Your Questions

Q

Good evening Mr. Cornwell,

I'm a french reader, who almost learned english by reading your books, in fact I couldn't wait till the translation would be available in my mother tongue so I had to go for them in their original language.

No need to say I'm a great fan; I've already read the nine books of Uthred, the graal quest and the Arthurian trilogy (twice).

I know you've probably heard this question too many times, but are you considering to write a book, or a series of books, about the english most famous archers, robin hood?

I think such a story would be a great gift to all of your fans!!

Bye,

Pierre

A

I have considered Robin Hood....who knows?  Maybe....


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell,

I am new 2 your books me Dad put me on to you. But your novels r the best things iv ever read!!! I love Uthred and was wondering if when his saga is complete there's one in a similar style with Harold Godwinson in the role over Alfred about the lead up and aftermath og the 1066 invasion. You are the ONLY Man who could do that fact based fiction story and I would love to read your story of that period. I understand your legal bit but if I could id pay you to write it 4real! !!!. Anyways ur the best author on earth far as I'm concerned. Thank you for so many hours with with Uhtred ,Thomas of Hooton, Derfel Nick Hook and of course Sharpe. Keep on writing and again Thank You u should b Knighted or something.

Danny Bruce

A

Thank you!  Not sure I'll get to Godwinson....


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell,

I'm fascinated reading your books but I have a basic doubt. In "Northumbria, the last kingdom" appears the characters names Ragnar, Ubba and Ivar ... As far as I know Ubba and Ivar were sons of Ragnar and in your book they are presented like contemporary of him and not like sons ... Could you please explain that to me?

Thanks in advance for your answer ...

Kind regards

Guillermo

 

A

The names are fairly common . . there were lots of Ivars, Ubbas and Ragnars – Tom, Dick and Harry.

 


Q

Hi

First a massive plea, please let's have some more Thomas Hookton books. I have read your comments and it sounds as if you are not a fan anymore of this character, but I know lots of people who are.

Second I am confused the Grail series is almost a chronology, and ends with Thomas disposing of the Grail. The next mention of Thomas,  not in the Grail series I grant you sees Thomas as a Sir and we are told he was knighted, but there is a tantalising question of to what the circumstances were that led to the unusual elevation. Come on you can't leave all his fans in suspense like this.

David Pyke

A

Well, who knows? Maybe I’ll write it one day . . . .  till then I’m in the dark, like you (though Thomas wouldn’t be the first archer to receive a knighthood).

 


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell,

While I am just starting 1356, I had a few questions regarding one of my favorite characters of all time, Thomas of Hookton. He is very affable and intelligent, and I wanted to know how he learned Latin and got into Oxford. Did one have to be legitimately born to become a priest? If so, was he an exception? I really love the series, and I was also wondering if you've ever gotten any offers for an adaptation of the novels. Thomas of Hookton would make an amazing movie!

Regards,

Bobby

A

That’s a good question, thank you – and in truth I don’t know whether legitimacy was a requirement for ordination. But I doubt anyone was too assiduous about checking the paperwork in the 13th and 14th Centuries, so entrance to Oxford would have depended far more heavily on a patron as against parentage.

There may have been some talk about films...but truthfully I'm afraid I haven't paid much attention to it.  I don't think there's anything happening now.


Q

Hey Bernard,

Avid Last kingdom fan over her from Montreal, The Draken Harald Hargafre just landed over here from Norway as it continues to go to the great lakes. Are you interested in the project at all or considering checking it out in the US??

http://www.drakenexpeditionamerica.com/

Besides the new Last kingdom book, Can u tell us if there's anything new coming out? new series you're working on or solo books? .

Thanks,

Never was a reader until i stumbled across your stuff.

David Derasp,

A

I’ve been following it – thank you!

I'm not writing now - too busy with summer theatre!


Q

Just FYI: the July/August 2016 issue of Archaeology Magazine had an article on the ongoing excavations at Bamburgh, aka Bebbanburgh, aka Subject title above. I'm sure you've been there, so you probably know more about it than the article. It did mention a Viking sacking in 993, will that be part of the Uhtred saga?

Peter Hansen

A

Uhtred won’t live that long, sorry!


Q

Hello Mr Cornwell

I noticed that the last pirate(s) related question you got asked was from last year... I think it's time for another one.

Pirates? How 'bout it Capt'n?

Thanks

Marco

Ps. Looking forward to The Flame Bearer.

 

A

One day, perhaps, maybe, it’s a definite uncertainty!


Q

Hi Bernard,

I'm currently reading The Pale Horseman and it looks like I have a lot of reading ahead of me! I have two questions; the first is how may Angles, Saxons, Danes and Jutes do you think invaded Britain? Obviously you can't put an accurate number on it but based on your research do you think there was a massive population replacement/wiping out of native Britons? I got into population genetics a while back and it looks like at least there was a male dominated elite invasion (and there's a chance there were small numbers of Saxons brought as mercenaries by the Romans).

Secondly, how big were these battles between the Saxons and Danes? In between the main battles it seems like there were a lot of small skirmishes and raids that must have cleared entire villages.

Thanks

Rossa, Donegal

A

The best I could do would be a guess, and that would be fairly pointless! I have no idea. Enough to take over the country, certainly . . . . there must be an expert somewhere who’d venture an estimate?

 

On the whole these battles were fairly small compared to, say, the wars of the 15th and 16th Centuries – let alone more recent times. The problem is one of logistics; how to feed an army of any great size. There are no reliable figures (chroniclers tend to exaggerate wildly), but an army of five to six thousand men would be manageable. Anything over that becomes far more difficult to supply. But I suspect most armies were much smaller . . . some modern estimates say Guthrum’s ‘Great Army’ was only about 1000 men!


Q

Could you tell me if you are gonna do something like Azincourt but from a man at arms perspective?

I am currently going though you books from the medieval period, and i seriously cannot get enough of them

Thanks a lot,

Josh

A

I don’t know. It’s not in the pipeline now, but if I live long enough?