Bulletin Board

Q

Dear Mr Cornwell- I am looking forward to reading your latest SHARPE book, having read all the other books in this series and in the meantime I am reading through the book by Mark Adkin-the Sharpe Companion the Early Years and am finding it to be invaluable in adding to the pleasure of reading all your SHARPE stories. I also very much enjoyed the two short stories you wrote ie: Sharpe's Skirmish & Sharpe's Christmas, and am looking forward to many more SHARPE Adventures-Best Wishes D.H.


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It's time for Starbuck to march again. Marjorie Taber


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Dear Mr Cornwell. I wondered if you had ever been approached about a Sharpe computer game and what you think of the idea. I think it would be really fun. I imagine something where you control the character of Richard Sharpe throughout various scenarios, one for each of the book, having to resolve issues and fight bad guys in a first person situation. Perhaps there could be skills to be enhanced throughout gameplay such as when a level is completed. The battle scenes where Sharpe is in the thick of things could be like a usual beat em up type game but with swords. But where he has to command a group of men such as in Enemy where he is doing pretty much a general's job it could be like a war strategy game. There could perhaps be a campaign option to play Wellington as general thorughout his major battles. My thoughts on Scenario 1 - Sharpe's Tiger: Beat em up type battle scene with the Tippoo Sultan's "tigers". Brief video cutscene - Sharpe and Hakeswill fight, flogging, the Seringapatam mission explained. Sharpe and Lawford then having to avoid getting killed but captured in another cutscene and taken to the Tippoo. Various adventures for Sharpe until he is discovered and locked up again. Then he has to figure out how to escape the tigers and jetties, aid the British in their attack and kill the Tippoo. Hope you don't mind me rambling on. It would be so great if there was a Sharpe game! Marie

A

There are no plans for a Sharpe computer game at the moment - but it does sound fun! Thanks for your message.


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Dear Bernard, I started reading 'The Winter King' a few days ago after having put it off for a long time. I didn't really fancy another 'Arthur and Merlin' tale. But the comments on this site persuaded me to give it a go. Can I just say how pleased I am that I did. Absolutely superb, brilliant and all the other adjectives you can think of. I particularly love the way you have portrayed Lancelot. Just as how I would have imagined (if I had an imagination as wonderfull as yours that is). I always thought there was something dodgy about him. Thank you again. Ed


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Bernard, I am both very pleased and a little disappointed to see another Sharpe novel (Sharpe's Escape), what would we do without him? However I do worry that filling in all the gaps in the Napoleonic Wars with Sharpe begins to stretch the belief in this wonderful character. Could it be time to give him a leave of abscence and develop some existing or new characters. Rider Sandman in the Gallows Thief for example is ripe for a couple more tales. Although I must say the end of the novel could have done with at least another chapter to tie things up. I do not want to appear too critical as I am a huge fan of your writing and especially Sharpe. Please keep up the great work. regards, Mark


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Re Sharpe's Fortress, your description of Sharpe's discomfort as an officer is dead on accurate. After 5 years as an enlisted soldier I received a direct appointment to first lieutenant in the JAG corps. Although I stayed in the National Guard for over 30 years and retired as a colonel, I always felt like an impostor, just like Sharpe in your book. I enjoy your work. Jim McBride


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I've read almost all your books, most of them in original language (here in Italy the Sharpe's still an ensign in India) and of course I'm one of those that are wondering where the hell Nathaniel has gone... Anyway my purpose is not to annoy you with already-asked questions. I just wanted to compliment you for your history knowledge (I'm also a little bit envious of it) and for your narration style. I'm engaged in "Vagabond" now and I find it great, as usual. I'm only waiting for a series in WWII. England fought in all theatres of operations and I think you should have plenty of material not for 20 but for 200 books! Tally ho, Bernard! Regards Eros Pittacolo

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Sorry, but I don't plan any WWII books - or anything in the 20th century. I prefer to stick with older history.


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Surely you haven't finished the Starbuck series. These were the best of a great collection. Bert Connell


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Dear Mr. Cornwell: So many times I've read or seen a good story and never got to thank the author. I love a good action story but the choice of Sean Bean for the title role of Sharpe was great. I hope he will do more. Thank you and keep em coming. I will look forward to the next installment on PBS or History channel. Yours truly Barbara


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I have throughly enjoyed all of your novels, especially the Arthur Books. I'm curious, as to your personal religious beliefs and how they have influenced your writings, if at all. Robert Auskalnis

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They do, indeed they do, but I'm not going to say how! On the one hand you have the anti-Christian bias of much of the Arthur books (and, indeed, of the new book set in Alfred's Wessex), but I also enjoyed describing the Christian conversion of Swynyard in the American Civil War books. I think I'm playing both sides of the table, but I will confess to a fascination with religion.


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