Bulletin Board

Q

My first book I read of yours was Stonehenge. Since then I have read every book, but NOT one Sharpe novel. That must be a first for a BC reader. The reason I have never started reading "Sharpe" is the fact that there are so many, and Sean Bean would be forever in my head as the lead role. Anyway, I am little bit pissed on Jack Daniels and would like to say thanks for bringing me back to reading. Rgds Wayne


Q

Damn you, you prolific bastard! I love your books. I've read the Arthurian stuff, the Archer stuff, and about half the Sharpe stuff. I have a job and a girlfriend and I hope I can keep both and still enjoy your work. I start a Sharpe with dinner and finish it about midnight. So far Derfel is my favorite character. Please keep up the work. You do it so well. If you make it to Seattle, I'll try to come out and join the queue. thanks, Jon


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I am a sergeant in the U.S. Army, and I just wanted to write to tell you how much I enjoy the Sharpe books. I have been reading them ever since I was introduced to them 2 years ago. I am delighted to say that I can scarcely read them fast enough to keep up with your new additions to the series. I also wanted to tell you how much I identify with Richard Sharpe's character. I have been serving in the Army since I was 17 years old, and I have recently been informed that I will be receiving a commission as a medical officer in just a few months when I start medical school. Will I suffer as much as Mr. Sharpe does, at the hands of my new peers? That remains to be seen, but I'd like to think that I won't. I hope my time in the ranks as a field artilleryman will be seen as an advantage, rather than a fault. In any case, keep up the good work and keep Mr. Sharpe marching! Sincerely, Grant H. Evans SGT, U.S. Army

A

Congratulations! Terrific! Well done! I suspect you will be treated well by your fellow officers - the US army is very different from Sharpe's army (at least I hope it is), and my most fervent wish for you is that you get as many beautiful women as Sharpe.


Q

The first book I read from you was Excalibur. I usually don't read such books, however, I was drawn to the cover. It has become the first of many of your books that I have read in the last 4 years. The Warlord series are the only books I have read more than once. You have become one of my favourite writers. I am now reading Heretic. I enjoy your novels a lot and look forward to your future publications. Yin Mark


Q

Again, my compliments for your Sharpe's historical work!!! Please permit me to submit two probable battles for your brainchild--Sharpe == Maida in Italy // Rolica in Portugal. Again congratulations. G. A. Margaritis, chemical engineer N.T.U.A.

A

Thank you - though whether either will get written, I don't know - I'm reluctant to take Sharpe backwards a second time, but who knows?


Q

Hi! I'm a Spaniard from Santiago de Compostela, and came to England to work abroad for a couple of years. I'm living now in Birmingham, and one of the guys from my workplace have just lend me a copy of "Sharpe's Rifles" when I told him I was from Galicia. I've just finished the book, and I'm very impressed with it; I was very enjoyable to follow all of Sharpe's adventures through Spain, and specially Galicia and my hometown, Santiago. I've recognized all the places you described, many of them where I'd use to play as a child, or streets I've gone through countless times. I was living in the old town of Santiago, just in front of San Martin's square, north of the cathedral. Not only that, but my parents were originally from a village in the Ulla valley!. I also liked very much the way you describe the Galician people and traditions, so accurately. For all that, and and such a very enjoyable historical book, thank you very much!, and you can count me as one of your loyal fans! Jos

A

Thank you!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I am a frequent business traveller and years ago I read a newspaper review of The Winter King. Never one to be without a novel in case of a flight delay, I quickly picked up a copy...needless to say, the rest of the series was purchased asap in hardcover. I was thoroughly entranced by the detail of the story; the different perspective on the Arthurian tale, and the immense possibility that someone should write a screenplay for this trilogy...just awesome. I loved the detail and emotion which emanated from the shield wall to the the final battle (...the rings of metal in one's beard from a fallen foe's armor is intriguing, is that a documented practice of the era?). I certainly would have had a few pints of mead in my belly before a battle as you so describe. Since reading the Winter King trilogy, I've gone on to read almost everything you've written and am particularly fond of the Sharpe series. Your novels about the Peninsular War (and India) bring to life a piece of World History almost completely passed over in US history classes....sure, we know who Napolean is - but the rest ? -what a shame. Your work inspired me to also do some family research and I was fortunate to find a distant relation who had served at Waterloo: Wounded Royal Scots, third battalion Captain Robert Dudgeon, severely. 16 June 1815. This made actually seeing the French colours captured by the Scots Greys at Waterloo, displayed in Edinborough castle, extraordinarily noteworthy for me. Many thanks for some great literature...I eagerly await the 20th Sharpe novel. Regards, Kelly Dudgeon

A

The rings of metal in the beard? I fear that is something I made up. I do appreciate your message.


Q

I have just finished reading Gallows Thief and found it one of the most enjoyable of all your books that I have so far read (all the Sharpe series and the grail Quest series) I wasn't able to put it down and go to sleep until 4am last night.... Looking forward to starting A Crowning Mercy tonight. thanks a million. Joe


Q

Just finished reading the Heretic. It was as usual, great. However, some of the swearing made me flinch. I realize that these characters are cold bloodthirsty killers, but to be afraid of God as they were, their language is direct blasphemy at best. It's hard to believe they would swear to god as they did in the Heretic. All that aside, keep it up. I can"t wait to see what Thomas does next. Yours truly, Sherwood Perkins

A

Swearing has two sources, religious and you know what, and all the evidence suggests that blasphemy was extremely common. The French nickname for the English was 'les goddams' because of their propensity to say 'God damn'. Bloody is from 'by our lady'. That which we hold most dear makes for the most effective swear words, otherwise they would have no shock value, and our ancestors were just as foul-mouthed as modern soldiers.


Q

g,day sir. i have read most of your books including the Arthur books 3 times. I consider them the finest stuff I have read. Is there any art, prints or posters available on the characters and what would Derfel's shield look like? I think that might make an interesting tatoo. Cheers Cliff Collins

A

I don't know of any - but I like the idea, thank you.