Your Questions

Q

Dear Mr.Cornwell, Firstly I'd like to say I am absolutely in love with your work, and I've read your Winter King series so much that the covers are now falling off the books. At the moment I am a twelfth grade student doing a ISP on Historical Fiction and I've chosen your Winter King series to be my example. I'd really like to know your opinion on how the fictionalization of history helps the readers understand the realities i.e. emotions, of the time period. I'm not asking you as a source for my paper, as it is mostly written at this point, but out of curiosity because you happen to be my favourite author. Thank you very much for your time. Stacey McDonald

A

Perhaps by making it more real? I'm not saying that 'real' (i.e. non-fictional) history is not real, but historians cannot go beyond the evidence. They can suggest things, but they always have to stick to hard, cold facts, and as much of history lacks hard, cold facts there are gaps. Novelists can fill those gaps and, perhaps, by making the past very vivid and immediate help folk understand what it was like to live back then. But it's no replacement for the real thing. An historical novelist is not, or should not be, a history teacher - he or she should be a storyteller. But if the books bring history alive then that ain't a bad thing.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell I'm a huge fan of your books. My favourite books were the Warlord chronicles. I have one questions I would like to get answered 1)it seems in the book your Britain is a place where "day by day it (treasure hoard) shrinks and we don't know how to stop it or make more". But is there a possibly that Arthur (or somone like him) could've called for the Romans for help? thus with the Roman help created a peaceful and orderly land that your Arthur so longed for?- justin

A

The Romans did not leave Britain out of kindness - this was not a handing over of power to the colonised - they left because they had to, because Rome itself was under siege from barbarians, so they were in no position to help even if they'd wanted to, and if they had then you can be sure that they would not have let the British kings go on ruling - it would have been back to imperialism. So no help there!


Q

Any chance that there will be a sequel to Gallows Thief? If not, is there any other new book in the works (apart from the Sharpe series)? Thanks and regards: JW

hello! Mr. Cornwell, I have been a huge fanand avid reader of your books since I was only 11. I was wondering what you plan to write on after the next Sharpe comes out. More Starbucks? More Rider Sandman? More anything because your books are all magnificent. Thank you for your time, Richard Mock

A

Something new. All to be revealed in good time (meaning when I'm confident I can make it work)


Q

i was just curious what your favorite personal book you have written is. also what you best selling book is. Thanks Shawn

A

My favourite books are the three Arthur stories - The Winter King, The Enemy of God and Excalibur. The best-selling? I've never asked and don't know - that may seem odd, but I tend to block out sales reports - I don't think they're good for the soul.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, My compliments on your very entertaining style of writing. Of all your stories, my favourite series is Sharpe -- each book of which I have read at least 3 times (in 6 months). I have a query about your character of Teresa Moreno. She is based on a true-life character of the time -- please tell me who? And is there any further information about the real partisan? Thanks, and keep up the new Sharpe stories. Jane Russell

A

I don't think she is! I certainly don't remember basing her on any real person. There were women partisans, of course, but none who is the origin of Teresa. Sorry!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I am a 16 year old who has been enthralled by your books for 3 years and struggle immensely to put one down when I am in the middle of one. I just finished reading Vagabond (having finished all of the currently available Sharpe books) and cannot wait to get my hands on Heretic. My first question is a Sharpe one: was there ever a book about the film that took place between Sharpe's Revenge and Sharpe's Waterloo called Sharpe's Justice (where he finds his brother back in England)? Was that your idea? And my second question is a Grail Quest one: How long was Father Ralph in Hookton from when he was tortured to when Guy Vexille came and could the villagers of Hookton not realize that Ralph was indeed from Astarac based on his accent? Jamie Neugebauer

A

If I remember rightly he was there about eight years? I'd have to reread the first book to check, but it's about that. They wouldn't tell anything from his accent! They couldn't understand people from the next county, let alone realise a French accent! Besides - Father Ralph was essentially English. There is no 'Sharpe's Justice' book - it was a screenplay only and I was not involved in writing it.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, Just finished Heretic.....what can I say that hasn't already been said, a great read. I was interested in your thoughts about Dorset, my GG G/father was born in Beaminster Dorset in 1828. He was with the 76th regt. for 22yrs. culminating in Colour Sgt. I visited a book site today that said your real name is Bernard Wiggins, is that true? I hope you don't mind a personal question. Rgds Robert Marsh

A

I was born Bernard Cornwell - and that's the name on my first birth certificate, but then I was adopted into the Wiggins family, so received a substitute birth certificate, and last year I changed my name back to the original (because I prefer it). Complicated? Ah well. I wish it were a Dorset name, but I don't think it is.


Q

I'm confused about "Mission" & "Justice." I'm an historical novel lover and recently discovered your fantastic writings. Right now I'm reading all of the Sharp's books and then watching the DVD versions. However, I can't find the book versions of "Mission" and "Justice." Were they screenplays only? Thanks Joe

A

Yes, 'Mission' and 'Justice' were screenplays only - no books.


Q

to the Honerable Mr. Cornwell. You may remember me inquiring upon Hagmans' death in "Sharpe's Waterloo". I have written to you again to ask you if the first three books "Sharpe's Tiger", "Sharpe's Triumph", and "Sharpe's Fortress" have been considerd for television? I would love to see those three within the Sharpe TV series. Also, while in my local bookshop, I noticed that you have written "The ultimate Sharpe Companion". I also read in "Sharpe's Honour" that you did not get any complaints about Sergeant Hakeswill's death, to be honest, I liked him as Pete Postelthwate played him spectacualy, I also would like to know if you have written anything on the Crimean War? as that would be another Cornwell Masterpiece, in any case, please keep writing yor novels, you are the reason I enjoy literature and you are also the reason I have already written four books of my own Yours very respectfully, Martin Knox

A

I have not written on the Crimean War - no plans for it at the moment. And no plans for any more Sharpe films right now either. I did not write The Ultimate Sharpe Companion, the author of the Sharpe Companion books is Mark Adkin - and they are truly wonderful books.


Q

Hello Mr Cornwall, I started reading Enemy of God when I was 14, and now 6 years later, I have read all three of the Warlord Chronicles at least 12 - 13 times each, no joke. I love them, as well as the Grail Quest and Stonehenge. My room mates always ask me if I will ever tire of reading about Arthur, and I don't think that I ever will. I read Uther by Jack Whyte, and altough I enjoyed it greatly, it simply wasn't like the Warlord Chronicles. I want to know if you ever thought of writing about Derfel after Arthur left? He lived for many years after, and I would like to read about his life. Thank you for creating something that I look forward to everytime I open the cover, no matter how many times I have read it. Veronica

A

Have I thought of it? Yes, but will I do it? Not likely - I feel the story has been told. I'm glad to know how much you enjoy the books. Thanks for writing.