Your Questions

Q

My husband and I listen to your audio books (we have also read most of your wonderful books). PLEASE! David Case the best ; but who is the phlegmy voice on one or two of the other Sharpe novels? Can't abide the voice. Unable to listen to the tape! Do you have a say so? J. F. Holmes

A

No, sorry, I don't. You may want to contact the publisher directly to express your concerns.


Q

Dear Bernard, Previously in the Diary Page, there was a mention of a U.S. book tour in October. I noticed that this item was removed from the Diary page. Will there be a U.S. tour this year? Charles Romeo

Do you do signings at bookshops in the US?
E. Ross

A

I do signings at US bookshops when on tour, but it does not seem likely that there will be a US tour this year.


Q

I recently started reading your books last year. I've read a half dozen Sharpe books, the Warlord Chronicles and the Grail Quest Series and love them all. I've just got a few questions for you. 1. Why are there different covers for the UK and US editions of your books? 2. Why are there some different titles for the UK and US editions (i.e., Harlequin v. The Archer's Tale, Sharpe's Waterloo v. Waterloo)? P.S. I also think the Warlord Chronicles would make a great movie trilogy. I actually saw a preview for a new movie titled, "King Arthur" and was disappointed to find out it wasn't based on your books. I was a little disappointed when I saw in the previews they were using arrows and catapults, but at least Merlin looks like a druid, unlike the movie, "Excalibur." Hubert Cheung

A

The book covers are decided by the publishers as are the book titles. (Click on the Grail Quest book page for more detail about the Harlequin/The Archer's Tale name change.)


Q

Bernard: I'm a big fan and have read all your works. A while back one of your fans asked if you planned on doing anymore maritime works in the spirit of "Sharpe's Trafalger". You replied no because others do it better. I've read all the C.S. Forrester and Patrick O'Brien's works. Are there any other authors with books similar to the Hornblower and Aubrey/Maturin series? Thanks for your time and all you do. Bill Thorpe

A

There are indeed. Alexander Kent, Dudley Pope and Dewey Lambden all spring to mind.


Q

Dear Mr.Cornwell, I have been in touch with you before but felt I had to thank you (and Mrs.Cornwell may I add!) for the wonderful book A Crowning Mercy. I have read many of your books and enjoyed them very much. I found this book very refreshing and found it very hard not to sneak off to the loo at work every two hours when the boss wasn't looking to try and finish another chapter. One thing I would like to ask you is how familiar you are with Dorset? I've lived in Wimborne Minster all my life and it seems that Dorset pops up in many of your novels. What about a novel about Jack the Ripper? One of the three main suspects being buried in Wimborne Minster grounds, or the nearby village of Horton where the Duke of Monmouth was caught hiding in a ditch by Militiamen with the seal of England? Or Knowlton Church and earthworks, by far the creepiest place I know. In the meantime many thanks again for so many hours of enjoyment that your books have given me. (Please don't bin Thomas of Hookton!) Regards David A Wimborne, Dorset

A

When I die and go to heaven I'll find myself living in Dorset. It just happens to be my favourite place, and somewhere I've always wanted to live - I did once live next door in Devon. I guess it ain't going to happen now, but whenever I get the chance I go and indulge the dream. Somehow I've missed Knowlton, so I'll go there. I think Dorset is the best kept secret in England, so I'll say no more.


Q

Hello. Thanks for the Sharpe series - they've displaced Hornblower as my favourite "rereading in the loo 'till I get pins and needles" books. I'm looking forward to "Escape", (I prefer paperbacks, so it may be a while). Like many others, I'd love to see a sequel (or even a prequel, perhaps) to Gallows Thief. I've got it on tape, which is excellent - a TV adaptation would be marvellous, as long as Carlton weren't involved. I've only seen positive reaction to the series, but I'm not impressed so far, having just bought the DVD set and watched Sharpe's Eagle. I noticed you don't watch TV (nor do I, on the whole - the DVDs were an excuse to be more sociable, as I tend to hide upstairs when the telly is on!), but have you seen the Carlton stuff, and what do you think (I guess you may have to be circumspect if you didn't like them)? Thanks again. Graham Nicholls

A

I was, of course, delighted to see the books turned into film and quite pleased with the results.


Q

First edition hardback copies of Sharpes Sword are way beyond my budget. The high prices are usually blamed on a low print run (500). I wondered why the run was so small? Yours Andrew McLaren

A

I believe the print run was 3000 - still small, presumably because they didn't think they could sell more.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, please could you tell me the inspiration for the name "Sharpe" in your marvellous novels. Many thanks, Sue Winch

A

He is named after Richard Sharp the great rugby player - all I did was add an 'e'.


Q

Dear Mr. Cornwell, I am a long-time fan of your work (esp. the Sharpe series-alas , I have no valuable 1st editions as I am too frugal-alright cheap to buy hardcovers). I was gratified to see a new 'Sharpe' is on the horizon. I just finished "Gallows Thief". It was a great read and Rider Sandman looks like a character with great potential. How was it received and do you plan on continuing Sandman's adventures? Thanks from a historical junkie Michael Ruskey

A

There's a good chance of another adventure for Sandman, but I'm not sure when I'll get to it.


Q

Hello. Just a quick note to say that I first read your books when I was at boarding school. It was a grim time sometimes but I do remember finding a battered copy of Sharpe's Gold in the school library, hurray! I spent many a dull weekend following Sharpe and Harper all over Spain and India. I even managed to convert some of my mates who also read the books, and my copy of Sharpe's Trafalgar was well read by about 20 people and is heavily re-inforced with cellotape! Anyhow, I've read the bulletin board and I've noticed that there is a glimmer of hope in rousing Sharpe from Lucille's Farm after Sharpe's Escape is there a possibility in Sharpe strapping on the sword belt for one last time? James Walkerdine

A

It's possible - always possible, but likely? Don't know. It's something for a few years away.