Your Questions

Q

In the past I have noticed and enjoyed discussions on your site regarding movies based on historical events. I recently viewed ( again) "The Bounty". Which I really enjoyed. I thought the detail authentic, including the pre-1801 flag, but I was puzzled by the use of the "loot" pronunciation when" lieutenant" was spoken, ie as opposed to "left" tenant. I always thought "loot" was the US pronunciation while "left" was UK. Perhaps you could throw some light on this? Rgds Robert Marsh

A

I think you're right and 'leftenant' is Britspeak and 'Lootenant' is US, but was it always thus? I don't know. It comes from the French, of course, lieu meaning place and tenant a holder, so a lootenant is a place holder, which doesn't help much. But the Oxford English Dictionary, as usual, comes to my rescue and says that a Mr Walker, in 1793, gives the pronunciation as Leftenant but he hoped that the correct pronunciation Lootenant will in the end win out. So it looks as if the Brits always said Left, and were wrong, and still are, and so were the folk who made the film.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, This is one of those "Have you ever thought about writing a book about..." questions! How about extending the Napoleonic coverage to the War of 1812? Specifically, the Battle of New Orleans, where the 95th Rifles were engaged. I believe Sharpe was busy elsewhere at the time, so it could be an independent novel like "Redcoat". A good reference book is "The British at the Gates", by Robin Reilly. He's a former British Army officer, living in New Orleans. I've visited the Chalmette Battlefield and found it fascinating. Anyway, please add my voice to the ever-growing demand for more Starbuck novels. Best regards. Ray Lemke

A

It'll go on the list - but no promises!


Q

Mr. Cornwell, Though I have seen it mentioned in other questions and comments on this site I haven't found a clear answer. Do you know if a screenplay is being developed for The Warlord Chronicles? Have you been approached concerning a screenplay for the series? Is there a remote chance of the series becoming a movie? Would you like to see them on the big screen? You must here this a lot but it bears repeating, it would make one heck of a movie, a series that would rival The Lord of the Rings!!! Regards Ryan

Do you know if the producers of the new Arthur film have used your Arthur Trilogy as reference for costumes, names and locations? The few stills I've seen of the production look very good. Mark Smullen

A

Would I like to see it? Sure!!! Is there a remote chance? Probably not. The new film is not based on my books.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, Thank you very much for posting chapter one of Sharpe's escape. I notice that our Sharpe begins the book in a very bad mood and that got me thinking--I believe he is in a bad mood at the start of almost every book in the series. Has this become a tradition or inside joke for you or is our Sharpe just a very bad tempered bloke? Regards, Joy Parker

A

Horribly tempered, unspeakably awful and desperately in need of psycho-analysis, anger-management therapy and sensitivity training. I'm not going to change him though.


Q

I would love to go to a lecture series by you. Do you plan to give any in the near future on the West Coast of the U. S.? Robert Manes

A

Not this year, perhaps at a future date?


Q

Dear Bernard, Previously in the Diary Page, there was a mention of a U.S. book tour in October. I noticed that this item was removed from the Diary page. Will there be a U.S. tour this year? Charles Romeo

Do you do signings at bookshops in the US?
E. Ross

A

I do signings at US bookshops when on tour, but it does not seem likely that there will be a US tour this year.


Q

I recently started reading your books last year. I've read a half dozen Sharpe books, the Warlord Chronicles and the Grail Quest Series and love them all. I've just got a few questions for you. 1. Why are there different covers for the UK and US editions of your books? 2. Why are there some different titles for the UK and US editions (i.e., Harlequin v. The Archer's Tale, Sharpe's Waterloo v. Waterloo)? P.S. I also think the Warlord Chronicles would make a great movie trilogy. I actually saw a preview for a new movie titled, "King Arthur" and was disappointed to find out it wasn't based on your books. I was a little disappointed when I saw in the previews they were using arrows and catapults, but at least Merlin looks like a druid, unlike the movie, "Excalibur." Hubert Cheung

A

The book covers are decided by the publishers as are the book titles. (Click on the Grail Quest book page for more detail about the Harlequin/The Archer's Tale name change.)


Q

Bernard: I'm a big fan and have read all your works. A while back one of your fans asked if you planned on doing anymore maritime works in the spirit of "Sharpe's Trafalger". You replied no because others do it better. I've read all the C.S. Forrester and Patrick O'Brien's works. Are there any other authors with books similar to the Hornblower and Aubrey/Maturin series? Thanks for your time and all you do. Bill Thorpe

A

There are indeed. Alexander Kent, Dudley Pope and Dewey Lambden all spring to mind.


Q

Dear Mr.Cornwell, I have been in touch with you before but felt I had to thank you (and Mrs.Cornwell may I add!) for the wonderful book A Crowning Mercy. I have read many of your books and enjoyed them very much. I found this book very refreshing and found it very hard not to sneak off to the loo at work every two hours when the boss wasn't looking to try and finish another chapter. One thing I would like to ask you is how familiar you are with Dorset? I've lived in Wimborne Minster all my life and it seems that Dorset pops up in many of your novels. What about a novel about Jack the Ripper? One of the three main suspects being buried in Wimborne Minster grounds, or the nearby village of Horton where the Duke of Monmouth was caught hiding in a ditch by Militiamen with the seal of England? Or Knowlton Church and earthworks, by far the creepiest place I know. In the meantime many thanks again for so many hours of enjoyment that your books have given me. (Please don't bin Thomas of Hookton!) Regards David A Wimborne, Dorset

A

When I die and go to heaven I'll find myself living in Dorset. It just happens to be my favourite place, and somewhere I've always wanted to live - I did once live next door in Devon. I guess it ain't going to happen now, but whenever I get the chance I go and indulge the dream. Somehow I've missed Knowlton, so I'll go there. I think Dorset is the best kept secret in England, so I'll say no more.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, Since my friends live in Wapping, I go there often, and I was surprised (and pleased!) to see that Brewhouse Lane is a real place, as are the other streets mentioned in 'Prey' I think that Sharpe would be somewhat surprised to see Wapping today! My question is, did you simply use an A to Z for the names, or did you visit Wapping as well? There are some really old pubs which existed when Sharpe was meant to have lived there, and for me it gives 'Prey' extra colour and atmosphere. I am glad that there is to be more Sharpe written. Is there any chance of a full-length film? Yours, Robin Armstrong

A

I visited. And had the comfort of knowing that I'm a real cockney, born not far away. Still haven't eaten a jellied eel, though. No full-length film based on any of my books in the works at the moment.