Bulletin Board

Q

G'day Mr Cornwell. I'm not usually one to write letters or emails such as this, but I would like to take the opportunity to thank you for the many, many hours of reading pleasure, your writing has given me. Your books, in particular, the Sharpe series, have accompanied me on several operational deployments with the Australian Defence Force, and although they are now somewhat dog-eared, they sit patiently on my bookshelf, ready for the next one. Whilst I certainly could NOT say that Richard Sharpe makes a good role model for my fellow soldiers, I find the spirit of adventure and determination you have created with your characters a most admirable trait. I await Sharpe's next march eagerly. regards Dale McGrath PS-Patrick Harper's decendants could very well be Australian however...

A

No, I suppose Sharpe does not make a good role model...but I do thank you for your kind words.


Q

Looking forward to reading about Uthred, since I am of an age and a Viking re-enactor. Having stood in a shield-wall with a score of others and faced down the like, wearing 35lbs of mail shirt and carrying a bloody great oak shield and hefty sword, I know it for the least part of the sweating, greasy-footed, panic-stricken hell it must have been. I have my own novel (about the Rus) in the making and hope to send you a copy one day! Meanwhile - thanks for all the rainy-day enjoyment.
Bob Low

A

Thanks! Good luck with your book - I'll look forward to reading it.


Q

I've been a fan of your books ever since I read Sharpe's Eagle after a friend's recommendation. I just picked up Sharpe's Escape at the book store yesterday and I'm really enjoying it. I just have one simple request though; please write another Starbuck book! Thanks for all of the great books. Charles Cone


Q

Don't answer this. I just want to comment on your latest Sharpe book "Sharpe's escape." It's time Sharpe stuck with one woman, and I think Sarah Fry will suit. You should do something nice for her since her reputation is in shatters, she will probably never be able to get another respectiable job, and she has no money. You've made her a strong, interesting woman (and of course, attractive). Keep her. This is the opinion of a female fan.


Q

Hi, I live in England and I'm 15. I first read 'Sharpe's Rifles' a few months ago and since then I have read many of the others in the series. I think they are amazing books; they really depict those terrible days of the Napoleonic Wars and they bring them alive. I am now reading 'Sharpe's Sword' but so far, my favourite is 'Sharpe's Tiger' because of the strong Indian culture presented in it. Thank-you very much. Sophie Wicks

A

Thanks for your message Sophie, I'm very glad to hear from you.


Q

Dear Mr Cornwell, thanks for "Sharpe's Escape" another great one. I have "fought" along side Sharpe since I read a review of "Sharpe's Sword" in the evening standard lord knows how many years ago. Like yourself I now live in the U.S but in Florida, and I look forward to the publication of your books with a hunger. To use an old phrase "you lead others follow". r.m.campbell


Q

Hello, I read all the Sharpe books. They were pretty good. Then I read the Arthur books and they are somewhat amazing. I've read kArthur stories since I was like five and yours are blatantly the best (apart from Gawain and the Green Knight which, as a poet, I appreciate as being deeply funky). Anyway, I have been reading them again this weekend, albiet out of order. I really love my girlfriend, but it's a bit annoying when she phones and interrupts. Lord of the Rings is a joke compared to your trilogy (okay, so I haven't read the books, but I know the story from the film and from dipping I think the prose is boring). I'm glad they're your favourite books that you've written, you would not deserve your gift if they were not. My favourite retelling is Tristan and Iseult; the economy of your rendition is brutal perfection. It's a crime if a film is not made of it and a travesty if it is and it's compromised. Guenivere and Talesin's conversation about poetry is touched with genius. It says everything about poetry now. I love the way that magic is not undermined by trickery in the books, somehow they make magic seem more possible. Anyway, Enemy of God (where Derfel and Ceinwyn get together) inspired the poem I wrote today, and it was quite good, so I thought I'd write and say thank you for the Arthur books. It's a shame you can't do more, but clearly you can't. I hope that when you pass to the otherworld you are remembered for these books and not Sharpe etc, because they are a most genuine contribution to literature, thanks for reading, Paul.


Q

How dare you Sir...... I recently began re-reading Sharpes adventures in order, but you've stopped me in my tracks with Sharpe's Escape. Unfortunately my partner refuses to allow me the hard back version of your books as, I quote, "it won't match the rest." Sharpe's Havoc went down a treat when I bought it...Therefore I'm stuck in limbo once I've finished Sharpes Gold and you have stopped Sharpe and I reaching Chile and meeting Bony. Keep writing, love the books and I look forward to the new adventure (in paper back). Oh any more surprises? Peter Rickman

A

More surprises? I'll try to come up with a few...


Q

I just wanted to tell you that I am hooked...first the Thomas of Hookton and now the Sharpe series (I've read 4 so far). You are truly an amazing author...I know what I plan to do all summer long! And I have my boss hooked as well! Best regards and congratulations on the most awesome books. P.S. I just could not get into Stonehenge, perhaps for the same reason as I could not really enjoy Lord of the Rings. R Mukund


Q

Hello Bernard. Finished reading Sharpe's Escape on Tuesday and just wanted to say that I thought it was brilliant, as fast-paced as Sharpe's Eagle ever was. I was addicted from the beginning and picked the book up every spare moment I had - got it read in two days, thankfully. Can't wait for the next one. Kind regards, Sharon.