Your Questions

Q

Dear sir,

This is the best series I have read in years. Could you please tell me if there are more of adventures to come for Uthred?  I am hopeful.

Thank you

Cathy Brandt.

 

Mr. Cornwell,

First off, let me thank you for the amazing work you have done.  The Last Kingdom series is by far the best I've ever read (show is great as well).....even better than Stirling's Emberverse series!!  I've just started reading the Grail Quest series, and I know it won't disappoint.  I've one question, which I'm sure you have been asked countless times......will there be an eleventh Last Kingdom book??

Nick Cemprola

 

Dear Mr Cornwell.

I have been an avid reader of your books for as long as l can remember. But your warlord series has been the best of them all.

Utred is a fantastic character and the tv series brilliant.

My question is, and l apologise if this had been asked and l missed your response, when will the next book be published and will it be the last one? I can't wait to see if he ever gets his castle back.

Thank you for your time.

Lorraine Pearson

A

I am currently writing the 11th book of The Last Kingdom series.  It will be available - both in the UK and the US - in September of this year.


Q

I just received the beautifully produced first set of the Horatio Hornblower novels from the Folio Society, and was pleased to find that you had written introductions to each of the books.  Are there any plans for the Folio Society to put out any of your books as well (particularly the Sharpe series)?

Ryan

A

Not that I know of!


Q

Dear Sir,

I have just finished reading "Sharpe's Sword," which is my favorite of the series, so far at least.  You created a fascinating level of intrigue in this work.  My question pertains to the Klingenthal sword, specifically, the value of such a weapon.  I have done some cursory research and have found a Napoleonic Era Cuirassiers Sword  on sale on line for about 3000 pounds.  According to Major Hogan, the price of a majority at the time was 2600 pounds.  Of course, in Sharpe's time 3000 pounds would be worth far less, through inflation, than the price of a majority, but it would have had some value, enough to contribute significantly toward the purchase of a majority, perhaps.  Have you any notion of its value in 1812?

Best Wishes.

Keith Biesiada

A

This is from memory, because my research is a thousand miles away, but a really good sword, I think, cost around 50 pounds. If it was decorated with precious metals then it might go up to 100 pounds, or even more.


Q

This is going to sound really crazy but we have a family story that is really similar to a charcter in one of your books. Sharpes Enemy.  My question is how much of this character was made up?

Our family history as told by grandfather- Pedro Ducos who arrived in Puerto Rico in the 1800 was from Irun Spain which is a border town between France and Spain. He said he was spanish but his last name is clearly french and his first name Pedro translates to Pierre - then the story like this..he supposedly was really from France betrayed Bonaparte and escaped to the island of San Juan Bautista modern day Puerto Rico. He was able to buy many acres of land which dwindled down in 200 years to 40 acres. My grandfathers pride to this whole story is that this man Pedro Ducos was able to escape and "GOT AWAY" with whatever life journey he was on.

 

Im searching ancestry looking for any info on my 3x great grandfather Pedro Ducos.  So my question again is how much of this charcter in your book is made up?

 

Thank you

Vanessa Ducos

A

I fear he’s totally made up!! No relation – what a pity!


Q

Hello Mr. Cornwell.

Now that we know season 3 of TLK is really happening, and you'll be making a cameo appearance, can you give us a hint as to in which episode you will be appearing? With makeup artists being as good as they are, I surely wouldn't want to miss your appearance as using eyeglasses to help identify you will obviously not be of much assistance!

If you've already been filmed, I imagine the experience was quite a hoot for you and I'm hoping Uhtred's (desired) insult was a doozy! If so, were you allowed a pithy retort?

Jason Marcus

A

I appear (unless I end on the cutting room floor) in episode 7. It was, indeed, a hoot. I won’t say what Uhtred does to me on camera, but off camera we had a terrific time.

 


Q

Both Gloucester and Tamworth are celebrating 1100 years of Aethelflaed and are holding themed events. Some years ago, you spoke at Gloucester's Guildhall and Cheltenham's Everyman Theatre - do you have any plans to visit the Mercian region again?

Elaine Cadman-Cramp

A

I shall be visiting later this year, but sadly can’t be in Tamworth for the unveiling of the statue.


Q

Mr. Cornwell,

After having read the Warlord and Saxon series, I'm interested in your thoughts of the relative efficiency of the Roman legionary infantry (at the height of their prowess) compared to the British / Saxon / Danish infantry.  I have always been interested in the Roman period, and based on what I've read, it seems like the Roman heavy infantry were the pinnacle of close combat warfare.  With large shields, short stabbing swords, heavy armor, organization, and discipline, they would set the standard for all that came after.  Granted, that the Romans lost plenty of battles, but I'm sure they won abundantly more, so that it was something of a shock when they lost.

Compared to Uhtred, leading a couple thousand men into battle, and with only a few hundred of those well armed, armored, and trained, the commander of a couple of Roman cohorts would be at an almost insurmountable advantage. Mated with the quality of troops, to have a logistical system in place so they are capable of operating year round far from home, it must seem like a race of giants to Alfred's Wessex.

I know you don't want any ideas for books, but I personally would love to read a few books of your that covered this topic.

Love your books.  Thanks.

Andrew Mileur

A

I won’t disagree with you – but again, it’s one of those hypothetical situations – we just don’t know!

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

Have you by any chance during your research found out the first use of Oughtred as a surname, how far back does it go?

Thank you for any help given,

David Oughtred

 

A

It was certainly in use during the 14th Century, and probably before. It’s related, of course, to Uhtred, so in that form it goes back to the 8th or 9th Century.

 


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell

I have a question about Rollo, one of the leading men of Ragnar Ragnarsson. In the third book he is one of Ragnars men and becomes the leader of Dunholm in Ragnars absence. Is this Rollo a random character or is he the founder of the Normandy from 911? Rollo, the founder of Normandy, was supposedly born 846, so it he would be 24 in book three. Is this a coincidence or not?

Thank you very much for answering my question

Best wishes

Michael

A

It wasn’t an uncommon name – and the Rollo in the books isn’t related to William the Conqueror.


Q

Dear Cornwell,

I would really appreciate if you could answer some questions, related to waterloo and Grouchy, that would really help me out in my piece of work for my school. My main question is wether Grouchys actions, in the Waterloo war, where decisive or not? My questions for you are the following.

Do you believe that Grouchy decision was an error or he simple did what he was demanded to do?

Would you consider the ending of the war a Prusian and Englands army achievement or a Grouchy error?

And if you would like to add anything else, that may help me with my main question, i would really appreciate it. I have read your books and the stellar moments of humanity by Stefan Zweig. I would seriously take in to consideration any of your comments  when writing my work. Thanks and please continue publishing amazing books.

Best regards,

Jaime Riaño, from Spain

A

There’s no doubt that Grouchy’s men – 33,000 of them – would have been extremely useful to Napoleon, but the 18,000 that Wellington posted on his far right in case the French manouevered round his flank would have been useful to the British-Dutch army.  Grouchy’s error was dreadful, but the orders he received were opaque at best. It’s really hopeless dealing with ‘what might have been’, but plainly Napoleon needed Grouchy’s men and they never arrived. As to whether he did ‘what he was demanded to do’, well, he thought he did! But the orders he received were not explicit.

The victory was a joint British-Dutch-Prussian achievement!  Wellington would never have fought unless he trusted the Prussians to come, and Blucher wouldn’t have marched unless he trusted Wellington to stand and fight. That was what won the battle.


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