Bulletin Board

Q

I've always been an avid reader, but ever since I picked up "The Winter King" 6 years ago in my high school library, I haven't been able to get enough of your writing. I've eagerly devoured the Arthur Books, all of the Saxon stories, the grail quest, and Stonehenge, and they all rank among the top novels I've ever read. Sitting down tonight to read "The Winter King" for the 5th time, I felt obligated to share my gratitude to you for creating works that have given me such entertainment.. Thank you very much. -Brian B.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, May I thank you for giving me such vast pleasure following your heroic characters through their life journeys. Curiosity prompts me to ask how and why Capt Sandman and Sgt Berrigan arrived in Gallow's Thief, whilst Richard Sharpe and Patrick Harper were bestriding the Napoleonic War era. The physical characteristics between Sharpe and Sandman and Harper and Berrigan are so similar. Happy Easter, Jim McMaster

A

I suspect Berrigan is very like Harper, but Sandman is so different to Sharpe (at least I think so). Maybe not, I won't argue with you! But Sandman's chief characteristic (to me) is his essential and Christian decency, and I'd never accuse Sharpe of that!


Q

Greetings Mr. Cornwell! I just finished the Sharpe series and wanted to send a heartfelt thanks. I enjoyed the books immensely. To me storytelling satisfies a need that is difficult to put into words. More than entertainment, it seems to reach an integral part of my DNA. And your work is at the very top of my list. I get pulled into the stories to the point where I don't realize that I am reading a novel. I am more of a time-traveling observer. Very best wishes to you and yours, Mark Younes


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, Having just finished reading the complete Starbuck series for at least the third time, I read what you had to say about continuing the series. I can see that there is a resemblance to Sharpe, but the big difference is that Sharpe was on the winning side. As we know the South lost the civil war and I would love to see how you would show Starbuck coping with defeats that inevitably lead to a complete defeat of the Southern states. I have all of the Sharpe books and almost all of the other books you have written so I thank you for all the pleasure you have given me. Forget the time I have spent reading instead of getting on with something more useful to others!!! Paddy Close


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell I would just like to say a huge thank you for your amazing literary skills. I'm just starting exams and the Grail Quest and the Saxon Stories are keeping me sane through 8 hour days of revision. I find that all the books combine pieces of knowledge but they are written so that they suck you into the story and I just can't put them down (except for revision books!). Thank you so much and I can't wait for the next book!

Corranne Wheeler


Q

Mr Cornwell I just wanted to let you know how enjoyable I am finding the Sharpe collection of books they are fantastic, Many thanks for the happy hours I have spent reading them.

Barry Heys


Q

I am 4/5 of the way through The Pale Horseman. Your action scenes, your character development, your settings all pull me into the narrative. With my 1/2 Norwegian ancestry (including Norse and Swedish kings and Vikings) and my Welsh and English ancestry, I have scarcely been able to put the book down. I cannot wait to buy your other Saxon novels. I'm looking at the titles of your other Saxon novels, and I see the last one is "Death of Kings", which, I assume, tells of the deaths of Harold Hardrada, my ancestor, and Harold, the last Saxon king, later that same year, 1066, at the hands of another Scandinavian, the bastard William the Conqueror. Can't wait to read the intervening books.

Joan Hamblin


Q

Greetings..I am an avid fan of your books, especially the Sharpes series. I am presently on my second reading of the series. Today I came across something which puzzled me at first. One of the characters makes mention of seeing a "Sciadopitys verticillata" AKA Japanese umbrella pine. I thought it odd that this species would be found in Spain during the nineteenth century also the description of its shape in your book did not match the form usually associated with Sciadopitys verticillata.. After some brief research on the web I believe the tree mentioned should have had the Latin name "Pinus pinea" AKA umbrella pine or stone pine and is a native species to the Iberian Peninsula. Not a big deal , and I doubt many other readers would spot it but I know how accurate your historical details usually are and thought you might like to know. Have you any plans to add to the Sharpe Series ? If not I suppose I'll just have to wait a year or two and start with Sharpe's Tiger all over again. Best wishes Joseph

A

I remember researching that! I think it's around the battle of Barossa? Did I use the Latin name? That sounds very un-Sharpe like! Or did someone mention it? No idea - I'm just sure you're right and I was wrong. There will be more Sharpe!


Q

I'm glad that Stephanie Moore Hopkins posted the review of Folville's Law. Though I must confess that the review threw me for a loop initially. I thought this novel might be something like Garrow's Law, which I'm now watching on PBS in America. Something about British crime and courts. I clicked on the Amazon link and was surprised to find it was actually an historical drama of political intrigue from 14th Century England. Well, I love both kinds of stories. Perhaps I'll give it a go in the not too distant future.

David M. Dunaj


Q

Sir, writing you from Inuvik, Northwest Terr., Canada. Just to say thank you for the research and obvious passion that you put into each and every story. All the best!

Christopher Ziegler