read all your historical novels, (my favourite is Sharpe), and in eager anticipation of the release of Waterloo, I did some 'prep', by reading Johnny Kincaid's two books and Edward Costello's memoirs.

Having read at least four factual novels on Waterloo, plus An Infamous Army and, of course Sharpe's Waterloo, I was curious as to how your book would go.

Well it duly arrived on my Kindle whilst I was sunning my self in the South of France, so I put down Vol. 2 of General Napier's History of the Peninsular War and went straight to it.

Within the first twenty pages I was learning stuff I didn't know, which was a good start, after which I couldn't put it down, and within three days it was done.

I think you have covered the battle, and the controversies surrounding it in a masterful and succinct manner in your own inimitable style. After all, how many writers in a factual book, would use the expression 'frenchified' when describing Boney's change of name? Excellent.

I shall be looking forward to the next Uhtred story and hopefully another Sharpe in the not to distant future. Keep up your brilliant work.

Regards

 

John Hill

 

Have you read Napier's History? He's not one to sit on the fence when it comes to an opinion, particularly about our Spanish allies.

 

A

I have indeed – a most robust man!


Q

Dear Bernard,

 

You are easily my favorite author of historical fiction, and I've been reading history and historical fiction since you and I were about 10 or 11 years old. I've read most of your history-based novels (Uhtred's saga, the Grail Quest series, Azincourt, The Fort) and thought they were excellent. The Warlord Chronicles are a superb and highly plausible retelling of the Arthurian legends (and I say this as a student of medieval literature!).

However, my favorite series is the one that recounts the adventures of Richard Sharpe. I discovered the Sharpe novels soon after developing an interest in (my wife would say obsession with) the military career of the Duke of Wellington, and I'm intrigued by the relationship between these two men.

I noticed recently on your website that no one has yet correctly identified Sharpe's father. To me the most logical answer is C. S. Forester. You've stated that you started writing about Sharpe because you wanted to do for Wellington's army what Forester's Hornblower novels did for Nelson's navy. And there are several tributes to  Forester in your work. Rifleman Matthew Dodd, for example. And the British naval lieutenant named Forester in The Fort. Plus, the fact that Sharpe participates in the battle of Trafalgar, which Hornblower missed, is a major tribute in itself.

If I'm wrong, I'll quietly wipe the egg off my face while I'm waiting for your account of Waterloo to arrive from the UK. I'll have more questions another day. In the meantime, Keep up the Great Work!

 

Bill Forsman

A

It’s a terrific answer and in one sense it’s right – but in a larger sense wrong. Thank you!


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

My name is Andreas Schneider, I am 24 years old and I study English and Spanish in Essen, Germany. I have just finished "The last kingdom" and first of all I wanted to thank you for writing such a thrilling and entertaining series of novels set in one of my favourite historic epochs, the Viking Age. I have already ordered "The pale horseman" and I cannot wait to read more about Uhtred's and the other protagonists' lives.

 

I have two questions, though, which are connected to two comments the narrator Uhtred makes on Norse Mythology. First, on page 259 he states that "the world was made by Thor from the carcass of Ymir". But wasn't the earth created by Odin and his two brothers Vili and Vé in Norse Mythology? I am not an expert on the subject, just an interested student, but I have never read "your" version of this event. The second question deals with a similar subject. On page 302/303 it is said that "Ran was Njord's wife", although I only know of sources where she is described as the giant Aegir's wife (whereas Njörd's wife, as far as I know, is the giantess Skadi). I know that sometimes in Norse Mytholgy we lack definite knowledge, but I always thought these two cases to be relatively clear.

 

I really do not want to be a small-minded bother debating with you on "stupid little details", I just thought that maybe you, as a succesful author, might have knowledge or sources about Norse Mythology that I do not possess, and then I would really like to be enlightened by you.

 

Again, I much enjoyed reading the first novel of the series!

 

Best regards,

Andreas Schneider

A

I’m not sure I can enlighten you – there are various versions and most of the information comes late (and from Icelandic sources, which is fine, but may have mutated over the years) and I just pick from whatever contradiction I like!  I’m probably not consistent . . . mea culpa.

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

I am very fond of your writing, especially, your Viking Warrior series. The character Uhtred jumps off the page for me and I enjoy his humor. I would like to know how you research your books and do you set up a timeline or an outline as I had to do for my master's thesis for my graduate degree in American History. I am curious as to how you devise your plots in your books and how they actually form the book. I know you are busy and I do not expect a long answer I would just like to know how you approach your writing.

Respectfully,

Darlene Perry, Havre de Grace, Maryland, USA.

 

A

An outline?  No, I don't.  I have a very broad idea of where I want the book to go, then just let the characters sort it out amongst themselves.  I'm not saying this is the right way to do it - some writers plot very carefully, and their books are great, but others, like me, leave it to instinct.

 

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

 

I have read and enjoyed all your books, particularly the Sharpe series and the Warlord series.

 

My question is do you expect to write and have published the last novel about Uhtred in the relatively near future as I am getting on in years and, if you do not mind me saying, you are no longer a youngster. I do not want either of us to miss the conclusion of a series I have enjoyed reading and  I am sure you have enjoyed writing.

 

Best regards,

 

Ian Michelmore

A

The last novel?  That has to be a few years away, maybe five or six? I take your point, though, so maybe I should accelerate the tale?

 


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

First off, I love your books. I've read all of the Saxon Tales (which are totally bad-ass) and am a complete fan.

I, unfortunately, have to point out an inconsistency.  In Book 4 (I believe) Uhtred and Gisela are about to have their third child. The oldest son is named Uhtred and when the third child, a son, named Osbert is born, Gisela dies giving birth.

In The Pagan Lord, Uhtred is outraged by his son Uhtred's becoming a priest that he strips him of his name and calls him Judas. Osbert then becomes Uhtred.

Then, when Uhtred and his youngest son Uhtred are taking the fort at Ceaster the son speaks in Danish, which Uhtred (the father) explains he learned from Gisela. How could that be true when Gisela died giving birth to him?

I am so sorry to bother you, but my wife told me to write you so that I stop bothering her about this :) Love your books, and keep writing,

Sean

 

A

Your wife is entirely right!  Stop bothering her!  It was my mistake!

 


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Q

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading all of the Sharpe series as well as the Saxon stories with Uhtred, plus several of your other books such as Stonehenge, the Harlequin series, and The Fort.  I recently finished reading The Fields of Death by Simon Scarrow, and was pleasantly surprised to see a reference to a major from the 95th Rifles named Richard, unusually for an officer carrying a rifle at the battle of Salamanca.  Not sure if this was an intentional show of respect to your famous character but interesting all the same.

Jim M

A

I suspect it’s a reference! How very kind of him!


Q

I've just finished your seventh novel of the Saxon Tales: "The Pagan Lord".  Don't know if that ends Uhtred's involvement, or if there will be another chapter of his life.  I'm a big fan of yours and have all of your books in my library.  My favorites are Stonehenge and Agincourt.  Also the Sharpe Novels, The Nathan Starbuck Chronicles,  Redcoat, etc.

Thanks,

Dick Stacey,

Lake Mary, Florida

A

There is more!  The next book is The Empty Throne.  It will be published in the UK in October of this year and in the US in January 2015.


Q

I am a huge fan of the Saxon Tales series. I have read the books and I also have the audio book versions of the books which I listen to on my ride to and from work with much enjoyment.

 

It seems that the pronunciations of the character's names differ from audio reader to audio reader. One reader pronounces Uhtred as OOH-TRED and another speaks it as YOU-TRED. Similarly, they pronounce Steapa as STAY-APPA and as STEEPA. There are a variety of other such differing enunciations but could you clarify what you believe to be the correct enunciation of Uhtred? Thank you and hope Uhtred never grows too old!

Jeffrey Warren

A

To rhyme with hoot, but with a slight guttural inflection - oot-red.

 

 


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Mr. Cornwell

 

As so many others have said I really look forward to The Empty Throne. The on going saga of Uhtred has become one of my favorite series. One of the aspects that I enjoy is your battles. I can see the men and smell the death. How did you come by the knowledge to so accurately describe them? Most of the histories that I have read were woefully short on good detail of the tacits used. You so accurately portray combat and the aftermath that I now judge others by your accounts. Purchance may we sometime see one of your tales in Germany or with the Germans coming to the British Isles to become the English? Thank you for so much enjoyment and that to come.

 

R L v Beichler

A

I have to say that most of it imagination, but fed with a lot of reading of military memoirs, histories and, of course, conversations with men who have endured the ordeals of battle. I suspect the nearest I’ll come to the Germanic invasion of Britain is all in the three Arthurian books!

 


Q

I'm thrilled, but also filled with trepidation to see that the Last Kingdom is being adapted for TV. I was wondering to what extent you were going to be involved in the adaptation? Hopefully this could be the start of a long running series, I wonder who will be cast as Uhtred!!

Andy Holt

A

My involvement will be limited - mostly cheerleading!  I wonder too....


Q

Dear Bernard,

Like many I'm absolutely delighted to hear that Carnival will be translating The Last Kingdom in to a TV Series for the BBC.  Probably like may of your fans I've been watching Game of Thrones (and Vikings) and telling my friends "I wish someone would take those same production values and make a series of The Warrior Chronicles, it would make for such an epic story arc telling of Uhtred and Alfred... but I suppose it will never happen!"  So glad to be proved wrong.  However I have a two part question.

 

The press release says "set in the year 872" but the story starts before and goes after that time.  I'm intrigued as to how they will break the book up in to episodes.  What will the focus on.  How quickly will they cover Uhtred's early life?

 

So, why don't you want to have any involvement in the adaptation?  And why don't Carnival want your input to help satisfy the books fans that they will keep to the spirit of the book?  George R. R. Martin is invloved with Game of Thrones.  Diana Gabaldon is involved with Outlander.  This fan certainly believes the series would be better with you involved.

 

By the way, it's a close thing between the Arthur series and Uhtred's story for your best writing and story telling, but the sweep of the Saxon stories edges it in my opinion.  Can't wait till the pre-order hits my Kindle to read the next chapter.

Regards,

David Terrar

St. Albans

A

These are questions I can’t answer! I take the view that the TV producers know their business (and I don’t know their business) so I let them get on with it and don’t ask questions.  I worked in television long enough to know that I know nothing about producing TV drama, and any input from me is liable to be either a distraction or an obstacle. If they have questions then they can ask me and I’ll answer, but otherwise I leave well alone.

 


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Q

Congratulations on having Carnival Films decide to create a series based on Uhtred.

 

However, doesn't this create a problem in that you have not yet finished Uhtred's story?

 

Does this mean that you will have to write faster or that you will finish it earlier than expected resulting in less of these outstanding books being published?

Dan McGarry

A

It really isn’t a problem. So far as I know the first series just deals with the first book? So there’s time for me to finish (I hope!)

 


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Q

Thoroughly enjoying the story of Uhtred it's a very close second to the warlord chronicles. Can you give me a clue as to what piece of British history might be in the pipeline for a future story

David Edgell

A

I’m thinking of a story or two set towards the end of Elizabeth I’s reign – we’ll see!


Q

Hello,

I was just wondering if you have been able to watch the History channel's new tv show 'vikings' following Ragner Lothbrok and whether good reviews from this may find a market for a show or even better a movie series following Uhtred?

Thanks

Pat

 

I've just this moment read that The Last Kingdom is to be televised. Could this be true? huzzah and hozzanah! Is this something that Vikings has enabled, along with GoT? Anyway, that's awesome news. I'm almost as happy as when they announced Episode VII. Could this eventually lead to the Warlord trilogy being televised?

Thankee

Ser Phillpy

 

Very excited to read today that BBC America will be filming the Last Kingdom - be very interested to see who is cast as Uhtred (and if they find a role for Sean Bean).  Have you any preferences for who will play Uthred?

Roy

 

Dear Bernard

I wish you congratulations on the Last Kingdom becoming a TV show.

https://uk.celebrity.yahoo.com/news/game-thrones-scared-bbc-set-rival-hbo-drama-145832199.html

Who would you like to be Uthred, myself I think Philip Glienster would be perfect for older Uthred.

Also a previous poster asked about the Benous Aires expedition. There is a good book called Waters of Oblivion by Ian Fletcher on the subject he might like.

Yours sincerely

Geraint

 

Dear Mr Cornwell

Just noticed on a comingsoon.com that The Saxon Chronicles are to be made into a TV series.  Great news, hope they do the books justice.

Any news on other filmed projects?

Thanks for your time, Alex.

A

I'll leave the casting up to the experts!

Don't know if this will lead to any more films....time will tell!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

 

I just want to thank you for the many hours of entertainment you've provided me.  You are a terrific author, now one of my favorites actually, and your characters and stories are so realistic and enthralling.  All of this and I've not yet even started the Sharpe series, so I look forward to more hours of reading. I have thoroughly enjoyed the Warlord series, Grail Quest and Saxon Tales to date.

 

I have a couple questions:

 

1.  Will there be any more Grail Quest books beyond 1356?

 

2.  Between Derfel and Uhtred, in your opinion, who is the better warrior and why?  They seem so similar are terrific characters and have such great stories.  Doesn't have to be a long explanation, I'm just curious.

 

Thank you and may you have many, many years of writing ahead of you!!

Jeff Roberts

A

I am not planning on adding to the Grail Quest books.

They're as good as each other, which is all you'll get from me!


Q

I love Uhtred and have followed him through all of his adventures. I just received Martin Jensen's Oathbreaker for review. Imagine my surprise when the prologue featured an Uhtred that seems to be the same as the one in your books. Is your Uhtred based on a real character? If so, I am furious that through Jensen's book, I know his outcome which is nothing like I had in my head.  is it just a coincidence?

Susan Johnson

A

There was indeed a man called Uhtred – several, in fact – who were the lords of Bebbanburg, so Martin Jensen has as much right to him as I do!

 


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

 

I think it's the third time that I write some questions about your books in general. I'm waiting anxiously for "The Pagan Lord" here in Brazil (to buy it, because I've already read it in english) and for the publication of "The Empty Throne". Will you grant us a sneak peak of it? And when?

 

Also, I'm re-re-reading the Saxon Stories, and I've got some questions of "The Last Kingdom". They are about some details that I hadn't realized before:

 

1 - When Uhtred (half brother of the protagonist), goes to spy the Danes, his father orders him to take a dozen man. So he goes in a band of THIRTEEN warriors. It was a foreshadowing of Uhtred's death?

2 - When Uhtred (the protagonist) goes to war with his father, Aelfric gives him a helmet with a band of gilt bronze, "So they know you are a prince". The question is: Aelfric was already planning for Uhtred to die by giving him a helmet that draws attention of the enemies? Or am I seeing to much?

3 - In the first book, Uhtred says one day he will take back Bebbanburg. However, in a later book he says he's inside the strongest fort of Northern England (presumably Bebbanburg). So he takes Bebbanburg after he starts writing the chronicles? And when he does it?

 

Sorry if I'm being too inquisitive with hard questions, but that's what happens when there's no new books to read :\ Please, urge the publishers in Brazil to publish all your books here (most of Sharpe and all Starbuck books are still missing a brazilian version)! And thank you for all your incredible books!

Ronnie Junior

A

I don’t think you’re seeing too much!  And remember, the books are being narrated by a man in extreme old age so, yes, there will be hints of what is to come – so does he eventually retake Bebbanburg? Wait and see (or follow the hints)...


Q

Mr Cornwell,

 

I am a keen student of Mythology. Your Saxon series has been most refreshing, and your stance of having the protagonist a Pagan in a Christian world really lifts the novel, by giving more colour and depth to the subtext of the drama.

 

My favourite novel was the first in the Series: The Lost Kingdom, as I felt that it explored the Pagan themes the most deeply. I hope you went to the British Museum to see the Viking Exhibition recently, perhaps there was some treasure of Uhtred's there? I liked to think so. I sincerely hope you continue this fine series, and explore Norse Mythology more. I get the impression if you yourself were in the novel, you would be a Pagan over Christian - am I right in that?

 

Thank You,

Stefan Page

A

I didn’t have the opportunity to visit the exhibition, so did the next best thing which was to get the catalogue. It was very impressive!


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell

It should be taken for granted that I am a huge fan and the pleasure and education I have received from your novels are much appreciated.

Whilst I'm delighted that BBC are making Uhtred into a series I am also concerned about how this will vary from the books and the comparison to Game of Thrones (I understand the reason). Could you please let us know what your input/influence will be as this would reassure me of a sound grounding for the series.

As regards casting - I'm so glad Paul McGann broke his leg for Sharpe, but who do you think for Uhtred

May you continue to make me dream of being a hero

Andy OB

 

I'm delighted to see that the BCC are making a series of your excellent Uthred books.  Purely out of my own selfish interest will you have any input into this or will you just admire from the distance and count the richly deserved royalties!!  If you're not involved will you have sleepless nights that the Beeb might make a mess of it, which I'm sure they won't?

Lastly, many thanks for countless hours of enjoyment reading your wonderful books.

Andy Hampshaw

 

Dear Bernard

Just seen today's annoucement that the BBC will begin filming The Last Kingdom in the autumn.

After the success of the Sharpe films I am sure this series will be equally successfully and perhaps will give Game of Thrones a run for its money.

Best wishes

Steven

 

Excellent news today concerning the BBC's forthcoming show The Last Kingdom. Will you have anything to do with the production?  If only to keep the Beeb on the historical straight and narrow ....

Pyers Symon

 

Mr. Cornwell,

I just read an article which claims that the BBC is planning to adapt The Saxon Stories for a new television series. Can you confirm or deny that!?

Much appreciated,

Eric Clay

A

I’m delighted to confirm it, and no, I won’t have anything to do with the production! Carnival Films, who make Downton Abbey, will shoot the series for the BBC and they don’t need any advice from me!  I like to think I know a thing or two about writing stories, but I know nothing about producing television drama, so the best thing is to stay away and let the experts do what they do best!

 


Q

Hi Bernard,

May I start by saying I absolutely love your writing and chase all the sharp series on DVD too.

My favourite of all are the warrior chronicles to date and I am nearly finished book 6 now with book 7 staring at me waiting to be read.

I know it's a small silly question but of all I have read I wondered why Uhtred sacrificed his dog instead of waiting to see if the priest could clear the spirits from the cave first.  Was is as simple as to do that was to recognise the Christian faiths power?  Being a huge dog lover - and at present at 4am sitting with my puppy ashes wouldn't sleep I can't even imagine the pain that would have caused to kill your favourite and shocked me so thought I would.

Probably the most trivial question ever sorry!

Your books make my journey to and from the city of London to work pleasure instead of the hell they could be and I have nearly missed my stop on  ore than one occasion as I get so engrossed.

Kind regards

Gill

A

It’s not trivial at all, and my dog is looking at me with a very worried expression as I write this!  The point of the death is that the religion demanded a sacrifice with real meaning, and if the loss doesn’t hurt then it won’t be effective. He’s using belt and braces, yes. He might have waited to see if Christian sorcery worked, but his own gods would have disapproved of that exercise of cynicism, so, alas


Q

I'm a huge fan of yours and I live in Brasília (Brazil). I have a lot of your books and I saw here that the Saxon Stories 7 was distributed last year in English. Could you told me (if you know or if there is that information) when "The Pagan Lord" will be translated to Portuguese and the sells will start from your brazilians fans? Thank you for your time and sorry about my poor english.

Roberto Amorim

 

Hello dear Bernard Cornwell !!
Well, forgive me my english (I'm brazilian and unfortunately not speak English)
I would say that "Saxon Chronicles" was and is for me the best saga / story already written! The story is very engaging and would like to thank the sensational readings that gave me (and also all Brazilians!)
I am anxiously awaiting the release here in Brazil the "Pagan Lord" (scheduled for 6/30/14)
Anyway, I wonder how many books over the series write in "Saxon Chronicles" and also the story that will follow, will have a death of Uhtred Uhtredsson / Ragnarsson and still continue the story (for example, told by his son after the death of Uhtred) .... I'm a big fan of yours, and if possible I would like you to answer or at least give me some idea about it .... Thank you for your attention Mr., anxiously await their response and hope to read soon "Pagan Lord" ....
Sincerely, your fan, Carlos Augusto

 

Dear Bernard Cornwell,
You are a most great wonderful writer if i know, and i'm your fan.
I read all the six books sold in Brazil, and i loved the history. Uhtred is "the man"!
So, and now?  I'm hungry!!!!
Please, say, when The Pagan Lord will be sold in Brazil?

Thanks for writing books, keep it up, thank their fans heart.

Gustavo Gomes

A

I think you are correct - The Pagan Lord - should be available in Brazil next week.  Sorry!  I still don't know how many books will be in this series!


Q

Okay, I reread the Saxon Tales.  Uhtred is as old as I am.  When can we finish the story?

Jerome Parker

 

What is the name of the title that follows Pagan Lord?
Thanks

John Kelley

 

When will the next book in the Saxon Stories about Uhtred come out??

Glen Alexander

A

The next book of Uhtred's tale will be The Empty Throne.  It will be published in the UK on 26 October 2014 and in the US on 6 January 2015.


Q

I'd like to start the email with something that I'm sure you've heard countless times: I really like your books. I'm trying to write a book too, even if it's more a hobby (because I really enjoy doing it) than an attempt to get it published. I'm writing in norwegian, a language that I know much better than english (this is a nice way to apologize for my imperfect english). I hope I'm not pushing any of the limits that you have enlisted above, like telling you about my plot or plot twists, but I hoped you could give me some simple advice. My manuscript starts with a battle, and the outcome is crucial for the rest of the story and character development, but somebody has pointed out that starting a book with a battle is a weird thing to do, so I was wondering if you think that such a thing is possible. The other thing is about the storytelling itself. I really enjoyed reading about Uhtred from his perspective, but for my book I was thinking about having several characters telling the story, maybe by giving the main characters two or three chapters each, but I'm not sure if such a thing could work.

Once again, I hope I'm not pushing any of the limits.

Hope to hear from you soon.

Stefano Dell'Aitante

A

What’s wrong with starting with a battle? Lots of my books do! Whoever told you that was a bad idea is wrong. But – telling a story from different points-of-view? Some writers do that and can make it work, but my feeling is that readers don’t like it. You get used to a voice and it’s a wrench to suddenly abandon a voice you’ve become used to and accustom yourself to a new one. Maybe that’s my personal prejudice?


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Q

I really enjoy historical fiction, and have loved both the characters and story lines of your Uhtred and Sharpe books.  I am amazed at the number of volumes you have produced and the historic detail that you bring to the reader.  Can you share with us a sense of how you go about your research efficiently and who your team members are who help carry the research and accuracy burden?

PS - I can't wait until January's for your next Uhtred release.

Tony Gogan

A

My team? There’s a wonderful assistant who looks after the website, deals with the mail, finds me repairmen, and generally does everything except research and write the books (she’s not perfect, maybe one day I can persuade her to do the writing too), and there’s my wife, who is a support beyond words, but again won’t do the work for me. Then there’s my dog, Whiskey, who keeps me happy. Other than that I do my own research and my own writing. Once in a while, but not often, I’ll have a researcher’s help, usually if it’s a field where I simply don’t have the time to fillet a vast number of sources, but I do 90% of my own research. Efficiently? Oh, I wish!


Q

Is there going to be a follow up to 'The Pagan Lord? (God I hope so)
I have never had so much more fun, then reading The Saxon Chronicles. I'm hopeful  Uhtred see's a England under 1 banner before he dies. My guess is as Uhtred ages he slips into the role of a Field General, watching the flanks & orchestrates massive army rather then being up front in a shield wall. (Age will catch up to you)
Oh, I was rooting for him when he 'almost' captured Bebbanburg.....Those Damn Dogs...! Fun Stuff.

Mike Armstrong

A

Thank you! And you’re right . . . .mostly

 

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell
There is one thing that still puzzles me, regarding Alfred The Great. As you have beautifully explained in Uhtred series, it was Alfred who had set the foundations for united England. But why "England" and "Angelcynn"? Why not "Saxoncynn"? After all, Alfred himself was West Saxon, and he ruled Wessex. Plus Wessex was free and fighting while much of the the territories settled by Angles were devastated and conquered by the Northmen. Maybe Alfred was trying to make the idea of unity attractive to suffering Angles, therefore "Angelcynn"? Or is there something else to it? Once again, thank you for your time and patience.

Miroslav Subašić

A

I’ve no idea! It just so happens that the Saxons spoke ‘English’ instead of ‘Saxon’.


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Dear Mr.Cornwell,

I'm a fan of your historical books. The last I read was The Pagan Lord (Der Heidenfürst).My question to you will there be another book in this volume or should it end with the death or the life of Uhtred?
Thank you for answering.

Yours sincerely
Frank Richter

 

 

Hi
Enjoyed this series and would like to know if there will be another after The Pagan Lord to see how Uhtred continues his life after the defeat of the Danes by Edward.
Hope you not ended with The Pagan Lord
Regards
Arthur

 

Thanks for the great work that you do!  I really enjoy your books especially the Saxon Series.  Are you planning on writing another book in this series to follow Pagan Lord?  It seemed from the ending of Pagan Lord that this might be possible but I wasn't sure.
Thanks,
Javier Manrique

A

I am writing the next book of Uhtred's story - The Empty Throne.  It will be published in the UK in October and in the US in January.


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,
I am a reader of most of your books and especially find the Saxon Tales to be wonderfully written. Your descriptive passages and battle scenes are so vivid and the dry humor dialogues are witty and never fail to ring a chuckle as I read them.

In the new book, The Pagan Lord you used a phrase "Wyrd bið ful aræd". This appears to have been used in different cultures with varying meanings and I would like to know the translation you intend in the book.
I do hope it does not signify the end of this wonderful series. Uhtred has become one of my favorite fictional protagonists.
Thank you for your time with this question and for the many hours of good reading.
Best Regards,
Gail Carroll

A

 It comes from an Old English poem, 'The Wanderer', which is very beautiful and rather sad, and is the thoughts of an exile wandering the earth. In the original the phrase would have sounded something like 'Wyrd bith ful arade' which is English, believe it or not, and is usually translated as 'fate is relentless', but I preferred inexorable. If you can find a copy then you'll find the quote at line 5.


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I have just completed the Warrior series and have been completely riveted to them reading all in about a 6 month period.
Having just finished Pagan Lord I noted that the ending suggests another book about Uhtred. Do you have any idea when this might be published.
With kind regards and sincere gratitude for the enjoyment I have had reading this series.
Paul Mohan

 

 

When will the next book after The Pagan Lord come? I can't wait to find out how Lord Uhtred survives. I love these books and I can't wait for the conclusion of Uhtred's amazing life. You have created an awesome and remarkable man in Lord Uhtred. I do hope you, unlike George R.R.Martin, will soon conclude your tale. I used to be a fan of Martn until he never completed his story. After awhile his books just drone on and on and on forever.

Dottie Howell

 

Mr. Cornwell,
I am a huge fan of yours and truly enjoy the stories about Uhtred. Your last book, The Pagan Lord, hinted at Uhtred's death when he envisioned Gisela. But the last sentence in the Historical Note mentioned he would live for the last battle. I would like to know which is true and if you are going to prepare another fascinating story. As a big reader i like to focus on one series before reading another.
Regards,
Jack Erbey

A

I am close to finishing the next book of Uhtred's story.  It's to be called The Empty Throne and will be published in the UK in October and in the US in January.


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,
I cannot begin to describe how much pleasure I have gotten from your books, especially the Saxon Tales, which I came to later in life. Many years ago I studied Anglo Saxon England and the Old English language. It has been wonderful to get back to it without having to worry about a final exam. You have mentioned in your notes that you have a distant ancestor by the name of Uhtred. I have just finished reading the book Bloodfeud by Richard Fletcher describing several generations of killing set off in Northumbria by the murder of an Earl Uhtred in the 11th century. Was this your distant ancestor? Thank you again for all your wonderful books. I look forward to reading many more in the future.

Mara Hardy

A

That’s the same family – descended from the Uhtreds who owned Bebbanburg. Fletcher’s wonderful book describes how the family lost the fortress in (if I recall rightly) 1016. About ten years ago I met the present owner and said that in all honour he should return the castle to me and he said ‘let me show you the heating bills’. He still owns it!

 


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Good day Bernard
I stumbled across the audio book for Death Of Kings and loved it. It was my first exposure to this genre and really enjoyed it. I immediately followed that up with the audio book of Pagan Lord.
After listening to both books I was a bit confused about something
I have a few questions about the pronunciation of certain names in the two audiobooks. In Death of Kings the narrator pronounces Uhtred's name as Youtred while the The Pagan Lord lord the narrator pronounces it as Oohtred. Similarly in Death Of Kings the narrator refers to the main character as Uhtred of  "Bambrah" (not sure of spelling as I listen to the audio version). However in The Pagan Lord the narrator refers to Uhtred as hailing from "Bebbanburg".
I am a bit confused as to why there are different pronunciations. Is it because the narrators are different and have their own ideas of how to pronounce these words?
Please advise
Thanks and keep up the great writing.

Ebrahim Hyder

A

Uhtred - to rhyme with hoot, but with a light guttural inflection - oot-red.  And, of course, it should be Babbanburg!  I can only guess you are right - different narrators have different interpretations!


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Dear Sir ,
I have read all your Warrior Chronicles, Grail Quest series,Gallows Thief,Stonehenge and Azincourt. I retired recently and have read and enjoyed them all over again. Have you a rough idea when we can look forward to the next....Warrior Chronicles...no pressure !!!
Any chance of a Sharpe type series on tv, with Uhtred. Time will tell?
Thanking you in anticipation
Colin Burrell  ..

A

Yes, you are right...time will tell...

The next book of the Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories will be The Empty Throne, scheduled to be published in the UK in October and in the US next January.


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I have really enjoyed reading this latest series of books from the start. I first started with the Sharpe series and was hooked. Never thought that I would enjoy a historical type of novel, but guess I was wrong, and in turn it has also broadened my authors of choice, so not all bad. When is the next Warrior book in thye series out as at the moment I can find no information on it??
Gerry

 

 

When will the next book in this series come out?  I hope you're writing one now.   I love this series.

Barbara Kelly

 

 

I just wanted to say a quick thank you for all of your wonderful books. I just finished "The Pagan Lord". I would also like to thank you for not killing Uhtred. When do you think we will be able to look for the next installment?

Gordon Broussard

A

The next book of Uhtred's tale, to be called The Empty Throne, will be published in the UK in October of this year and in the US in January 2015.


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I just finished "The Pagan Lord."  When it looked like Uhtred might actually re-take Bamburgh I was so happy!  I actually thought, if I never get to read another Saxon story I can die happy, knowing he re-took his birthright.  And then he didn't!  On Uhtred's behalf, I'm going to be might angry with you if he doesn't succeed in a future book.  (As you can tell, I'm hopelessly addicted.)

By the way, I listen to them as audiobooks, and different readers pronounce Uhtred's name differently.  Is it Uhh-tred (the u as in "butter"), Oo-tred (the u as in "Yule"), or is the U pronounced like oo in "look" (which seems most likely to me, but what do I know)?

Many thanks for the hours of pleasure you have given me.

Lenore Garon

A

To rhyme with hoot, but with a slight guttural inflection - oot-red.


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Dear Mr Cornwell -

thanks for your superb efforts in promoting our history - if only history was taught like this in schools... I look forward to a continuation of the Uhtred series through to the all too short reign of Athelstan and hope you will carry it forward to the Norman 'conquest' in much the same manner as the Uhtred tale picks up the threads from the Arthurian series...?

I believe that the Danes, Saxons, Angles and Jutes were all closely related groups emanating from the same area of Europe / Scandinavia and that even the Normans before they settled in France also formed part of this largely Scandinavian people who migrated to Engaland over a period of some 500 years.  Do you have any views on this or do you see them as quite distinct peoples with entirely different cultures?

many thanks - I really love your work,

John

A

I fear I won’t live nearly long enough!  You’ll probably have to be content with an end date of 937 which really marks the creation of a unified English state.

 

I don’t have any particular views – except, yes, those groups are all culturally and, to a lesser extent, linguistically related, so they seem to have assimilated fairly easily (the English, after all, are probably a third Danish). They also shared a common religion, which was eroded by Christianity.


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Hello Mr. Cornwell,
I have been reading your material since I was in my early 20's. I believe the first book of yours that I read was the Winter King and I have been hooked since. I am dying to ask about one scene in the Saxon Chronicles though. I believe it is early in the second book, The Pale Horseman, where Uhtred is forced to grovel on his knees to the king. Did you intend for that scene to be so funny? Or did it just kinda come out that way? It does seem slightly out of place in regards to the overall tone and feel of the rest of the series, which is the only reason I ask. The comic relief there is seriously one of my favorites of all the reading I have ever done, if not the absolute favorite. I shared the series with my dad, who also thought it was hilarious and we still mention it to this day each time you release a new installment in the series.  And to top it off, my wife also thought it was hysterical. To take up just a few more moments of your time, I have to tell you how she read it. She was sitting in one of my children's classrooms reading in the back. When she got to that scene she literally laughed out loud and had to excuse herself from the classroom because then the "you're not supposed to laugh, but I can't stop laughing" effect kicked in. I then got a text half chiding me for not preparing her for the scene, but only half :). Anyway, thank you for the quality books throughout the years. So long as you keep weaving the tales, my family and I will continue to read them.
Joe

A

I’m glad! It was meant to be funny . . . . .


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Hi Mr. Cornwell,

Your books have slayed A Song of Ice and Fire for me. I have shared The Warlord Chronicles/ Warrior Chronicles with everyone I know who has equally been blown away.

I have really been wondering who you could ever envision to play Uhtred, if something like that ever came to be. I would've gone through the other questions on the site but I decided to avoid all spoilers and just ask.

Thank you for making my life better with your words!

Jenn

A

Oh I have no idea (do you?)!  I'd be horrible at casting - I'll leave that to the experts!


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Hello Mr. Cornwell,
I've just got back from 3 weeks of being dragged around the south of Spain by my wife. I've read all your sharp books but nothing prepared me for the mountains. They're everywhere... So I think i'll read them again with the right scenery and architecture in mind.

Q. When you where plodding around Spain yourself visiting Salamanca and so on where you ever tempted to write something about the moors? I think that would be very exciting.

By the way, i reckon Uhtred is your best work. You've got us enjoying the goodies and the baddies! If you are ever in Finistere you are welcome to come round for a cup of tea.
Dan

A

No, because my interest was with Wellington’s army, and if I was to write about the Moors I’d need to do a decade’s worth of research into their society and I just didn’t (don’t) have the time, sorry!


Q

Can you please tell me if there is going to be a follow up to this book and if so when will it be released? I thoroughly enjoy reading  your books.
Many thanks
Nairn Wallace.

 

Mr Cornwell,
Thank you very much for your wonderful books. Once I start one I just cant put it down. I  just finished 'The Pagan Lord' and you left one of my favorite characters, Uhtred, in pretty bad shape (though I suspect he will recover). When might you expect the next book in this series to come out? Uhtred of Bebbanburg must return home one day. Again, thank you for ll of your works.

Jeff Jarvis

A

The next book, The Empty Throne, will be published in the UK in October and in the US next January.


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Recently finished The Pagan Lord and enjoyed it tremendously, as expected.  I am curious about the joke told to Uhtred by Cnut concerning the enjoyment of farts (your words, not mine).  I found it rather funny and have told it several times since then.  Is that a contemporary joke you inserted because you liked it, or is it actually a representative sample of what we know of Viking/Saxon humor in the first millennium?
Richard Bartholomew

A

I’m fairly certain that I found that joke in a history of jokes (and I don’t remember the name of the book) but it was a survey of humour through the ages, and that particular fart joke went back millennia! The one I liked recently was ‘Why do Morris dancers wear bells?’ answer, ‘so they can annoy the blind as well.’


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,
I especially liked the dialogue of the (almost) dying Uhtred in The Pagan Load with the bystanders… and with himself.
How long do you write on a book like this?
Your fighting scenes (this is not the main reason for reading your books) are so incredible realistic:  did you every train or learn martial arts like sword fighting?
Regards
Christian Zier

A

I didn’t train! It’s all imagination (and a lot of reading memoirs!).  The book took about 5 months to write.

 


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Mr. Cornwell,
My wife and I are about to embark on a 9 day vacation to Northern Wales and the Peak District with a one night stay in the Cotswalds. We will pass directly through Wolverhampton (Tettenhall) our way to Conwy and were wondering if anything was known of the actual location of the Battle of Tettenhall which you so beautifully described in The Pagan Lord? If so, we'd love to walk the ground and try to visualize Uhtred and his son working their magic on that momentous day! Thank you for your outstanding work as it has been the source of many hours of wonderful entertainment over the past decade.
Best Regards,
Michael Hanselman

A

Oh, I wish!  The river has gone (redirected and tamed and moved away) and most of it is now housing estates. I’d give it a miss! But you could visit Ethandun? That hasn’t changed! Look for the westbury White Horse (google?) and the battle was almost certainly fought on the hill above the horse.


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Dear Mr. Cornwell:

I discovered your Saxon stories a couple of years ago and read them all without stopping. I then agonized for a year for The Pagan Lord to be released. I have loved them all! You are a superb storyteller. Since I am of Danish heritage, your books have awakened my love of history, and I have been trying to read as much as I can about ancient Scandinavian history--actual and novelized. It is fascinating and wonderful. So thank you for that! I am partial to the Norse side as you can imagine. I'm glad Uhtred has remained pagan. I wonder if you have come across any novels about Canute the Great? I have searched to no avail. I think his story would make a wonderful novel. Thank you again for writing such terrific and exciting books. I'm looking forward to the next Uhtred and am thrilled it will be in January 2015. I will be sad when his story ends.

Best regards,
Lise

P.S. You should check out History channel's The Vikings. It's quite good; although, they aren't very good at shield walls yet. It's the story of Ragnar Lothbrok and his adventures. Since not a lot is exactly known about him, they've been able to play with the facts a bit. It makes it fun. Having read your books and with my own research, it's nice to know what is coming. I'm also able to explain to my son and husband how a shield wall should work!

A

I haven’t, I’m sorry – maybe someone else can recommend something?


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

My son, Chris, and I are avid readers of your stories, all of them, but especially Uhtred, friends and foes. I am sure that you contributed to his choice of film directing as what he loves to do. We are celebrating his graduation by a "lets go imagine we are having a skirmish here" trip to Northumberland first fortnight of this June, including Bebbanburg. We would love to know what are your favourite views, places and nooks inside or near Beb.
Thanks for your story telling,

Julie Lennox

A

Bamburgh Castle, obviously!  And don’t miss Lindisfarned (Holy Island), and I’m very find of Dunstanburgh Castle – a good coastal walk with magnificent views. Alnwick is worth a visit too! Enjoy!


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I love how the Frisians fought alongside the Viking raiders in The Pagan Lord, as they would have. But even more that you took Uhtred and his son out to open sea again (in one of their boats, Middelniht). There is something romantic and melancholic about the sea, and I'd love to read more about it. Will we see more sailing in your new Uhtred novel (and possibly the Elizabethan series you've announced)?

All the best!
René, The Netherlands

A

There isn’t much in the next Uhtred book – a little, but so far not a lot, and I won’t know about the new book till I write it! Thank you


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As a huge fan of the Saxon books and an English man of Danish descent believe it or not I'm really eager to know if you'll ever bring Uhtred to our TV screens? I really hope so because if it's even a fraction as good as Sharpe was then it'll be huge. Anyway, I look forward to "The Empty Throne" with as much anticipation as a kid on Christmas eve. Many thanks.
Perry Magnus Coulson

A

I would be happy to see it happen!  But I don't spend much time thinking about it.  Who knows?


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Hi BC,

Firstly I'd like to thank you for your brilliant novels - I'm a huge fan, I haven't read all of them yet, but I have read the Saxon stories, Azincourt and started the Hook series. All of which I thoroughly enjoyed and can't put down. I have recommended your books to several friends and they too have become addicts of your work.
I can't emphasise how much I love your character Uhtred. I know he is a fictional character in a non-fictional world, but these books have made me extremely interested in the Danes/Vikings and English history. I am from Australia, yet my heritage is English. I have recently travelled from Oz to England to celebrate my Grandmother's 100th birthday, and during my visit have been busy seeing historic places and events, one of which being the recent Vikings Exhibition at the British Museum. Thanks to you, I have become a history fanatic!
Because of the Saxon stories I took great interest in the recent television series Vikings (which I also thoroughly enjoyed yet it has had mixed reviews) and was wondering if you had seen it and what your thoughts are on it?
I am anxiously awaiting the next, possibly last, book about Uhtred and whether he regains Bebbanburg.
Cheers,
James Parker

A

I am afraid I have not seen the show.


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Dear Mr Cornwell,

I have enjoyed and read nearly every book you have written which means I have spent quite a lot of my hard earned cash on you, but it's been worth every penny. I have noticed in your various characters , but particularly Lord Uthred , my favourite ,you have a healthy disrespect for the Mumbo jumbo and the blatant hypocrisy of religion in general and Christianity in particular . Having been born a catholic I have a very similar scepticism of religion and wondered if this is a conscious decision on your part or merely a plot line that allows characters like Uthred and Sharpe to delineate their enemies better? I wondered if the thought process is based on a personal antipathy to the nonsense you and I (I am 56) were taught ,possibly indoctrinated in,when we were young children in the 50/60's? I do not intend to offend ,but like Uthred I see how the power of the "nailed god" has in many instances caused far more trouble than the good it's protagonists would profess is its purpose. Either way I am glad you project characters who ,in our world ,would struggle to avoid being labelled non PC at best,and who provide me a least ,with some laugh out loud moments.
Best Regards,

Paul Hartford

I have read most if not all your books, some more than once.  We have a little exchange group that includes that my oldest sons and my brother.  Your books are generally a good read.
I have just finished The Pagan Lord.  There is a fairly consistent thread in your books that seems to be anti-christian, although there is some ambivalence.  There is, for example, a recognition of the ascendancy of the Christian god.
Other authors have also written about the passing of the 'old gods' in favour of the 'white Christ' or as Uhtred describes him, the 'nailed god.' There seems to be no reason that accounts for this change in fundamental world view.
How does one account for it?  I am left to wonder why such an unattractive god, represented generally by even more unattractive proponents, should have gained the ascendancy.  The implicit reasons that appear in your writings seem to be that there is some vague power play on the part of unpleasant, intolerant priests that accounts for it. In the light that you are writing historical novels where a certain fidelity to the history in question is embraced, I wonder that this aspect of your stories is not more nuanced.   I would suggest that one of several books by Rodney Stark would help to account for the rise of Christianity.  Here are several titles, The Victory of Reason, The Rise of Christianity, The Triumph of Christianity.  For a somewhat different take but one that has the added dimension of being written by someone who has deep roots in the culture of India as well as a solid experience of the West, may I recommend Vishal Mangalwadi's The Book that Made Your World.
You have a wonderful gift.  Thanks for sharing it with us all.
Cordially
Phil Delsaut

A

I wrote an essay on this which  was published on Amazonblogs and can be found here (http://www.omnivoracious.com/2013/12/the-path-to-christianity-by-bernard-cornwell.html)

To paraphrase it swiftly . . . . . Christianity had a wider appeal (the old Norse religions didn’t offer women any kind of decent after-life), it was also seen as profitable; there’s a tale of Edwin of Northumbria giving the Christian god a chance to prove that he could deliver lots of plunder and success in war (and Jehovah came through), and missionaries played up that aspect. One Pope encouraged raising the rents of anyone who refused to convert (that’ll work!). I’m not sure I entirely take your point, I suspect unpleasant, intolerant priests had a hell of a lot to do with it. And, of course, paganism died slowly – as Sir Keith Thomas demonstrated in Religion and the Decline of Magic.

 


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Hello Mr Cornwell,

I am a huge fan of your books; in particular the Uhtred series (my favourite books of all time!!!) and I am delighted to hear there is another on the horizon. From reading the comments on your website I have gathered that Uhtred (or at least his son Uhtred) will be fighting at the Battle of Brunanburh in 937. I have been reading many of the sagas over the past two years (As a result of your books) and seen it noted that Egil Skallagrimson claims to have fought for AEthelstan in the battle; I was wondering, have you given it any thought on whether he will feature as a character in the story? or is it too soon to say (seeing as though you do not plan your future books) it is completely fine if you do not want to give this information away haha.

 

One more question; I have looked frequently for the answer; how common were the sagas to the average person back in Uhtred's time (more so the mythological sagas) would they be considered common knowledge or would it have been rare for everyday people to know the stories. Thank you for all of the wonderful stories you write.

Nicolaas Nicholson

A

It’s probably too soon to say! It’s a few books away yet (I hope)

 

The sagas were probably unknown, but their subject matter? That would have been part of the common stock of knowledge, at least to pagans – not perhaps to Christians. A mother will tell her children stories, but after the conversion to Christianity those stories would quickly lose their pagan content. Some (like the Arthur stories) would be Christianised, others, like the tales of the Norse gods, were probably forgotten

 


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On my last visit to Bamburgh castle I asked if there were any drawings, plans or descriptions of the castle within the time period of your Warrior Chronicles books of Uhtred 870 - 950, I am very interested if the description of the castle within your last book Pagan Lord was based on your research findings or did you have to improvise?

I love Uhtred character, your words have brought him to life for me and taken me on his journey through a very interesting time.

Looking forward to reading more of Uhtred.
Thank you
Chris

A

There’s some research, yes . . . archaeology has revealed some early stone walls, and the area to the east of the present castle was then under water, but much of it, necessarily, was made up!


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Dear Mr Cornwell,

I was re-reading bits of The Pagan Lord the other day, including the angry exchange between Uhtred and his uncle Aelfric. Aelfric accuses Uhtred of never having held any of the land and riches he has won, and declares that even if Uhtred had inherited Bebbanburg he would have simply lost it through his hot-headed arrogance.

That dialogue made me stop and think. Aelfric comes across as a treacherous snake (of course, Uhtred is slightly biased here...) but does he not in fact make a very good point? Would hot-headed Uhtred have been able to hold Bebbanburg for so long in a Danish-controlled Northumbria the way Aelfric did? Did you have that idea in mind when you wrote this passage?

Also, I noticed in Amazon's description for The Empty Throne that "new enemies appear on the northern frontier". Is Uhtred going to be having that trouble with Constantine and his son that he alluded to in The Burning Land?

Thank you kindly,
Vince

A

Uhtred is (or can be) hot-headed, and he confesses to arrogance, so in that sense Aelfric has a point, but I can’t imagine Uhtred risking Bebbanberg’s safety. Regaining it is his overarching ambition, and I think we can rely on him holding it (If) he gets it back.

 

I’ve no idea where Amazon got hold of that notion – the book isn’t even finished yet. Much of the action does move north, but not as far as Scotland (yet)


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

Let me begin by saying, that, like you, I fell in love with CS Forester's work then found my way to you.  I've read all of the Sharpe's books and am a particular fan of the Saxon stories. I finished the Pagan Lord and now must wait anxiously while you conger up the remaining adventures of Uhtred.

I have written my first novel and it is historical fiction.  It's set in England around the time of the 3rd Crusade (well trampled ground I know) and is targeted for young adults. I believe it will specifically appeal to boys, who it seems have become an overlooked audience these days. My research into YA historical fiction finds it heavily weighted towards a female audience with romance as the major theme.  I am writing for the young men who will someday enjoy your books, so I have a male protagonist and I'm heavy on battle scenes and light on romance.

Do you have any thoughts about this market niche? Are there agents who would find a book like this appealing?

Thanks so much for any advice and please keep the books coming!

Sincerely,

Wayne Grant

A

I’m sure there are agents who would find it appealing, but I’m so out of touch I don’t really know who they are. I’ve had the same agent forever (and he’s not taking new clients, we all grow old) so I have no need to look beyond him. One way to find an agent is to look at The Bookseller and read the columns that tell of new contracts and seeing if there’s an agent who is handling books aimed at the same audience . . . I fear that’s the best advice I can offer!

 


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are you planning to release another book in this excellent series.
at the end of the pagan lord you said Uhtred would return.
thanks
Allan Byrnes

 

Will there be another in the Saxon Series? Surely Uhtred cannot be dead. I mean, I realize that he has lived a very long life and is battle-worn, but he just cannot be dead. The end left me puzzled. I had to re-read it because I felt that I'd surely missed something. I remember repeating, "It just can't end like this. Not like THIS." I'm sure many other readers feel the same way. After much contemplation I came to the conclusion that it just can't be the end. It left him in a vacant space, as if the gods had abandoned him or denied him Valhalla, and I just can't see that being the case. I also realize that, as the author, it is your prerogative to end the life story of Uhtred as you see fit, and it is also the job of an author of a series to leave the readers dangling with a cliffhanger so that they buy and read the next book. Of course, I also realize that you may or may not reveal if The Pagan Lord was Uhtred's final moment, going out in battle. Yes, I've been stressing over this
for some months now.
Michele Wilson

 

I have read the whole series with great interest and enjoyment.  Are you writing a follow up book?   I do hope so.  Best wishes.
Shirley Sanderson

A

The next book of Uhtred's story, to be called The Empty Throne, will be published in the UK in October of this year - and in the US in January 2015.


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Dear Mr Cornwell,
I have read all Sharpe books and am just about to get the Pagan Lord. Reading about Uhtred (my favourite) and Derfel,  I´ve always wondered whether you have read and been influenced by Robert Merle´s Fortune de France, since I find some similarities in your styles and plot construction when you write in the 1st person. (The series would definitely deserve a mention in the to-read section).
Wishing you plenty of inspiration.

Juraj

A

I’m ashamed to admit that not only have I not read it, but hadn’t even heard of it! I will try to remedy that, thank you!


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Dear Mr Cornwell,

First of all thank you for the incalculable reading pleasure that your novels have provided over the years. On this fine St Patrick's day I was wondering if you could possibly give some inclination as to what the Norns may have in store for Uhtred's loyal friend and brother in arms Finan the Agile, one of my personal favourite characters from all your works.
Is it possible that we may see a voyage to Ireland to take belated revenge on those who enslaved him all those years ago? I was also wondering what became of his wife and children who were briefly mentioned earlier in the series. Allowing for the passing of time his children must be fully grown by now if they still live.

Best wishes,
Tom

A

I wonder too! In fact I keep planning a voyage back to Ireland, but somehow it never happens (it was supposed to happen in the book I’m writing now, but they get no farther than Wales!) I’ll keep trying, and thank you!


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Dear Mr. Cornwell
Have enjoyed your Uhtred series immensely. Being of Scandinavian descent myself it has been a pure pleasure, and I hope there will be more sequels. Wondering what happened to the horse Whitnere..I hope if there are any more books you will include the Danes overtaking England by Cnut the good or great as they eventually did finally manage it .Thank you Sir, and being Pagan as well, may the Gods bless you.
Your fan,,
Robert Gunn

A

Well I don't know what happened to Whitnere?  I guess he passed away...


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I really enjoyed the Saxon Stories along with the grail quest trilogy,i would like to know if you plan on continuing to write with these characters?
Robert

 

When will the next book of Uhtred's adventures be coming out?
Alan Levith

 

Wikipedia indicates that you will release an 8th book in the Saxon Tales - The Empty Throne - in 2014. Is this true and what part of 2014? I have read fifteen of your books- everything up to the Sharpe's Series- and I have thoroughly enjoyed them all. Thank you so much for each and every one!
Ida Foster

A

That is correct.  The 8th book of Uhtred's story, The Empty Throne, will be published in the UK in October of this year.


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Dear Mr Cornwell,
I felt obliged to at the very least try to contact to you and thank you for the wonderful worlds that you have spun and recreated. The Sharpe series had me constantly hungry for more, The Warlord Chronicles had me on the edge of my seat, and the Grail quest had me from the opening line. However i feel as though the hero of your books would have to be Uhtred of Bebbenburg, whom is a most strong and relatable character. Innumerable times i have submersed myself in your books, and when i reached the end of each series i felt as though a small part of me had died.
My question, put simply, is: will there be any more from Sharpe, Thomas of Hookton, or Derfel Cadarn? I assume that there will be more from Uhtred, as i got the impression in The Pagan Lord that he is not quite finished yet.

If you could please send a response back i would be more than happy, and if not; i'll still be happy that you have read this message
Mitchell Smith

A

No more to Derfel's story and no plans for more of Thomas, but hopefully more Sharpe and I am working on Uhtred's next book now.


Q

Good day to you.
I am writing a book about a Welsh warrior in the times dated similar to that of the warrior chronicles.
It is fictional.
May I assure you that I have not, nor will not be copying from you. There are barriers that we do not cross.
I however would like to ask you if it would be possible for me to have my subject involved in situations and battles that Uhtred was involved in without poaching?

You have influenced me immensely and I have no doubt I could never emulate your fine work so please keep us inpatient for your new releases.

All the best

C Barnett

A

Oh sure, why not? And if the battles were real (like Mount Badon) then I assure you I have no rights at all! I hope it goes well.

 


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Dear Bernard.

I am re-reading this whole series. It's wonderful. I can't help thinking that the story of Uhtred would be fantastic if it was made into a film or tv series as Sharpe was. Is there any possibility that this might happen in the future?
Pauline Walker
I just heard a rumor that the makers/producers (or someone associated with) Downton Abbey stated that they were making a series based on The Saxon Series.  Is this true?  I truly hope so, that would be an awesome vision for TV!  Love the books, and the stories and hope to see them on the little screen.
Can't wait for the next book to come out!
Thank you.
Sharon Griffiths

A

I hope so too!


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You will not be aware of it, but you have been a great help to me as I am writing my own book, set in 614AD. As you suggest in your writing advice, I have been studying some of the Uhtred books. I am working with a mentor and she is trying to lift me to another level. So in my rewrites I am looking for flaws and weaknesses.
One such problem was a difficulty with the battle of Chester in 616AD. Reading The Pagan Lord, I have discovered that I have got my characters crossing the river Dee when they didn't need to. Your account of the taking of the fort has been so helpful as well as the account of Bebbanburgh, which if ever I get to write it, will feature in a later book.
I am assuming that the Celtic Britons  fought with slings, spears, daggers and bow and arrows, only the trained military using swords. Would I be right? There is so little reliable information available.
Anyhow, reading your books is of an enormous help to me.
Maureen Chapman

A

Probably, because a sword was an extremely expensive piece of kit! But add in axes, hay-knives and clubs? A hay-knife would make a very effective short sword. A sharpened hoe could spoil your day too!

 


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Dear Bernard,

Thank you so much for the wonderful Uhtred saga. It helped/helps me cope with some unpleasant things in my life. I hope there will be many more books featuring him. Have you thought about a spin-off series, focusing on Uhtred's son? It would be great if Uhtred's legacy continues, possibly written by another author. Then, in a way, it would become your legacy as well.

All the best,

René
The Netherlands

A

No plans for it.


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Mr Cornwell,

I have just finished reading the pagan lord and I also read that you planned maybe 3 more books in the Saxon series. I was wondering whether Uhtred will continue to fight in the shield wall or whether he will be too old and have too many injuries to continue to be a warrior (or will I have to just wait until October to find out) will he now just be watching his son from the side line cheering him on? Sorry I'm not sure if I can wait until October to find out.

Richard Parkhouse

A

You will find out more in October!


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Hello, Mr. Cornwell.

I am a fan of all your novels and the Uhtred novels in particular. I was wondering if you are familiar with a television series on the History Channel called "Vikings"? The reason I ask is that the main character in the TV series is Ragnar Lodbrok, who had several heroic sons, most interestingly Ivar the Boneless, Halfdan and Ubba, who are, of course, characters in some of your novels. Interesting to watch the series and keep your novels in mind when enjoying all the characters. Thanks for so many wonderful books: continued success to you.

John.

A

No,  I have not seen it.


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Mr. Cornwell,

I enjoyed your latest compelling book in the Saxon Series.  But, please, what does the final sentence in the Pagan Lord mean?!

Thanks, Pam

 

Please, please let Uhtred live.  I just finished   "the pagan Lord"
I m not ready for that!
Sharon Sharp

 

Rather than a message I actually have a question, regarding the future of Uhtred of Bebbanburg.
Simply, will he back for another stirring saga?

Guil Parker

 

Are there any more books to come please.
Sheila Weston

A

Uhtred will be back!


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I would just like to write a short message to say thank you for making reading enjoyable for me again; I am 19 years old and have never been a huge lover of reading until I got into your Warrior Chronicles series.
I am currently on book 7th The Pagan Lord and the High Gate has just closed on Uhtred at Bebbanburg!
I'm sure the ending of your latest installment will provide the answer but will there be any further books in The Warrior Chronicles?
Many thanks for many hours of enjoyable reading and if you could recommend any more books with a similar style to The Warrior Chronicles it would be greatly appreciated (feel free to recommend your own!).

Josh Bold

 

your New Book is five star when I started to read was not able to put it down .Will
Uhtred ride to victory? Thank you

DOUG

First let me say how much your books of Uhtred have helped me through a rough time! I had a double mastectomy and problems associated but had found your series on Uhtred and used them to put my mind into another realm! Now I have searched to find the series finale-is there one? I think I have read them all going from library to library-will Uhtred finally get Bebbanburg? What is the final book? Thank you again
Bonnie

A

I am working on the next book of Uhtred's story now.  It will be called The Empty Throne and hopefully will be ready for publication in the UK in October.


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I thought that I had read that you were working on a non-fiction work about the Battle of Waterloo, and that the book was expected to follow The Pagan Lord.  Now I note that you are working towards the release the next Saxon Story in the fall of this  year.   What ever happened to the book about Waterloo?  Not that I am complaining -- I am looking forward to seeing how Uhtred's near death experience and his age (he must be in his mid 50's, a good age for the time) affects his approach to his goals.  I was interest in reading your book about Waterloo to see how a storyteller deal with history as the focus of, rather than the backdrop for, his story.
John Moroun

A

I will publish two books this year.  My first non-fiction book, The Battle of Waterloo, will be published (in the UK) in May.  The 8th book of Uhtred's story, The Empty Throne, will be published in October.


Q

I thought that I had read that you were working on a non-fiction work about the Battle of Waterloo, and that the book was expected to follow The Pagan Lord.  Now I note that you are working towards the release the next Saxon Story in the fall of this  year.   What ever happened to the book about Waterloo?  Not that I am complaining -- I am looking forward to seeing how Uhtred's near death experience and his age (he must be in his mid 50's, a good age for the time) affects his approach to his goals.  I was interest in reading your book about Waterloo to see how a storyteller deal with history as the focus of, rather than the backdrop for, his story.
John Moroun

A

I will be publishing two books this year.  The Battle of Waterloo will be published (in the UK) in May and the 8th book of the Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Tales, The Empty Throne, will be published in October.


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Hi Mr. Cornwell.

I miss Sharpe!  It's been 7 years since we last heard of him, and surely that's enough?  I notice in your website that questions and comments about Uhtred outnumber questions and comments about Sharpe by at least 10 to 1.  I fear that he is becoming one of your forgotten "back of the shelf" series that you hope to get back to "some day" (like Starbuck).  I know you're eager to begin your new Elizabethan series, but couldn't you first add at least another chapter to Sharpe's story, preferably Albuera?  I just want to see you finish what you've started while you've still got time left to do it (although I hope you live past 100)!  But just in case, please write another Sharpe in 2015.

Alan Kempner

 

Hi Mr Cornwell
I was wondering if there are going to be more tv series of sharpe like trafalgar and others.
Mark Thomas

 

If you have beed asked this question recently, please forgive me.
Are you planning additional Sharpes books after Sharpes Devil?  If so, could you name its title and when it might be available?
Thanks you for taking time to answer me and for the Sharpes series in general.
Michael Ward

 

A

Sharpe is not forgotten!  But I don't think there will be a Sharpe book in 2015.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,
I just bought The Pagan Lord and re-read the previous 2 books in the series.
Twice now in reading I have been impressed with the character of Father Heahberht, who Uhtred met just prior to the battles at and around Beamfleot.  It seemed even Uhtred appreciated his honesty and courage.
Do you have any plans to re-introduce the character?  If not, please do- he deserves to be a Bishop, short robe and all.  A suitable foil to Bishop Erkenwald or Father Coenwulf, perhaps?
Lastly, did you name him after the 9th Century bishop of Worcester, or the 8th Century King of Kent?

Thank you for writing such engaging books.
Andrew Rienstra

A

I can’t remember now where I found the name . . . I cpy down names as I find them and he was on the list, but how he got there I have no idea. So you want him promoted? I’ll do my best!

 


Q

Hi there,
I wanted to Thank you, for giving me back reading... yes I know that sounds odd lol but, till the sharpe tv show came out, I was a very hit and miss reader, when that show came up and I later saw a book of it, it got me into your writings.... the Arthur series was great, but... You really hit the mark with me when it came to your saxon series. I am a Wulfrunian (a native of Wolverhampton) and have always had a fascination with my local history, so when I got reading that series and all about mercia, I was hooked, I have been researching all my area's history from Alfred downwards, obviously with a big focus on the Aethelflaed areas,
So when Pagan Lord came out I was wondering, will he mention the battle?? and I was so glad when you did include it!! and you did a really good job on it, especially, where you described wonderfully, the darkness about its actual whereabouts!! (I actually have a theory about that lol)

So I wanted, as a Wulfrunian, to say thank you... for including my area (the battle is/was in the area where I sit) One question tho... in your research... did you manage to find out anything more about this King Eowils? apart from him being a joint king of Northumberland with Halfdan? I have been trying and coming up with blanks, apart from a few suggestions that he was a beserker

anyway, I'll stop here, but as today is also your birthday (I saw it on facebook, I'm wulfrun_andy there ) Have a wonderful birthday!! and please, continue with Uhtred!! and when he dies, perhaps into Mercia!!

All the best,

Andy

A

I did find some interesting facts, but sadly the notebook is a thousand miles away so it’ll have to stay a mystery for the moment, sorry.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,
I adore historical fiction, especially yours! I like to write myself, and I have written a short story set during the reign of Alfred the Great in which I have included Uhtred as a character, one of my protagonist's good mates. I hope you don't mind! I have also done the same with Sharpe, just as Simon Scarrow presumably did in his novel The Fields of Death, where he briefly mentioned a tall, rifle-carrying Greenjacket Major named Richard. With that in mind, I was wondering: if you ever wrote a cameo for another author's creation, which would it be?
Also, after introducing my father and a number of friends to Azincourt I have been pestered with speculation about a potential film adaptation of it? I absolutely loved Sean Bean's Sharpe and I've been praying for another of your stories to be brought to life on screen, I was hoping there might be a kernel of truth to the rumours?
Thor guide you,
Gustaf Haynes

A

Oh, probably Hornblower!  But whether I’ll do it? Don’t know.

There's the occasional talk of film, but I honestly don't pay too much attention to it.  Maybe it'll happen, but I won't hold my breath!


Q

I have just concluded The Pagan Lord. When is the next one due out, please, and do you have a name for it, so that I can pre-order on Amazon?
Many thanks in advance.
John Searancke

 

Very much enjoy your books...please due you have a month when the next Saxon Story will be available in England?
Thanks
Tony

 

 

Loving the Saxon Tales series....The Pagan Lord.. was "edge of seat" stuff for certain!
When's the eagerly awaited next installment due?....and are the rumours true that Uhtred The Younger slips through a portal in the space-time continuum and plays upfront for Newcastle United?
Phil W

 

 

I just finished reading the Pagen Lord, and loved it. Am I going to have to wait two more years to read the next installment.  I truly enjoy your writing.  I just get frustrated waiting for the next book from you and many other authors I follow..
Thank you for this series..
Karry Dohlen

A

We do have a title - The Empty Throne.  With any luck it will be published in the UK on 23 October 2014.


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How do you pronounce Uhtred?
Debbie

A

Uhtred? to rhyme with hoot, but with a slight guttural inflection - oot-red.


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Mr Cornwell;

I read the vast majority of your books. I started reading them with the first Sharpe book released in the USA. back in 1981 I believe.
I have thoroughly enjoyed them all . I must say that as much as Richard Sharpe is a great character I think Uhtred of Bebbanburg is your best.
I found myself  literally saying out loud " don't die, don't die " at the end of The Pagan Lord.
You sent Uhtred over the precipice then pulled him back! Masterful writing!!!
I hope you meant Uhtred the elder would see the downfall of the Saxons, not his son..don't do that to us!!!
But Athelflaed only has about 7 yrs left historically and Uhtred will be almost 60 when she dies.
How many more books do you envision?? Hopefully 3 more.
Respectfully
Edward Caccavale

A

I'm still not sure how many more...maybe 3....maybe more than 3???


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Mr. Cornwell,
Do you do your own research for the Saxon series and if you do what resources  would you suggest to someone who would like to learn more about this period of time in English history?  I LOVE the Saxon series.  Please keep Uhtred around for as long as possible!!!  And write faster!!!!
Your avid reader,
Lucy Townley

A

I do.  For a listing of non-fiction works I used in researching this series click on this link (you will also find a 'Suggestions for Further Reading; link on every bookpage of this website): http://www.bernardcornwell.net/readingclub/?series=the-saxon-stories


Q

I thoroughly enjoyed the Starbuck chronicles but it seems to have been left unfinished! In the historical note to the last book you say that "Starbuck will march again" Will there be more Starbuck? Please?
David Lines

 

Mr. Cornwell,
I've just started in on THE PAGAN LORD, and it's top notch, sir. I think the Saxon stories have now edged out your other works as my favorite. So, two questions then: I know you've been asked this ten thousand times before, but will we EVER see any more of Nathaniel Starbuck? How about a tale set in Roman Britain? Is there any hope for that?
Thanks for all of the fabulous stories!
Chris Grega

 

Dear Mr Cornwell
I have just finished The Bloody Ground and must congratulate you on a quite superb series. Having read almost all of your books, including the magnificent Sharpe and the even better Warrior Chronicles, I did not expect an even better read. I was very wrong. Nate Starbuck rivals Uhtred as the ultimate hero, and I could not help but want the Confederacy to win every confrontation, even if in reality I disagreed strongly with their attitude towards slavery. I wanted to ask you, if there is any chance you will write more books based around Nate and the civil war or did you finish at Antietam, for a particular reason? Either way I will continue to read your novels until there are no more. Many thanks.
Simon Smith

A

I do hope to return to Starbuck one day...no plans for the Romans!


Q

Greetings Mr Cornwell,

I am a huge fan of your books. I was re-reading your Uhtred novels and seen mention of warhammers used in battle, I was just wondering how common this was, especially seeing how expensive swords were back then? And because Thor was famous for fighting with a hammer. Another thing I wondered is who is your favourite English monarch? Kind Regards,
Nicci

A

I really don’t know how common they were; certainly they were in use in the middle ages, when they were remarkably effective against plate armour. I suspect they were less common in Anglo-Saxon times, but not unknown?

 

Elizabeth I, by a long long way!


Q

Hi Bernard

Just finished reading the Pagan Lord and wanted to complement you on another excellent addition to the story of King Alfred and his descendants.

I watched the final episode of the BBC series King Alfred and the Anglo Saxons last night and noticed a reference to the attendance of a Lord Uhtred of Bebbanburg at a meeting with King Athelstan.

Does this mean that Uhtred (or one of his ancestors) will eventual retake Bebbanburg?

Looking forward to reading the next installment in Uhtred's story

Best wishes

Steven

A

Keep reading...


Q

On page 125, line 15 of the new Harper hard-cover edition. Edward is nervous. " of " Danish  unrest. I've only noted American English speakers using " of " for " with" or "about" in the last year or two, in this context of  fear or concern. Always awaiting new Uhtred novel!
Michael Ashman

A

Really? I haven’t noticed that. ‘Fear of the Lord’? King James Bible?


Q

I don't want to distract you from completing Uhtred's story (my favorite among your works), but would like to suggest you consider doing a book on the French & Indian War.  The Battle of the Plains of Abraham seems a perfect canvas for your story-telling skills...
Edith

A

Thank you.  I think about the French and Indian War from time to time, but it's not a priority and certainly won't be done soon.


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Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I have followed Lord Uhtred's story with great interest, and have happily encouraged my neighbour to join the saga.  He is now also hooked!

You made the point that too many of us feel that English history started with 1066. I certainly fell for that line, a gift of rather good schooling in South London in the 1950s. I knew about Alfred and others, but it all seemed like 'pre-history'.  Thank you for knocking that m