Bulletin Board

Q

Hi! I've just begun reading the Sharpe series, and I have to say that it is the best series I've read in a long time. The Grail Quest was my first introduction to your writing and since then I've read most of your other novels. You've really inspired me to do some in depth research into Napolean's era. So, Thanks! and I'm looking forward to finding out what happens to good 'ol Sharpe next! Courtney


Q

Dear Bernard, just a note to say that after taking your recommendations I bought and read both Sears Gates of Richmond (Kind of interesting to think how the US Civil would have turned out differently if McClellan had taken Porter's advice and counter attacked at Malvern Hill) and Pagets Wellington's battlefields. Both excellent books and I can see why you used them. On a counter I can really recommend To the North Anna river Grant and Lee May 13-25 1864 by Gordorn C Rhea the book about probably the least famous of their fights in the 40 days. And Redcoats and Greyjackets by Donald Graves about the battle of Chippwea. (Struck by how rather Sharpe like characters both Thomas Pearson and John Nortorn are). P.S Will the next Sharpe book (after Escape) be about Albuera and skip Barossa cause it seems a bit absurd for even Sharpe to get to there besides which it is a lot less dramatic engagement than the Blood bath at Albuera which as one historian said seems rather tragic since they still could not capture Badajoz and had to wait until next year and all those men died for nothing .
Geriant

A

Thanks for your recommendations. I don't know what the next Sharpe book will be - after Sharpe's Escape - which is Busaco, Coimbra and the Lines of Torres Vedras. I probably won't write it till next year which means I don't have to start thinking about it for a few months, but I note your comments!


Q

I have to start by saying thank you! it is an over used expression but it means some thing. I truly enjoyed The WarLord Chronicles. They are what started me reading books. I do historic re-enactment and I find your books so correct and accurate. I have been urged to write short stories set in the Iron age as I'm dyslexic it is a little harder but I love it so much. Thank you for the wonderful words. Keep writing. Best Wishes Liam Aggett

A

Thanks Liam. Best of luck with your writing!


Q

Hi Bernard, I couldn't agree more with Peter Harris ( 24 Feb) who said you should visit New Zealand. All New Zealanders know that it is "Godzone Country" and if you saw Lord of the Rings or The Last Samurai you'll know it too! Just make sure you visit some of the provincial towns too. I recently treated myself to Sharpe's Christmas, a real bonus - especially the story with Sharpe and Lucille after the war. Thank you, Fiona

A

Hopefully I will get there someday!


Q

Hi Mr Cornwell. Just finished reading the Starbuck chronicles and must say they are brilliant, much like the rest of your books. I have read most of them. But after reading the last 4 words of the Bloody Ground - you know, the ones you are not allowed to forget. That Starbuck will march again. I thought I would check your web site to see when this would be. But to my horror you are not planning to do this for a long time. Can you please reconsider this. Of course I know that Nate is a fictional character but Nate, his friends and his enemies all live in my head now and l would dearly love to know what happens to them. I also looked at your Questions web page and it seems I am not the only one who would like this. Felt sorry for one poor chap who is Seventy five years old. Time might run out for this poor guy. Can you do it for him if not the rest of us. Sorry for moaning because you have given me hours of enjoyment with your books and I am truely greatful for that. But I/we need to know. Thank again and have fun, cheers Trev.

A

As soon as I know I'll let you know - promise!


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I have just finished another wonderful novel Sharpe's Tiger, making six very enjoyable novels. I learned about you from the PBS series a few years ago, it was great, but still did not do the book justice. Are you considering another stab at making a movie? Considering the success of Master and Commander, I believe that your product would be a natural. In fact I would be shocked if even Hollywood could mess up the rich characters that you have developed. Keep up the wonderful work and I have a great deal of reading to do on your other books. Mitchell Manoff

A

Thanks, I'm glad to know you're enjoying the books. I'd be thrilled to see another of my books turned into film - but I'm not a filmmaker so it's up to someone else to do it.


Q

Dear Mr.Cornwell, I am a huge fan of your works. I have read all the Sharpe series (that is out) 3 times and I have read your book about the American Revoulution. Because of your and Patrick O'Brians influence I have decided to teach the French Revoulution in a college some day. I would love to hear more about your veiws of the French Revolution, and about how you come up with the ideas for Aharpe and your other novels. Thanks a lot, Ty McTernan

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What do I think of the French Revolution? Barbaric, misleading and disastrous. No one could defend the Ancien Regime, but what replaced it was much worse and, in the power vacuum, it allowed in a military adventurer like Napoleon. I go along with Edmund Burke, one of my heroes - and worth reading!
How did I come up with the idea of the novels? Dunno, really. I guess I write about what interests me, nothing more. Sharpe, of course, is Hornblower on land, but the others? Whatever takes my interest.


Q

No need to write back. I started with and am enjoying your Grail Quest series and I am look forward to reading others. Your publishers are correct though, as an American I would never have opened a book titled "Harlequin" because of the trashy series. Have a wonderful day. AW


Q

I'm enjoying my way through the Sharpe's books, and only wish there was some way to alter the laws of relativity so I could make the books laaaaaaast forever! With each book, I get a further glimpse into Sharpe's past, his insecurity, (OK! his pathology- but we love him anyway!) and the events which made him who he is today. Since you don't want book suggestions, I won't suggest that you write a book about his childhood, perhaps even from before birth. I'm sure you could do it without revealing the tightly held secret of his father. I'd love to see him scamping in the streets, picking oakum, and being a general juvenile delinquent. The seamier side of London in that era is certainly colorful and fascinating. Maybe you could include in your books a few more tidbits from his tender(er) years so we can add to our vision of the boy. What a great anti-hero sort of hero you have created. Even when he's miserable, he always keeps me smiling. Thank you for taking the time to read this. Paula Santirocco

A

Um, maybe. Trouble is I've taken him back once and I'm reluctant to do it again. But never say never.


Q

Mr. Cornwell, I am a 22 year old seamen that just graduated from Texas A&M. Believe it or not, but I have a lot of spare time on my hands when I am offshore. I just finished the Arthur books and Stonehenge. I am starting the Sharpe books and just wanted to thank you for your help in passing the time. Thank You, Daniel Blanton