Your Questions

Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, Any plans for a sequel to Sharpe's Devil or even a new story about Sharpe on his return to England? If indeed he does return to England directly. James Butler

A

Maybe, don't know - perhaps. Anything's possible.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, at the risk of repeating fellow fans, thank you for your wonderful books. Thanks to you my whole family has developed an interest in history (a task that several local schools failed in to do). My favourites are the Grail Quest and the Arthur books, as I have ever been a sucker for heroes and warriors. Before I stumbled upon your books (a delightful accident), I was an avid fan of an author called Morgan Llywelyn whose writing style is very similar to yours. She writes largely concerning Irish mythology, eg Cuchulain, Brian Boru. I was wondering if this is a subject you would be tempted to write about. Also, have you ever read any of her books and what is your opinion of them? Finally I have to add my voice to the many fans who would like to see Arthur on the big screen. Thank you for the hours of entertainment you have given both my family and myself. Keep up the good work. Dominic Kenny

A

I fear I haven't read Morgan Llywelen, but obviously I should. Many thanks for your kind message.


Q

Dear Sir, I have just seen that Sharpe's Eagle is going to be published in the new style cover like that of Havoc and your new book Escape is this correct? If so is the whole series going to be published in this format? Eagerly waiting for Escape to hit the shelves. James

A

So far as I know yes. Five of them have been rejacketed in the new style, and I guess the rest will follow - this is only in Britain.


Q

Dear Bernard, your books are great but one thing I noticed is that you normally set the main (fictional) character around a real historical battle. Yet nearly all the real life historical battles are victories for the side they are on. I was wondering if you will get any of your main characters to a real life battle that is a defeat. I mean Alfred suffered some beatings from the Vikings before he won. While even Wellington met, in his words, a very good soldier at Burgos (Could Sharpe also meet that same good soldier)?. BTW Do you know the name of the French commander and did Wellington ever fight him again???? While not to say the South suffered defeats like Malvern Hill/Gettysburg/Bristoe and Rhappahock station and Knoxville (Longstreet)/Harris Farm (Ewell) Earlys defeats against Sheridon and Fort Stedman (Gordorn)before they were overwhelmed at Appomatox. Surely it would be a bit incredible and unfair if Starbuck could not experience some of these defeats. Anyway thank you for your time. Geriant

A

The French commander of Burgos Castle was General Dubreton - is that who you mean? I'm sure Sharpe could meet him. I'm sorry there aren't enough defeats for you! I'm writing Alfred right now, so perhaps that will redress the balance.


Q

Mr. Cornwell, I just finish reading Enemy of the God and Winter King, and can't wait to start reading Excalibur. I have read most of your series, and I can say that the Warlord series is on the top of my favorite list. The characters are wonderful! It is a pity that you will not consider to write another of this fine series. And Derfel Cadarn has replaced Richard Sharpe as my Cornwellian hero. I still like Sharpe, but Derfel has the values that distinguish him from the other heroes of yours. I have two questions: 1. All of your heroes came from unhappy family/childhood - Sharpe was a son of a whore, Derfel a son of a slave, Thomas Hookton a son of a crazy monk, and Nate Starbuck was estranged from his violent father. Do you think heroes could not come from a happy family/childhood? It can also be a good story is one of your future heroes do come from a more cheerful upbringing. 2. Have you ever considered writing historical fiction of other nation, other than anglo-saxon/british backgrounds? Atilla the Hun or the gallant Samurai can perfectly fit into your Cornwellian universe of brave warriors and vicious warlords. Thanks, Budi

A

I'm sure heroes can come from a happy family background, but we all write what we know! Which is probably the answer to your second question, and I'm most comfortable writing in the area of British/American history, and don't feel any great urge to look outside of it. I agree that may be a fault, but I've still a lot history to cover and many tales untold, so I fear the Samurai must wait! Sorry.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, Your Warlord trillogy was outstanding. I have rarely enjoyed a story so much. I loved how you wrote Lancelot. I have always thought he was a bore. Your take on the character was anything but. His death gave me satisfaction. I just have a couple questions. Have you ever visited the Higgins Armory Museum in Worcester? It's not all that far from Cape Cod. Do you ever give talks or have book signings on Cape Cod? Sincerely, Rich

A

I have not visited the Higgins Armory Museum, but I obviously must, so will. Thank you. No Cape Cod appearances scheduled at the moment, but if something comes up I'll be sure to post it to the Diary page.


Q

Dear Bernard I'm a great fan of your books, and I've just finished the Grail Quest trilogy. Wonderful as ever. One question please if I may. I always enjoy the historical notes and I now have many (probably too many) resolutions to visit some of the battle sites you describe. However I recently had cause to be in the North East and went to Durham for the day. I know I got into the general area of the Neville's Cross field due to the name of that part of town, but I was particularly interested in finding the large dip in the ground on the Scottish right wing. I was with other people unfortunately so I couldn't stay long, but I came across an estate called Archery Rise, which was just a huge bowl in the land. It'll bug me forever if I don't know, so please could you tell me - is the present day Archery Rise the piece of ground you referred to. Thanks Steve Jackson

A

I suppose it could be - but I have to admit that the place was so over-built that it was incredibly hard to get any feel for how the land might have been in the 14th century, and I have to admit that, though I explored the area, I never discovered Archery Rise! Sounds likely, though.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, in the Grail Quest you said some knights used battle axes but by the hundred years war they were rarely used, also why was there no reference to the english useing two-handed swords which they used more than any one else in the hundrer years war? Will you ever write about Edward Longshanks? Alex Verrall

A

There was no reference to two-handed swords because I don't believe they were that widely used. Of course I could be wrong. Vicious things, anyway, so I'll bear them in mind. Not sure you're right about the axes - they appear in early 14th century illustrations, but again I might be wrong. No plans for Edward Longshanks at the moment.


Q

How did Hakeswell escape from under the Elephant's foot? Bernard Lea

A

I wish I knew. Probably the elephant didn't want to get its foot dirty.


Q

I love your books and eagerly await each new addition. I know that Nate Starbuck is on the shelf for an indefinite time but I, for one, cannot wait for his return. Will a television series / movie be made based on the newer Sharpe novels? Andy Bertorelli

A

Nothing in the works at the moment.